ldefs-boot.el 1.41 MB
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;;; loaddefs.el --- automatically extracted autoloads
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;;
;;; Code:


;;;### (autoloads nil "5x5" "play/5x5.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from play/5x5.el

(autoload '5x5 "5x5" "\
Play 5x5.

The object of 5x5 is very simple, by moving around the grid and flipping
squares you must fill the grid.

5x5 keyboard bindings are:
\\<5x5-mode-map>
Flip                        \\[5x5-flip-current]
Move up                     \\[5x5-up]
Move down                   \\[5x5-down]
Move left                   \\[5x5-left]
Move right                  \\[5x5-right]
Start new game              \\[5x5-new-game]
New game with random grid   \\[5x5-randomize]
Random cracker              \\[5x5-crack-randomly]
Mutate current cracker      \\[5x5-crack-mutating-current]
Mutate best cracker         \\[5x5-crack-mutating-best]
Mutate xor cracker          \\[5x5-crack-xor-mutate]
Solve with Calc             \\[5x5-solve-suggest]
Rotate left Calc Solutions  \\[5x5-solve-rotate-left]
Rotate right Calc Solutions \\[5x5-solve-rotate-right]
Quit current game           \\[5x5-quit-game]

\(fn &optional SIZE)" t nil)

(autoload '5x5-crack-randomly "5x5" "\
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Attempt to crack 5x5 using random solutions." t nil)
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(autoload '5x5-crack-mutating-current "5x5" "\
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Attempt to crack 5x5 by mutating the current solution." t nil)
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(autoload '5x5-crack-mutating-best "5x5" "\
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Attempt to crack 5x5 by mutating the best solution." t nil)
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(autoload '5x5-crack-xor-mutate "5x5" "\
Attempt to crack 5x5 by xoring the current and best solution.
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Mutate the result." t nil)
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(autoload '5x5-crack "5x5" "\
Attempt to find a solution for 5x5.

5x5-crack takes the argument BREEDER which should be a function that takes
two parameters, the first will be a grid vector array that is the current
solution and the second will be the best solution so far.  The function
should return a grid vector array that is the new solution.

\(fn BREEDER)" t nil)

(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "5x5" '("5x5-")))

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "add-log" "vc/add-log.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from vc/add-log.el

(put 'change-log-default-name 'safe-local-variable 'string-or-null-p)

(defvar add-log-current-defun-function nil "\
If non-nil, function to guess name of surrounding function.
It is called by `add-log-current-defun' with no argument, and
should return the function's name as a string, or nil if point is
outside a function.")

(custom-autoload 'add-log-current-defun-function "add-log" t)

(defvar add-log-full-name nil "\
Full name of user, for inclusion in ChangeLog daily headers.
This defaults to the value returned by the function `user-full-name'.")

(custom-autoload 'add-log-full-name "add-log" t)

(defvar add-log-mailing-address nil "\
Email addresses of user, for inclusion in ChangeLog headers.
This defaults to the value of `user-mail-address'.  In addition to
being a simple string, this value can also be a list.  All elements
will be recognized as referring to the same user; when creating a new
ChangeLog entry, one element will be chosen at random.")

(custom-autoload 'add-log-mailing-address "add-log" t)

(autoload 'prompt-for-change-log-name "add-log" "\
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Prompt for a change log name." nil nil)
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(autoload 'find-change-log "add-log" "\
Find a change log file for \\[add-change-log-entry] and return the name.

Optional arg FILE-NAME specifies the file to use.
If FILE-NAME is nil, use the value of `change-log-default-name'.
If `change-log-default-name' is nil, behave as though it were \"ChangeLog\"
\(or whatever we use on this operating system).

If `change-log-default-name' contains a leading directory component, then
simply find it in the current directory.  Otherwise, search in the current
directory and its successive parents for a file so named.  Stop at the first
such file that exists (or has a buffer visiting it), or the first directory
that contains any of `change-log-directory-files'.  If no match is found,
use the current directory.  To override the choice of this function,
simply create an empty ChangeLog file first by hand in the desired place.

Once a file is found, `change-log-default-name' is set locally in the
current buffer to the complete file name.
Optional arg BUFFER-FILE overrides `buffer-file-name'.

\(fn &optional FILE-NAME BUFFER-FILE)" nil nil)

(autoload 'add-change-log-entry "add-log" "\
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Find ChangeLog buffer, add an entry for today and an item for this file.
Optional arg WHOAMI (interactive prefix) non-nil means prompt for
user name and email (stored in `add-log-full-name'
and `add-log-mailing-address').

Second arg CHANGELOG-FILE-NAME is the file name of the change log.
If nil, use the value of `change-log-default-name'.  If the file
thus named exists, it is used for the new entry.  If it doesn't
exist, it is created, unless `add-log-dont-create-changelog-file' is t,
in which case a suitably named buffer that doesn't visit any file
is used for keeping entries pertaining to CHANGELOG-FILE-NAME's
directory.
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Third arg OTHER-WINDOW non-nil means visit in other window.

Fourth arg NEW-ENTRY non-nil means always create a new entry at the front;
never append to an existing entry.  Option `add-log-keep-changes-together'
otherwise affects whether a new entry is created.

Fifth arg PUT-NEW-ENTRY-ON-NEW-LINE non-nil means that if a new
entry is created, put it on a new line by itself, do not put it
after a comma on an existing line.

Option `add-log-always-start-new-record' non-nil means always create a
new record, even when the last record was made on the same date and by
the same person.

The change log file can start with a copyright notice and a copying
permission notice.  The first blank line indicates the end of these
notices.

Today's date is calculated according to `add-log-time-zone-rule' if
non-nil, otherwise in local time.

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\(fn &optional WHOAMI CHANGELOG-FILE-NAME OTHER-WINDOW NEW-ENTRY PUT-NEW-ENTRY-ON-NEW-LINE)" t nil)
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(autoload 'add-change-log-entry-other-window "add-log" "\
Find change log file in other window and add entry and item.
This is just like `add-change-log-entry' except that it displays
the change log file in another window.

\(fn &optional WHOAMI FILE-NAME)" t nil)

(autoload 'change-log-mode "add-log" "\
Major mode for editing change logs; like Indented Text mode.
Prevents numeric backups and sets `left-margin' to 8 and `fill-column' to 74.
New log entries are usually made with \\[add-change-log-entry] or \\[add-change-log-entry-other-window].
Each entry behaves as a paragraph, and the entries for one day as a page.
Runs `change-log-mode-hook'.

\\{change-log-mode-map}

\(fn)" t nil)

(autoload 'add-log-current-defun "add-log" "\
Return name of function definition point is in, or nil.

Understands C, Lisp, LaTeX (\"functions\" are chapters, sections, ...),
Texinfo (@node titles) and Perl.

Other modes are handled by a heuristic that looks in the 10K before
point for uppercase headings starting in the first column or
identifiers followed by `:' or `='.  See variables
`add-log-current-defun-header-regexp' and
`add-log-current-defun-function'.

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Has a preference of looking backwards." nil nil)
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(autoload 'change-log-merge "add-log" "\
Merge the contents of change log file OTHER-LOG with this buffer.
Both must be found in Change Log mode (since the merging depends on
the appropriate motion commands).  OTHER-LOG can be either a file name
or a buffer.

Entries are inserted in chronological order.  Both the current and
old-style time formats for entries are supported.

\(fn OTHER-LOG)" t nil)

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(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "add-log" '("add-log-" "change-log-")))
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;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "advice" "emacs-lisp/advice.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from emacs-lisp/advice.el

(defvar ad-redefinition-action 'warn "\
Defines what to do with redefinitions during Advice de/activation.
Redefinition occurs if a previously activated function that already has an
original definition associated with it gets redefined and then de/activated.
In such a case we can either accept the current definition as the new
original definition, discard the current definition and replace it with the
old original, or keep it and raise an error.  The values `accept', `discard',
`error' or `warn' govern what will be done.  `warn' is just like `accept' but
it additionally prints a warning message.  All other values will be
interpreted as `error'.")

(custom-autoload 'ad-redefinition-action "advice" t)

(defvar ad-default-compilation-action 'maybe "\
Defines whether to compile advised definitions during activation.
A value of `always' will result in unconditional compilation, `never' will
always avoid compilation, `maybe' will compile if the byte-compiler is already
loaded, and `like-original' will compile if the original definition of the
advised function is compiled or a built-in function.  Every other value will
be interpreted as `maybe'.  This variable will only be considered if the
COMPILE argument of `ad-activate' was supplied as nil.")

(custom-autoload 'ad-default-compilation-action "advice" t)

(autoload 'ad-enable-advice "advice" "\
Enables the advice of FUNCTION with CLASS and NAME.

\(fn FUNCTION CLASS NAME)" t nil)

(autoload 'ad-disable-advice "advice" "\
Disable the advice of FUNCTION with CLASS and NAME.

\(fn FUNCTION CLASS NAME)" t nil)

(autoload 'ad-add-advice "advice" "\
Add a piece of ADVICE to FUNCTION's list of advices in CLASS.

ADVICE has the form (NAME PROTECTED ENABLED DEFINITION), where
NAME is the advice name; PROTECTED is a flag specifying whether
to protect against non-local exits; ENABLED is a flag specifying
whether to initially enable the advice; and DEFINITION has the
form (advice . LAMBDA), where LAMBDA is a lambda expression.

If FUNCTION already has a piece of advice with the same name,
then POSITION is ignored, and the old advice is overwritten with
the new one.

If FUNCTION already has one or more pieces of advice of the
specified CLASS, then POSITION determines where the new piece
goes.  POSITION can either be `first', `last' or a number (where
0 corresponds to `first', and numbers outside the valid range are
mapped to the closest extremal position).

If FUNCTION was not advised already, its advice info will be
initialized.  Redefining a piece of advice whose name is part of
the cache-id will clear the cache.

\(fn FUNCTION ADVICE CLASS POSITION)" nil nil)

(autoload 'ad-activate "advice" "\
Activate all the advice information of an advised FUNCTION.
If FUNCTION has a proper original definition then an advised
definition will be generated from FUNCTION's advice info and the
definition of FUNCTION will be replaced with it.  If a previously
cached advised definition was available, it will be used.
The optional COMPILE argument determines whether the resulting function
or a compilable cached definition will be compiled.  If it is negative
no compilation will be performed, if it is positive or otherwise non-nil
the resulting function will be compiled, if it is nil the behavior depends
on the value of `ad-default-compilation-action' (which see).
Activation of an advised function that has an advice info but no actual
pieces of advice is equivalent to a call to `ad-unadvise'.  Activation of
an advised function that has actual pieces of advice but none of them are
enabled is equivalent to a call to `ad-deactivate'.  The current advised
definition will always be cached for later usage.

\(fn FUNCTION &optional COMPILE)" t nil)

(autoload 'defadvice "advice" "\
Define a piece of advice for FUNCTION (a symbol).
The syntax of `defadvice' is as follows:

  (defadvice FUNCTION (CLASS NAME [POSITION] [ARGLIST] FLAG...)
    [DOCSTRING] [INTERACTIVE-FORM]
    BODY...)

FUNCTION ::= Name of the function to be advised.
CLASS ::= `before' | `around' | `after' | `activation' | `deactivation'.
NAME ::= Non-nil symbol that names this piece of advice.
POSITION ::= `first' | `last' | NUMBER. Optional, defaults to `first',
    see also `ad-add-advice'.
ARGLIST ::= An optional argument list to be used for the advised function
    instead of the argument list of the original.  The first one found in
    before/around/after-advices will be used.
FLAG ::= `protect'|`disable'|`activate'|`compile'|`preactivate'.
    All flags can be specified with unambiguous initial substrings.
DOCSTRING ::= Optional documentation for this piece of advice.
INTERACTIVE-FORM ::= Optional interactive form to be used for the advised
    function.  The first one found in before/around/after-advices will be used.
BODY ::= Any s-expression.

Semantics of the various flags:
`protect': The piece of advice will be protected against non-local exits in
any code that precedes it.  If any around-advice of a function is protected
then automatically all around-advices will be protected (the complete onion).

`activate': All advice of FUNCTION will be activated immediately if
FUNCTION has been properly defined prior to this application of `defadvice'.

`compile': In conjunction with `activate' specifies that the resulting
advised function should be compiled.

`disable': The defined advice will be disabled, hence, it will not be used
during activation until somebody enables it.

`preactivate': Preactivates the advised FUNCTION at macro-expansion/compile
time.  This generates a compiled advised definition according to the current
advice state that will be used during activation if appropriate.  Only use
this if the `defadvice' gets actually compiled.

usage: (defadvice FUNCTION (CLASS NAME [POSITION] [ARGLIST] FLAG...)
          [DOCSTRING] [INTERACTIVE-FORM]
          BODY...)

\(fn FUNCTION ARGS &rest BODY)" nil t)

(function-put 'defadvice 'doc-string-elt '3)

(function-put 'defadvice 'lisp-indent-function '2)

(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "advice" '("ad-")))

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "align" "align.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from align.el

(autoload 'align "align" "\
Attempt to align a region based on a set of alignment rules.
BEG and END mark the region.  If BEG and END are specifically set to
nil (this can only be done programmatically), the beginning and end of
the current alignment section will be calculated based on the location
of point, and the value of `align-region-separate' (or possibly each
rule's `separate' attribute).

If SEPARATE is non-nil, it overrides the value of
`align-region-separate' for all rules, except those that have their
`separate' attribute set.

RULES and EXCLUDE-RULES, if either is non-nil, will replace the
default rule lists defined in `align-rules-list' and
`align-exclude-rules-list'.  See `align-rules-list' for more details
on the format of these lists.

\(fn BEG END &optional SEPARATE RULES EXCLUDE-RULES)" t nil)

(autoload 'align-regexp "align" "\
Align the current region using an ad-hoc rule read from the minibuffer.
BEG and END mark the limits of the region.  Interactively, this function
prompts for the regular expression REGEXP to align with.

For example, let's say you had a list of phone numbers, and wanted to
align them so that the opening parentheses would line up:

    Fred (123) 456-7890
    Alice (123) 456-7890
    Mary-Anne (123) 456-7890
    Joe (123) 456-7890

There is no predefined rule to handle this, but you could easily do it
using a REGEXP like \"(\".  Interactively, all you would have to do is
to mark the region, call `align-regexp' and enter that regular expression.

REGEXP must contain at least one parenthesized subexpression, typically
whitespace of the form \"\\\\(\\\\s-*\\\\)\".  In normal interactive use,
this is automatically added to the start of your regular expression after
you enter it.  You only need to supply the characters to be lined up, and
any preceding whitespace is replaced.

If you specify a prefix argument (or use this function non-interactively),
you must enter the full regular expression, including the subexpression.
The function also then prompts for which subexpression parenthesis GROUP
\(default 1) within REGEXP to modify, the amount of SPACING (default
`align-default-spacing') to use, and whether or not to REPEAT the rule
throughout the line.

See `align-rules-list' for more information about these options.

The non-interactive form of the previous example would look something like:
  (align-regexp (point-min) (point-max) \"\\\\(\\\\s-*\\\\)(\")

This function is a nothing more than a small wrapper that helps you
construct a rule to pass to `align-region', which does the real work.

\(fn BEG END REGEXP &optional GROUP SPACING REPEAT)" t nil)

(autoload 'align-entire "align" "\
Align the selected region as if it were one alignment section.
BEG and END mark the extent of the region.  If RULES or EXCLUDE-RULES
is set to a list of rules (see `align-rules-list'), it can be used to
override the default alignment rules that would have been used to
align that section.

\(fn BEG END &optional RULES EXCLUDE-RULES)" t nil)

(autoload 'align-current "align" "\
Call `align' on the current alignment section.
This function assumes you want to align only the current section, and
so saves you from having to specify the region.  If RULES or
EXCLUDE-RULES is set to a list of rules (see `align-rules-list'), it
can be used to override the default alignment rules that would have
been used to align that section.

\(fn &optional RULES EXCLUDE-RULES)" t nil)

(autoload 'align-highlight-rule "align" "\
Highlight the whitespace which a given rule would have modified.
BEG and END mark the extent of the region.  TITLE identifies the rule
that should be highlighted.  If RULES or EXCLUDE-RULES is set to a
list of rules (see `align-rules-list'), it can be used to override the
default alignment rules that would have been used to identify the text
to be colored.

\(fn BEG END TITLE &optional RULES EXCLUDE-RULES)" t nil)

(autoload 'align-unhighlight-rule "align" "\
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Remove any highlighting that was added by `align-highlight-rule'." t nil)
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(autoload 'align-newline-and-indent "align" "\
A replacement function for `newline-and-indent', aligning as it goes.
The alignment is done by calling `align' on the region that was
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indented." t nil)
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(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "align" '("align-")))

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "allout" "allout.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from allout.el
(push (purecopy '(allout 2 3)) package--builtin-versions)

(autoload 'allout-auto-activation-helper "allout" "\
Institute `allout-auto-activation'.

Intended to be used as the `allout-auto-activation' :set function.

\(fn VAR VALUE)" nil nil)

(autoload 'allout-setup "allout" "\
Do fundamental Emacs session for allout auto-activation.

Establishes allout processing as part of visiting a file if
`allout-auto-activation' is non-nil, or removes it otherwise.

The proper way to use this is through customizing the setting of
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`allout-auto-activation'." nil nil)
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(defvar allout-auto-activation nil "\
Configure allout outline mode auto-activation.

Control whether and how allout outline mode is automatically
activated when files are visited with non-nil buffer-specific
file variable `allout-layout'.

When allout-auto-activation is \"On\" (t), allout mode is
activated in buffers with non-nil `allout-layout', and the
specified layout is applied.

With value \"ask\", auto-mode-activation is enabled, and endorsement for
performing auto-layout is asked of the user each time.

With value \"activate\", only auto-mode-activation is enabled.
Auto-layout is not.

With value nil, inhibit any automatic allout-mode activation.")

(custom-autoload 'allout-auto-activation "allout" nil)

(put 'allout-use-hanging-indents 'safe-local-variable (if (fboundp 'booleanp) 'booleanp (lambda (x) (member x '(t nil)))))

(put 'allout-reindent-bodies 'safe-local-variable (lambda (x) (memq x '(nil t text force))))

(put 'allout-show-bodies 'safe-local-variable (if (fboundp 'booleanp) 'booleanp (lambda (x) (member x '(t nil)))))

(put 'allout-header-prefix 'safe-local-variable 'stringp)

(put 'allout-primary-bullet 'safe-local-variable 'stringp)

(put 'allout-plain-bullets-string 'safe-local-variable 'stringp)

(put 'allout-distinctive-bullets-string 'safe-local-variable 'stringp)

(put 'allout-use-mode-specific-leader 'safe-local-variable (lambda (x) (or (memq x '(t nil allout-mode-leaders comment-start)) (stringp x))))

(put 'allout-old-style-prefixes 'safe-local-variable (if (fboundp 'booleanp) 'booleanp (lambda (x) (member x '(t nil)))))

(put 'allout-stylish-prefixes 'safe-local-variable (if (fboundp 'booleanp) 'booleanp (lambda (x) (member x '(t nil)))))

(put 'allout-numbered-bullet 'safe-local-variable (if (fboundp 'string-or-null-p) 'string-or-null-p (lambda (x) (or (stringp x) (null x)))))

(put 'allout-file-xref-bullet 'safe-local-variable (if (fboundp 'string-or-null-p) 'string-or-null-p (lambda (x) (or (stringp x) (null x)))))

(put 'allout-presentation-padding 'safe-local-variable 'integerp)

(put 'allout-layout 'safe-local-variable (lambda (x) (or (numberp x) (listp x) (memq x '(: * + -)))))

(autoload 'allout-mode-p "allout" "\
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Return t if `allout-mode' is active in current buffer." nil t)
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(autoload 'allout-mode "allout" "\
Toggle Allout outline mode.
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If called interactively, enable Allout mode if ARG is positive, and
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disable it if ARG is zero or negative.  If called from Lisp, also
enable the mode if ARG is omitted or nil, and toggle it if ARG is
`toggle'; disable the mode otherwise.
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\\<allout-mode-map-value>
Allout outline mode is a minor mode that provides extensive
outline oriented formatting and manipulation.  It enables
structural editing of outlines, as well as navigation and
exposure.  It also is specifically aimed at accommodating
syntax-sensitive text like programming languages.  (For example,
see the allout code itself, which is organized as an allout
outline.)

In addition to typical outline navigation and exposure, allout includes:

 - topic-oriented authoring, including keystroke-based topic creation,
   repositioning, promotion/demotion, cut, and paste
 - incremental search with dynamic exposure and reconcealment of hidden text
 - adjustable format, so programming code can be developed in outline-structure
 - easy topic encryption and decryption, symmetric or key-pair
 - \"Hot-spot\" operation, for single-keystroke maneuvering and exposure control
 - integral outline layout, for automatic initial exposure when visiting a file
 - independent extensibility, using comprehensive exposure and authoring hooks

and many other features.

Below is a description of the key bindings, and then description
of special `allout-mode' features and terminology.  See also the
outline menubar additions for quick reference to many of the
features.  Customize `allout-auto-activation' to prepare your
Emacs session for automatic activation of `allout-mode'.

The bindings are those listed in `allout-prefixed-keybindings'
and `allout-unprefixed-keybindings'.  We recommend customizing
`allout-command-prefix' to use just `\\C-c' as the command
prefix, if the allout bindings don't conflict with any personal
bindings you have on \\C-c.  In any case, outline structure
navigation and authoring is simplified by positioning the cursor
on an item's bullet character, the \"hot-spot\" -- then you can
invoke allout commands with just the un-prefixed,
un-control-shifted command letters.  This is described further in
the HOT-SPOT Operation section.

        Exposure Control:
        ----------------
\\[allout-hide-current-subtree]   `allout-hide-current-subtree'
\\[allout-show-children] `allout-show-children'
\\[allout-show-current-subtree] `allout-show-current-subtree'
\\[allout-show-current-entry] `allout-show-current-entry'
\\[allout-show-all]   `allout-show-all'

        Navigation:
        ----------
\\[allout-next-visible-heading] `allout-next-visible-heading'
\\[allout-previous-visible-heading] `allout-previous-visible-heading'
\\[allout-up-current-level] `allout-up-current-level'
\\[allout-forward-current-level] `allout-forward-current-level'
\\[allout-backward-current-level] `allout-backward-current-level'
\\[allout-end-of-entry] `allout-end-of-entry'
\\[allout-beginning-of-current-entry] `allout-beginning-of-current-entry' (alternately, goes to hot-spot)
\\[allout-beginning-of-line]  `allout-beginning-of-line' -- like regular beginning-of-line, but
     if immediately repeated cycles to the beginning of the current item
     and then to the hot-spot (if `allout-beginning-of-line-cycles' is set).


        Topic Header Production:
        -----------------------
\\[allout-open-sibtopic] `allout-open-sibtopic' Create a new sibling after current topic.
\\[allout-open-subtopic]   `allout-open-subtopic' ... an offspring of current topic.
\\[allout-open-supertopic] `allout-open-supertopic' ... a sibling of the current topic's parent.

        Topic Level and Prefix Adjustment:
        ---------------------------------
\\[allout-shift-in] `allout-shift-in'   Shift current topic and all offspring deeper
\\[allout-shift-out] `allout-shift-out' ... less deep
\\[allout-rebullet-current-heading] `allout-rebullet-current-heading' Prompt for alternate bullet for
            current topic
\\[allout-rebullet-topic] `allout-rebullet-topic'   Reconcile bullets of topic and
            its offspring -- distinctive bullets are not changed, others
            are alternated according to nesting depth.
\\[allout-number-siblings] `allout-number-siblings'  Number bullets of topic and siblings --
           the offspring are not affected.
           With repeat count, revoke numbering.

        Topic-oriented Killing and Yanking:
        ----------------------------------
\\[allout-kill-topic] `allout-kill-topic'   Kill current topic, including offspring.
\\[allout-copy-topic-as-kill] `allout-copy-topic-as-kill' Copy current topic, including offspring.
\\[allout-kill-line]     `allout-kill-line'    Kill line, attending to outline structure.
\\[allout-copy-line-as-kill]     `allout-copy-line-as-kill' Copy line but don't delete it.
\\[allout-yank] `allout-yank'        Yank, adjusting depth of yanked topic to
                             depth of heading if yanking into bare topic
                             heading (ie, prefix sans text).
\\[allout-yank-pop]     `allout-yank-pop'       Is to `allout-yank' as `yank-pop' is to `yank'.

        Topic-oriented Encryption:
        -------------------------
\\[allout-toggle-current-subtree-encryption] `allout-toggle-current-subtree-encryption'
          Encrypt/Decrypt topic content

        Misc commands:
        -------------
M-x outlineify-sticky       Activate outline mode for current buffer,
                            and establish a default file-var setting
                            for `allout-layout'.
\\[allout-mark-topic]       `allout-mark-topic'
\\[allout-copy-exposed-to-buffer] `allout-copy-exposed-to-buffer'
                            Duplicate outline, sans concealed text, to
                            buffer with name derived from derived from that
                            of current buffer -- \"*BUFFERNAME exposed*\".
\\[allout-flatten-exposed-to-buffer] `allout-flatten-exposed-to-buffer'
                            Like above `copy-exposed', but convert topic
                            prefixes to section.subsection... numeric
                            format.
\\[customize-variable] allout-auto-activation
                            Prepare Emacs session for allout outline mode
                            auto-activation.

                  Topic Encryption

Outline mode supports gpg encryption of topics, with support for
symmetric and key-pair modes, and auto-encryption of topics
pending encryption on save.

Topics pending encryption are, by default, automatically
encrypted during file saves, including checkpoint saves, to avoid
exposing the plain text of encrypted topics in the file system.
If the content of the topic containing the cursor was encrypted
for a save, it is automatically decrypted for continued editing.

NOTE: A few GnuPG v2 versions improperly preserve incorrect
symmetric decryption keys, preventing entry of the correct key on
subsequent decryption attempts until the cache times-out.  That
can take several minutes.  (Decryption of other entries is not
affected.)  Upgrade your EasyPG version, if you can, and you can
deliberately clear your gpg-agent's cache by sending it a `-HUP'
signal.

See `allout-toggle-current-subtree-encryption' function docstring
and `allout-encrypt-unencrypted-on-saves' customization variable
for details.

                 HOT-SPOT Operation

Hot-spot operation provides a means for easy, single-keystroke outline
navigation and exposure control.

When the text cursor is positioned directly on the bullet character of
a topic, regular characters (a to z) invoke the commands of the
corresponding allout-mode keymap control chars.  For example, \"f\"
would invoke the command typically bound to \"C-c<space>C-f\"
\(\\[allout-forward-current-level] `allout-forward-current-level').

Thus, by positioning the cursor on a topic bullet, you can
execute the outline navigation and manipulation commands with a
single keystroke.  Regular navigation keys (eg, \\[forward-char], \\[next-line]) don't get
this special translation, so you can use them to get out of the
hot-spot and back to normal editing operation.

In allout-mode, the normal beginning-of-line command (\\[allout-beginning-of-line]) is
replaced with one that makes it easy to get to the hot-spot.  If you
repeat it immediately it cycles (if `allout-beginning-of-line-cycles'
is set) to the beginning of the item and then, if you hit it again
immediately, to the hot-spot.  Similarly, `allout-beginning-of-current-entry'
\(\\[allout-beginning-of-current-entry]) moves to the hot-spot when the cursor is already located
at the beginning of the current entry.

                             Extending Allout

Allout exposure and authoring activities all have associated
hooks, by which independent code can cooperate with allout
without changes to the allout core.  Here are key ones:

`allout-mode-hook'
`allout-mode-deactivate-hook' (deprecated)
`allout-mode-off-hook'
`allout-exposure-change-functions'
`allout-structure-added-functions'
`allout-structure-deleted-functions'
`allout-structure-shifted-functions'
`allout-after-copy-or-kill-hook'
`allout-post-undo-hook'

                            Terminology

Topic hierarchy constituents -- TOPICS and SUBTOPICS:

ITEM:   A unitary outline element, including the HEADER and ENTRY text.
TOPIC:  An ITEM and any ITEMs contained within it, ie having greater DEPTH
        and with no intervening items of lower DEPTH than the container.
CURRENT ITEM:
        The visible ITEM most immediately containing the cursor.
DEPTH:  The degree of nesting of an ITEM; it increases with containment.
        The DEPTH is determined by the HEADER PREFIX.  The DEPTH is also
        called the:
LEVEL:  The same as DEPTH.

ANCESTORS:
        Those ITEMs whose TOPICs contain an ITEM.
PARENT: An ITEM's immediate ANCESTOR.  It has a DEPTH one less than that
        of the ITEM.
OFFSPRING:
        The ITEMs contained within an ITEM's TOPIC.
SUBTOPIC:
        An OFFSPRING of its ANCESTOR TOPICs.
CHILD:
        An immediate SUBTOPIC of its PARENT.
SIBLINGS:
        TOPICs having the same PARENT and DEPTH.

Topic text constituents:

HEADER: The first line of an ITEM, include the ITEM PREFIX and HEADER
        text.
ENTRY:  The text content of an ITEM, before any OFFSPRING, but including
        the HEADER text and distinct from the ITEM PREFIX.
BODY:   Same as ENTRY.
PREFIX: The leading text of an ITEM which distinguishes it from normal
        ENTRY text.  Allout recognizes the outline structure according
        to the strict PREFIX format.  It consists of a PREFIX-LEAD string,
        PREFIX-PADDING, and a BULLET.  The BULLET might be followed by a
        number, indicating the ordinal number of the topic among its
        siblings, or an asterisk indicating encryption, plus an optional
        space.  After that is the ITEM HEADER text, which is not part of
        the PREFIX.

        The relative length of the PREFIX determines the nesting DEPTH
        of the ITEM.
PREFIX-LEAD:
        The string at the beginning of a HEADER PREFIX, by default a `.'.
        It can be customized by changing the setting of
        `allout-header-prefix' and then reinitializing `allout-mode'.

        When the PREFIX-LEAD is set to the comment-string of a
        programming language, outline structuring can be embedded in
        program code without interfering with processing of the text
        (by Emacs or the language processor) as program code.  This
        setting happens automatically when allout mode is used in
        programming-mode buffers.  See `allout-use-mode-specific-leader'
        docstring for more detail.
PREFIX-PADDING:
        Spaces or asterisks which separate the PREFIX-LEAD and the
        bullet, determining the ITEM's DEPTH.
BULLET: A character at the end of the ITEM PREFIX, it must be one of
        the characters listed on `allout-plain-bullets-string' or
        `allout-distinctive-bullets-string'.  When creating a TOPIC,
        plain BULLETs are by default used, according to the DEPTH of the
        TOPIC.  Choice among the distinctive BULLETs is offered when you
        provide a universal argument (\\[universal-argument]) to the
        TOPIC creation command, or when explicitly rebulleting a TOPIC.  The
        significance of the various distinctive bullets is purely by
        convention.  See the documentation for the above bullet strings for
        more details.
EXPOSURE:
        The state of a TOPIC which determines the on-screen visibility
        of its OFFSPRING and contained ENTRY text.
CONCEALED:
        TOPICs and ENTRY text whose EXPOSURE is inhibited.  Concealed
        text is represented by \"...\" ellipses.

        CONCEALED TOPICs are effectively collapsed within an ANCESTOR.
CLOSED: A TOPIC whose immediate OFFSPRING and body-text is CONCEALED.
OPEN:	A TOPIC that is not CLOSED, though its OFFSPRING or BODY may be.

\(fn &optional ARG)" t nil)

(defalias 'outlinify-sticky 'outlineify-sticky)

(autoload 'outlineify-sticky "allout" "\
Activate outline mode and establish file var so it is started subsequently.

See `allout-layout' and customization of `allout-auto-activation'
for details on preparing Emacs for automatic allout activation.

\(fn &optional ARG)" t nil)

(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "allout" '("allout-")))

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "allout-widgets" "allout-widgets.el" (0 0 0
;;;;;;  0))
;;; Generated autoloads from allout-widgets.el
(push (purecopy '(allout-widgets 1 0)) package--builtin-versions)

(autoload 'allout-widgets-setup "allout-widgets" "\
Commission or decommission allout-widgets-mode along with allout-mode.

Meant to be used by customization of `allout-widgets-auto-activation'.

\(fn VARNAME VALUE)" nil nil)

(defvar allout-widgets-auto-activation nil "\
Activate to enable allout icon graphics wherever allout mode is active.

Also enable `allout-auto-activation' for this to take effect upon
visiting an outline.

When this is set you can disable allout widgets in select files
814
by setting `allout-widgets-mode-inhibit'.
815 816 817 818 819 820 821 822 823 824 825 826 827

Instead of setting `allout-widgets-auto-activation' you can
explicitly invoke `allout-widgets-mode' in allout buffers where
you want allout widgets operation.

See `allout-widgets-mode' for allout widgets mode features.")

(custom-autoload 'allout-widgets-auto-activation "allout-widgets" nil)

(put 'allout-widgets-mode-inhibit 'safe-local-variable (if (fboundp 'booleanp) 'booleanp (lambda (x) (member x '(t nil)))))

(autoload 'allout-widgets-mode "allout-widgets" "\
Toggle Allout Widgets mode.
828

829 830 831 832
If called interactively, enable Allout-Widgets mode if ARG is
positive, and disable it if ARG is zero or negative.  If called from
Lisp, also enable the mode if ARG is omitted or nil, and toggle it if
ARG is `toggle'; disable the mode otherwise.
833 834 835 836 837 838 839 840 841 842 843 844 845 846 847 848 849 850 851 852 853 854 855 856 857 858 859 860 861 862 863 864 865 866 867 868 869 870 871 872 873 874 875 876

Allout Widgets mode is an extension of Allout mode that provides
graphical decoration of outline structure.  It is meant to
operate along with `allout-mode', via `allout-mode-hook'.

The graphics include:

- guide lines connecting item bullet-icons with those of their subitems.

- icons for item bullets, varying to indicate whether or not the item
  has subitems, and if so, whether or not the item is expanded.

- cue area between the bullet-icon and the start of the body headline,
  for item numbering, encryption indicator, and distinctive bullets.

The bullet-icon and guide line graphics provide keybindings and mouse
bindings for easy outline navigation and exposure control, extending
outline hot-spot navigation (see `allout-mode').

\(fn &optional ARG)" t nil)

(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "allout-widgets" '("allout-")))

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "ange-ftp" "net/ange-ftp.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from net/ange-ftp.el

(defalias 'ange-ftp-re-read-dir 'ange-ftp-reread-dir)

(autoload 'ange-ftp-reread-dir "ange-ftp" "\
Reread remote directory DIR to update the directory cache.
The implementation of remote FTP file names caches directory contents
for speed.  Therefore, when new remote files are created, Emacs
may not know they exist.  You can use this command to reread a specific
directory, so that Emacs will know its current contents.

\(fn &optional DIR)" t nil)

(autoload 'ange-ftp-hook-function "ange-ftp" "\


\(fn OPERATION &rest ARGS)" nil nil)

877
(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "ange-ftp" '("ange-ftp-" "ftp-error" "internal-ange-ftp-mode")))
878 879 880 881 882 883 884 885 886 887 888 889 890 891 892 893 894 895 896 897 898 899 900 901 902 903 904 905 906 907 908 909 910 911 912 913 914 915 916 917 918 919

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "animate" "play/animate.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from play/animate.el

(autoload 'animate-string "animate" "\
Display STRING animations starting at position VPOS, HPOS.
The characters start at randomly chosen places,
and all slide in parallel to their final positions,
passing through `animate-n-steps' positions before the final ones.
If HPOS is nil (or omitted), center the string horizontally
in the current window.

\(fn STRING VPOS &optional HPOS)" nil nil)

(autoload 'animate-sequence "animate" "\
Display animation strings from LIST-OF-STRING with buffer *Animation*.
Strings will be separated from each other by SPACE lines.
 When the variable `animation-buffer-name' is non-nil display
animation in the buffer named by variable's value, creating the
buffer if one does not exist.

\(fn LIST-OF-STRINGS SPACE)" nil nil)

(autoload 'animate-birthday-present "animate" "\
Return a birthday present in the buffer *Birthday-Present*.
When optional arg NAME is non-nil or called-interactively, prompt for
NAME of birthday present receiver and return a birthday present in
the buffer *Birthday-Present-for-Name*.

\(fn &optional NAME)" t nil)

(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "animate" '("animat")))

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "ansi-color" "ansi-color.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from ansi-color.el
(push (purecopy '(ansi-color 3 4 2)) package--builtin-versions)

(autoload 'ansi-color-for-comint-mode-on "ansi-color" "\
920
Set `ansi-color-for-comint-mode' to t." t nil)
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(autoload 'ansi-color-process-output "ansi-color" "\
Maybe translate SGR control sequences of comint output into text properties.

Depending on variable `ansi-color-for-comint-mode' the comint output is
either not processed, SGR control sequences are filtered using
`ansi-color-filter-region', or SGR control sequences are translated into
text properties using `ansi-color-apply-on-region'.

The comint output is assumed to lie between the marker
`comint-last-output-start' and the process-mark.

This is a good function to put in `comint-output-filter-functions'.

\(fn IGNORED)" nil nil)

(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "ansi-color" '("ansi-color-")))

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "antlr-mode" "progmodes/antlr-mode.el" (0 0
;;;;;;  0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from progmodes/antlr-mode.el
(push (purecopy '(antlr-mode 2 2 3)) package--builtin-versions)

(autoload 'antlr-show-makefile-rules "antlr-mode" "\
Show Makefile rules for all grammar files in the current directory.
If the `major-mode' of the current buffer has the value `makefile-mode',
the rules are directory inserted at point.  Otherwise, a *Help* buffer
is shown with the rules which are also put into the `kill-ring' for
\\[yank].

This command considers import/export vocabularies and grammar
inheritance and provides a value for the \"-glib\" option if necessary.
Customize variable `antlr-makefile-specification' for the appearance of
the rules.

If the file for a super-grammar cannot be determined, special file names
are used according to variable `antlr-unknown-file-formats' and a
commentary with value `antlr-help-unknown-file-text' is added.  The
961
*Help* buffer always starts with the text in `antlr-help-rules-intro'." t nil)
962 963 964 965 966 967 968 969

(autoload 'antlr-mode "antlr-mode" "\
Major mode for editing ANTLR grammar files.

\(fn)" t nil)

(autoload 'antlr-set-tabs "antlr-mode" "\
Use ANTLR's convention for TABs according to `antlr-tab-offset-alist'.
970
Used in `antlr-mode'.  Also a useful function in `java-mode-hook'." nil nil)
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(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "antlr-mode" '("antlr-")))

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "appt" "calendar/appt.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from calendar/appt.el

(autoload 'appt-add "appt" "\
Add an appointment for today at TIME with message MSG.
The time should be in either 24 hour format or am/pm format.
Optional argument WARNTIME is an integer (or string) giving the number
of minutes before the appointment at which to start warning.
The default is `appt-message-warning-time'.

\(fn TIME MSG &optional WARNTIME)" t nil)

(autoload 'appt-activate "appt" "\
Toggle checking of appointments.
With optional numeric argument ARG, turn appointment checking on if
ARG is positive, otherwise off.

\(fn &optional ARG)" t nil)

(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "appt" '("appt-")))

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "apropos" "apropos.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from apropos.el

(autoload 'apropos-read-pattern "apropos" "\
Read an apropos pattern, either a word list or a regexp.
Returns the user pattern, either a list of words which are matched
literally, or a string which is used as a regexp to search for.

SUBJECT is a string that is included in the prompt to identify what
kind of objects to search.

\(fn SUBJECT)" nil nil)

(autoload 'apropos-user-option "apropos" "\
Show user options that match PATTERN.
PATTERN can be a word, a list of words (separated by spaces),
or a regexp (using some regexp special characters).  If it is a word,
search for matches for that word as a substring.  If it is a list of words,
search for matches for any two (or more) of those words.

With \\[universal-argument] prefix, or if `apropos-do-all' is non-nil, also show
variables, not just user options.

\(fn PATTERN &optional DO-ALL)" t nil)

(autoload 'apropos-variable "apropos" "\
Show variables that match PATTERN.
With the optional argument DO-NOT-ALL non-nil (or when called
interactively with the prefix \\[universal-argument]), show user
options only, i.e. behave like `apropos-user-option'.

\(fn PATTERN &optional DO-NOT-ALL)" t nil)

1032 1033 1034 1035 1036 1037 1038 1039 1040
(autoload 'apropos-local-variable "apropos" "\
Show buffer-local variables that match PATTERN.
Optional arg BUFFER (default: current buffer) is the buffer to check.

The output includes variables that are not yet set in BUFFER, but that
will be buffer-local when set.

\(fn PATTERN &optional BUFFER)" t nil)

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(defalias 'command-apropos 'apropos-command)

(autoload 'apropos-command "apropos" "\
Show commands (interactively callable functions) that match PATTERN.
PATTERN can be a word, a list of words (separated by spaces),
or a regexp (using some regexp special characters).  If it is a word,
search for matches for that word as a substring.  If it is a list of words,
search for matches for any two (or more) of those words.

With \\[universal-argument] prefix, or if `apropos-do-all' is non-nil, also show
noninteractive functions.

If VAR-PREDICATE is non-nil, show only variables, and only those that
satisfy the predicate VAR-PREDICATE.

When called from a Lisp program, a string PATTERN is used as a regexp,
while a list of strings is used as a word list.

\(fn PATTERN &optional DO-ALL VAR-PREDICATE)" t nil)

(autoload 'apropos-documentation-property "apropos" "\
Like (documentation-property SYMBOL PROPERTY RAW) but handle errors.

\(fn SYMBOL PROPERTY RAW)" nil nil)

(autoload 'apropos "apropos" "\
Show all meaningful Lisp symbols whose names match PATTERN.
Symbols are shown if they are defined as functions, variables, or
faces, or if they have nonempty property lists.

PATTERN can be a word, a list of words (separated by spaces),
or a regexp (using some regexp special characters).  If it is a word,
search for matches for that word as a substring.  If it is a list of words,
search for matches for any two (or more) of those words.

With \\[universal-argument] prefix, or if `apropos-do-all' is non-nil,
consider all symbols (if they match PATTERN).

Returns list of symbols and documentation found.

\(fn PATTERN &optional DO-ALL)" t nil)

(autoload 'apropos-library "apropos" "\
List the variables and functions defined by library FILE.
FILE should be one of the libraries currently loaded and should
thus be found in `load-history'.  If `apropos-do-all' is non-nil,
the output includes key-bindings of commands.

\(fn FILE)" t nil)

(autoload 'apropos-value "apropos" "\
Show all symbols whose value's printed representation matches PATTERN.
PATTERN can be a word, a list of words (separated by spaces),
or a regexp (using some regexp special characters).  If it is a word,
search for matches for that word as a substring.  If it is a list of words,
search for matches for any two (or more) of those words.

With \\[universal-argument] prefix, or if `apropos-do-all' is non-nil, also looks
at function definitions (arguments, documentation and body) and at the
names and values of properties.

Returns list of symbols and values found.

\(fn PATTERN &optional DO-ALL)" t nil)

1106 1107 1108 1109 1110 1111 1112
(autoload 'apropos-local-value "apropos" "\
Show buffer-local variables whose values match PATTERN.
This is like `apropos-value', but only for buffer-local variables.
Optional arg BUFFER (default: current buffer) is the buffer to check.

\(fn PATTERN &optional BUFFER)" t nil)

1113 1114 1115 1116 1117 1118 1119 1120 1121 1122 1123 1124 1125 1126 1127 1128 1129 1130 1131 1132 1133 1134 1135 1136 1137 1138 1139 1140 1141 1142 1143 1144 1145 1146 1147 1148 1149 1150
(autoload 'apropos-documentation "apropos" "\
Show symbols whose documentation contains matches for PATTERN.
PATTERN can be a word, a list of words (separated by spaces),
or a regexp (using some regexp special characters).  If it is a word,
search for matches for that word as a substring.  If it is a list of words,
search for matches for any two (or more) of those words.

Note that by default this command only searches in the file specified by
`internal-doc-file-name'; i.e., the etc/DOC file.  With \\[universal-argument] prefix,
or if `apropos-do-all' is non-nil, it searches all currently defined
documentation strings.

Returns list of symbols and documentation found.

\(fn PATTERN &optional DO-ALL)" t nil)

(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "apropos" '("apropos-")))

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "arc-mode" "arc-mode.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from arc-mode.el

(autoload 'archive-mode "arc-mode" "\
Major mode for viewing an archive file in a dired-like way.
You can move around using the usual cursor motion commands.
Letters no longer insert themselves.
Type `e' to pull a file out of the archive and into its own buffer;
or click mouse-2 on the file's line in the archive mode buffer.

If you edit a sub-file of this archive (as with the `e' command) and
save it, the contents of that buffer will be saved back into the
archive.

\\{archive-mode-map}

\(fn &optional FORCE)" nil nil)

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(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "arc-mode" '("arc")))
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;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "array" "array.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from array.el

(autoload 'array-mode "array" "\
Major mode for editing arrays.

  Array mode is a specialized mode for editing arrays.  An array is
considered to be a two-dimensional set of strings.  The strings are
NOT recognized as integers or real numbers.

  The array MUST reside at the top of the buffer.

  TABs are not respected, and may be converted into spaces at any time.
Setting the variable `array-respect-tabs' to non-nil will prevent TAB conversion,
but will cause many functions to give errors if they encounter one.

  Upon entering array mode, you will be prompted for the values of
several variables.  Others will be calculated based on the values you
supply.  These variables are all local to the buffer.  Other buffer
in array mode may have different values assigned to the variables.
The variables are:

Variables you assign:
     array-max-row:          The number of rows in the array.
     array-max-column:       The number of columns in the array.
     array-columns-per-line: The number of columns in the array per line of buffer.
     array-field-width:      The width of each field, in characters.
     array-rows-numbered:    A logical variable describing whether to ignore
                       row numbers in the buffer.

Variables which are calculated:
     array-line-length:      The number of characters in a buffer line.
     array-lines-per-row:    The number of buffer lines used to display each row.

  The following commands are available (an asterisk indicates it may
take a numeric prefix argument):

    *  	\\<array-mode-map>\\[array-forward-column]	  Move forward one column.
    *  	\\[array-backward-column]	  Move backward one column.
    *  	\\[array-next-row]	  Move down one row.
    *  	\\[array-previous-row]	  Move up one row.

    *   \\[array-copy-forward]	  Copy the current field into the column to the right.
    *   \\[array-copy-backward]	  Copy the current field into the column to the left.
    *   \\[array-copy-down]	  Copy the current field into the row below.
    *   \\[array-copy-up]	  Copy the current field into the row above.

    *   \\[array-copy-column-forward]   Copy the current column into the column to the right.
    *   \\[array-copy-column-backward]   Copy the current column into the column to the left.
    *   \\[array-copy-row-down]   Copy the current row into the row below.
    *   \\[array-copy-row-up]   Copy the current row into the row above.

        \\[array-fill-rectangle]   Copy the field at mark into every cell with row and column
                  between that of point and mark.

	\\[array-what-position]	  Display the current array row and column.
	\\[array-goto-cell]	  Go to a particular array cell.

	\\[array-make-template]	  Make a template for a new array.
	\\[array-reconfigure-rows]	  Reconfigure the array.
        \\[array-expand-rows]   Expand the array (remove row numbers and
                  newlines inside rows)

        \\[array-display-local-variables]   Display the current values of local variables.

Entering array mode calls the function `array-mode-hook'.

\(fn)" t nil)

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;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "artist" "textmodes/artist.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from textmodes/artist.el
(push (purecopy '(artist 1 2 6)) package--builtin-versions)

(autoload 'artist-mode "artist" "\
Toggle Artist mode.
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If called interactively, enable Artist mode if ARG is positive, and
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disable it if ARG is zero or negative.  If called from Lisp, also
enable the mode if ARG is omitted or nil, and toggle it if ARG is
`toggle'; disable the mode otherwise.
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Artist lets you draw lines, squares, rectangles and poly-lines,
ellipses and circles with your mouse and/or keyboard.

How to quit Artist mode

 Type \\[artist-mode-off] to quit artist-mode.


How to submit a bug report

 Type \\[artist-submit-bug-report] to submit a bug report.


Drawing with the mouse:

 mouse-2
 shift mouse-2	Pops up a menu where you can select what to draw with
		mouse-1, and where you can do some settings (described
		below).

 mouse-1
 shift mouse-1	Draws lines, rectangles or poly-lines, erases, cuts, copies
		or pastes:

		Operation	Not shifted		  Shifted
		--------------------------------------------------------------
                Pen             fill-char at point        line from last point
                                                          to new point
		--------------------------------------------------------------
		Line		Line in any direction	  Straight line
		--------------------------------------------------------------
		Rectangle	Rectangle		  Square
		--------------------------------------------------------------
		Poly-line	Poly-line in any dir	  Straight poly-lines
		--------------------------------------------------------------
		Ellipses	Ellipses		  Circles
		--------------------------------------------------------------
		Text		Text (see thru)		  Text (overwrite)
		--------------------------------------------------------------
		Spray-can	Spray-can		  Set size for spray
		--------------------------------------------------------------
		Erase		Erase character		  Erase rectangle
		--------------------------------------------------------------
		Vaporize	Erase single line	  Erase connected
							  lines
		--------------------------------------------------------------
		Cut		Cut rectangle		  Cut square
		--------------------------------------------------------------
		Copy		Copy rectangle		  Copy square
		--------------------------------------------------------------
		Paste		Paste			  Paste
		--------------------------------------------------------------
		Flood-fill	Flood-fill		  Flood-fill
		--------------------------------------------------------------

		* Straight lines can only go horizontally, vertically
		  or diagonally.

		* Poly-lines are drawn while holding mouse-1 down.  When you
		  release the button, the point is set.  If you want a segment
		  to be straight, hold down shift before pressing the
		  mouse-1 button.  Click mouse-2 or mouse-3 to stop drawing
		  poly-lines.

		* See thru for text means that text already in the buffer
		  will be visible through blanks in the text rendered, while
		  overwrite means the opposite.

		* Vaporizing connected lines only vaporizes lines whose
		  _endpoints_ are connected.  See also the variable
		  `artist-vaporize-fuzziness'.

		* Cut copies, then clears the rectangle/square.

		* When drawing lines or poly-lines, you can set arrows.
		  See below under \"Arrows\" for more info.

		* The mode line shows the currently selected drawing operation.
		  In addition, if it has an asterisk (*) at the end, you
		  are currently drawing something.

		* Be patient when flood-filling -- large areas take quite
		  some time to fill.


 mouse-3	Erases character under pointer
 shift mouse-3	Erases rectangle


Settings

 Set fill	Sets the character used when filling rectangles/squares

 Set line	Sets the character used when drawing lines

 Erase char	Sets the character used when erasing

 Rubber-banding	Toggles rubber-banding

 Trimming	Toggles trimming of line-endings (that is: when the shape
		is drawn, extraneous white-space at end of lines is removed)

 Borders        Toggles the drawing of line borders around filled shapes


Drawing with keys

 \\[artist-key-set-point]		Does one of the following:
		For lines/rectangles/squares: sets the first/second endpoint
		For poly-lines: sets a point (use C-u \\[artist-key-set-point] to set last point)
		When erase characters: toggles erasing
		When cutting/copying: Sets first/last endpoint of rect/square
		When pasting: Pastes

 \\[artist-select-operation]	Selects what to draw

 Move around with \\[artist-next-line], \\[artist-previous-line], \\[artist-forward-char] and \\[artist-backward-char].

 \\[artist-select-fill-char]	Sets the character to use when filling
 \\[artist-select-line-char]	Sets the character to use when drawing
 \\[artist-select-erase-char]	Sets the character to use when erasing
 \\[artist-toggle-rubber-banding]	Toggles rubber-banding
 \\[artist-toggle-trim-line-endings]	Toggles trimming of line-endings
 \\[artist-toggle-borderless-shapes]	Toggles borders on drawn shapes


Arrows

 \\[artist-toggle-first-arrow]		Sets/unsets an arrow at the beginning
		of the line/poly-line

 \\[artist-toggle-second-arrow]		Sets/unsets an arrow at the end
		of the line/poly-line


Selecting operation

 There are some keys for quickly selecting drawing operations:

 \\[artist-select-op-line]	Selects drawing lines
 \\[artist-select-op-straight-line]	Selects drawing straight lines
 \\[artist-select-op-rectangle]	Selects drawing rectangles
 \\[artist-select-op-square]	Selects drawing squares
 \\[artist-select-op-poly-line]	Selects drawing poly-lines
 \\[artist-select-op-straight-poly-line]	Selects drawing straight poly-lines
 \\[artist-select-op-ellipse]	Selects drawing ellipses
 \\[artist-select-op-circle]	Selects drawing circles
 \\[artist-select-op-text-see-thru]	Selects rendering text (see thru)
 \\[artist-select-op-text-overwrite]	Selects rendering text (overwrite)
 \\[artist-select-op-spray-can]	Spray with spray-can
 \\[artist-select-op-spray-set-size]	Set size for the spray-can
 \\[artist-select-op-erase-char]	Selects erasing characters
 \\[artist-select-op-erase-rectangle]	Selects erasing rectangles
 \\[artist-select-op-vaporize-line]	Selects vaporizing single lines
 \\[artist-select-op-vaporize-lines]	Selects vaporizing connected lines
 \\[artist-select-op-cut-rectangle]	Selects cutting rectangles
 \\[artist-select-op-copy-rectangle]	Selects copying rectangles
 \\[artist-select-op-paste]	Selects pasting
 \\[artist-select-op-flood-fill]	Selects flood-filling


Variables

 This is a brief overview of the different variables.  For more info,
 see the documentation for the variables (type \\[describe-variable] <variable> RET).

 artist-rubber-banding		Interactively do rubber-banding or not
 artist-first-char		What to set at first/second point...
 artist-second-char		...when not rubber-banding
 artist-interface-with-rect	If cut/copy/paste should interface with rect
 artist-arrows			The arrows to use when drawing arrows
 artist-aspect-ratio		Character height-to-width for squares
 artist-trim-line-endings	Trimming of line endings
 artist-flood-fill-right-border	Right border when flood-filling
 artist-flood-fill-show-incrementally	Update display while filling
 artist-pointer-shape		Pointer shape to use while drawing
 artist-ellipse-left-char	Character to use for narrow ellipses
 artist-ellipse-right-char	Character to use for narrow ellipses
 artist-borderless-shapes       If shapes should have borders
 artist-picture-compatibility   Whether or not to be picture mode compatible
 artist-vaporize-fuzziness      Tolerance when recognizing lines
 artist-spray-interval          Seconds between repeated sprayings
 artist-spray-radius            Size of the spray-area
 artist-spray-chars             The spray-\"color\"
 artist-spray-new-chars         Initial spray-\"color\"

Hooks

 Turning the mode on or off runs `artist-mode-hook'.


Keymap summary

\\{artist-mode-map}

\(fn &optional ARG)" t nil)

(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "artist" '("artist-")))

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "asm-mode" "progmodes/asm-mode.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from progmodes/asm-mode.el

(autoload 'asm-mode "asm-mode" "\
Major mode for editing typical assembler code.
Features a private abbrev table and the following bindings:

\\[asm-colon]	outdent a preceding label, tab to next tab stop.
\\[tab-to-tab-stop]	tab to next tab stop.
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\\[newline-and-indent]	newline, then tab to next tab stop.
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\\[asm-comment]	smart placement of assembler comments.

The character used for making comments is set by the variable
`asm-comment-char' (which defaults to `?\\;').

Alternatively, you may set this variable in `asm-mode-set-comment-hook',
which is called near the beginning of mode initialization.

Turning on Asm mode runs the hook `asm-mode-hook' at the end of initialization.

Special commands:
\\{asm-mode-map}

\(fn)" t nil)

(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "asm-mode" '("asm-")))

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "auth-source" "auth-source.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from auth-source.el

(defvar auth-source-cache-expiry 7200 "\
How many seconds passwords are cached, or nil to disable
expiring.  Overrides `password-cache-expiry' through a
let-binding.")

(custom-autoload 'auth-source-cache-expiry "auth-source" t)

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(autoload 'authinfo-mode "auth-source" "\
Mode for editing .authinfo/.netrc files.

This is just like `fundamental-mode', but hides passwords.  The
passwords are revealed when point moved into the password.

\\{authinfo-mode-map}

\(fn)" t nil)

(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "auth-source" '("auth")))
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;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "auth-source-pass" "auth-source-pass.el" (0
;;;;;;  0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from auth-source-pass.el
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(push (purecopy '(auth-source-pass 5 0 0)) package--builtin-versions)
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(autoload 'auth-source-pass-enable "auth-source-pass" "\
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Enable auth-source-password-store." nil nil)
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(autoload 'auth-source-pass-get "auth-source-pass" "\
Return the value associated to KEY in the password-store entry ENTRY.

ENTRY is the name of a password-store entry.
The key used to retrieve the password is the symbol `secret'.

The convention used as the format for a password-store file is
the following (see http://www.passwordstore.org/#organization):

secret
key1: value1
key2: value2

\(fn KEY ENTRY)" nil nil)

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(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "auth-source-pass" '("auth-source-pass-")))

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;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "autoarg" "autoarg.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from autoarg.el

(defvar autoarg-mode nil "\
Non-nil if Autoarg mode is enabled.
See the `autoarg-mode' command
for a description of this minor mode.")

(custom-autoload 'autoarg-mode "autoarg" nil)

(autoload 'autoarg-mode "autoarg" "\
Toggle Autoarg mode, a global minor mode.

\\<autoarg-mode-map>
In Autoarg mode, digits are bound to `digit-argument', i.e. they
supply prefix arguments as C-DIGIT and M-DIGIT normally do.
Furthermore, C-DIGIT inserts DIGIT.
\\[autoarg-terminate] terminates the prefix sequence and inserts
the digits of the autoarg sequence into the buffer.
Without a numeric prefix arg, the normal binding of \\[autoarg-terminate]
is invoked, i.e. what it would be with Autoarg mode off.

For example:
`6 9 \\[autoarg-terminate]' inserts `69' into the buffer, as does `C-6 C-9'.
`6 9 a' inserts 69 `a's into the buffer.
`6 9 \\[autoarg-terminate] \\[autoarg-terminate]' inserts `69' into the buffer and
then invokes the normal binding of \\[autoarg-terminate].
`C-u \\[autoarg-terminate]' invokes the normal binding of \\[autoarg-terminate] four times.

\\{autoarg-mode-map}

\(fn &optional ARG)" t nil)

(defvar autoarg-kp-mode nil "\
Non-nil if Autoarg-Kp mode is enabled.
See the `autoarg-kp-mode' command
for a description of this minor mode.
Setting this variable directly does not take effect;
either customize it (see the info node `Easy Customization')
or call the function `autoarg-kp-mode'.")

(custom-autoload 'autoarg-kp-mode "autoarg" nil)

(autoload 'autoarg-kp-mode "autoarg" "\
Toggle Autoarg-KP mode, a global minor mode.
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If called interactively, enable Autoarg-Kp mode if ARG is positive,
and disable it if ARG is zero or negative.  If called from Lisp, also
enable the mode if ARG is omitted or nil, and toggle it if ARG is
`toggle'; disable the mode otherwise.
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\\<autoarg-kp-mode-map>
This is similar to `autoarg-mode' but rebinds the keypad keys
`kp-1' etc. to supply digit arguments.

\\{autoarg-kp-mode-map}

\(fn &optional ARG)" t nil)

(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "autoarg" '("autoarg-")))

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "autoconf" "progmodes/autoconf.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from progmodes/autoconf.el

(autoload 'autoconf-mode "autoconf" "\
Major mode for editing Autoconf configure.ac files.

\(fn)" t nil)

(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "autoconf" '("autoconf-")))

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "autoinsert" "autoinsert.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from autoinsert.el

(autoload 'auto-insert "autoinsert" "\
Insert default contents into new files if variable `auto-insert' is non-nil.
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Matches the visited file name against the elements of `auto-insert-alist'." t nil)
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(autoload 'define-auto-insert "autoinsert" "\
Associate CONDITION with (additional) ACTION in `auto-insert-alist'.
Optional AFTER means to insert action after all existing actions for CONDITION,
or if CONDITION had no actions, after all other CONDITIONs.

\(fn CONDITION ACTION &optional AFTER)" nil nil)

(defvar auto-insert-mode nil "\
Non-nil if Auto-Insert mode is enabled.
See the `auto-insert-mode' command
for a description of this minor mode.
Setting this variable directly does not take effect;
either customize it (see the info node `Easy Customization')
or call the function `auto-insert-mode'.")

(custom-autoload 'auto-insert-mode "autoinsert" nil)

(autoload 'auto-insert-mode "autoinsert" "\
Toggle Auto-insert mode, a global minor mode.
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If called interactively, enable Auto-Insert mode if ARG is positive,
and disable it if ARG is zero or negative.  If called from Lisp, also
enable the mode if ARG is omitted or nil, and toggle it if ARG is
`toggle'; disable the mode otherwise.
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When Auto-insert mode is enabled, when new files are created you can
insert a template for the file depending on the mode of the buffer.

\(fn &optional ARG)" t nil)

(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "autoinsert" '("auto-insert")))

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "autoload" "emacs-lisp/autoload.el" (0 0 0
;;;;;;  0))
;;; Generated autoloads from emacs-lisp/autoload.el

(put 'generated-autoload-file 'safe-local-variable 'stringp)

(put 'generated-autoload-load-name 'safe-local-variable 'stringp)

(put 'autoload-ensure-writable 'risky-local-variable t)

(autoload 'update-file-autoloads "autoload" "\
Update the autoloads for FILE.
If prefix arg SAVE-AFTER is non-nil, save the buffer too.

If FILE binds `generated-autoload-file' as a file-local variable,
autoloads are written into that file.  Otherwise, the autoloads
file is determined by OUTFILE.  If called interactively, prompt
for OUTFILE; if called from Lisp with OUTFILE nil, use the
existing value of `generated-autoload-file'.

Return FILE if there was no autoload cookie in it, else nil.

\(fn FILE &optional SAVE-AFTER OUTFILE)" t nil)

(autoload 'update-directory-autoloads "autoload" "\
Update autoload definitions for Lisp files in the directories DIRS.
In an interactive call, you must give one argument, the name of a
single directory.  In a call from Lisp, you can supply multiple
directories as separate arguments, but this usage is discouraged.

The function does NOT recursively descend into subdirectories of the
directory or directories specified.

In an interactive call, prompt for a default output file for the
autoload definitions, and temporarily bind the variable
`generated-autoload-file' to this value.  When called from Lisp,
use the existing value of `generated-autoload-file'.  If any Lisp
file binds `generated-autoload-file' as a file-local variable,
write its autoloads into the specified file instead.

\(fn &rest DIRS)" t nil)

(autoload 'batch-update-autoloads "autoload" "\
Update loaddefs.el autoloads in batch mode.
Calls `update-directory-autoloads' on the command line arguments.
Definitions are written to `generated-autoload-file' (which
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should be non-nil)." nil nil)
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(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "autoload" '("autoload-" "generate" "make-autoload" "no-update-autoloads")))
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;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "autorevert" "autorevert.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from autorevert.el

(autoload 'auto-revert-mode "autorevert" "\
Toggle reverting buffer when the file changes (Auto-Revert Mode).
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If called interactively, enable Auto-Revert mode if ARG is positive,
and disable it if ARG is zero or negative.  If called from Lisp, also
enable the mode if ARG is omitted or nil, and toggle it if ARG is
`toggle'; disable the mode otherwise.
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Auto-Revert Mode is a minor mode that affects only the current
buffer.  When enabled, it reverts the buffer when the file on
disk changes.

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When a buffer is reverted, a message is generated.  This can be
suppressed by setting `auto-revert-verbose' to nil.

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Use `global-auto-revert-mode' to automatically revert all buffers.
Use `auto-revert-tail-mode' if you know that the file will only grow
without being changed in the part that is already in the buffer.

\(fn &optional ARG)" t nil)

(autoload 'turn-on-auto-revert-mode "autorevert" "\
Turn on Auto-Revert Mode.

This function is designed to be added to hooks, for example:
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  (add-hook \\='c-mode-hook #\\='turn-on-auto-revert-mode)" nil nil)
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(autoload 'auto-revert-tail-mode "autorevert" "\
Toggle reverting tail of buffer when the file grows.
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If called interactively, enable Auto-Revert-Tail mode if ARG is
positive, and disable it if ARG is zero or negative.  If called from
Lisp, also enable the mode if ARG is omitted or nil, and toggle it if
ARG is `toggle'; disable the mode otherwise.
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When Auto-Revert Tail Mode is enabled, the tail of the file is
constantly followed, as with the shell command `tail -f'.  This
means that whenever the file grows on disk (presumably because
some background process is appending to it from time to time),
this is reflected in the current buffer.

You can edit the buffer and turn this mode off and on again as
you please.  But make sure the background process has stopped
writing before you save the file!

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When a buffer is reverted, a message is generated.  This can be
suppressed by setting `auto-revert-verbose' to nil.

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Use `auto-revert-mode' for changes other than appends!

\(fn &optional ARG)" t nil)

(autoload 'turn-on-auto-revert-tail-mode "autorevert" "\
Turn on Auto-Revert Tail Mode.

This function is designed to be added to hooks, for example:
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  (add-hook \\='my-logfile-mode-hook #\\='turn-on-auto-revert-tail-mode)" nil nil)
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(defvar global-auto-revert-mode nil "\
Non-nil if Global Auto-Revert mode is enabled.
See the `global-auto-revert-mode' command
for a description of this minor mode.
Setting this variable directly does not take effect;
either customize it (see the info node `Easy Customization')
or call the function `global-auto-revert-mode'.")

(custom-autoload 'global-auto-revert-mode "autorevert" nil)

(autoload 'global-auto-revert-mode "autorevert" "\
Toggle Global Auto-Revert Mode.
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If called interactively, enable Global Auto-Revert mode if ARG is
positive, and disable it if ARG is zero or negative.  If called from
Lisp, also enable the mode if ARG is omitted or nil, and toggle it if
ARG is `toggle'; disable the mode otherwise.
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Global Auto-Revert Mode is a global minor mode that reverts any
buffer associated with a file when the file changes on disk.  Use
`auto-revert-mode' to revert a particular buffer.

If `global-auto-revert-non-file-buffers' is non-nil, this mode
may also revert some non-file buffers, as described in the
documentation of that variable.  It ignores buffers with modes
matching `global-auto-revert-ignore-modes', and buffers with a
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non-nil value of `global-auto-revert-ignore-buffer'.
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When a buffer is reverted, a message is generated.  This can be
suppressed by setting `auto-revert-verbose' to nil.

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This function calls the hook `global-auto-revert-mode-hook'.
It displays the text that `global-auto-revert-mode-text'
specifies in the mode line.

\(fn &optional ARG)" t nil)

(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "autorevert" '("auto-revert-" "global-auto-revert-")))

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "avl-tree" "emacs-lisp/avl-tree.el" (0 0 0
;;;;;;  0))
;;; Generated autoloads from emacs-lisp/avl-tree.el

(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "avl-tree" '("avl-tree-")))

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "avoid" "avoid.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from avoid.el

(defvar mouse-avoidance-mode nil "\
Activate Mouse Avoidance mode.
See function `mouse-avoidance-mode' for possible values.
Setting this variable directly does not take effect;
use either \\[customize] or the function `mouse-avoidance-mode'.")

(custom-autoload 'mouse-avoidance-mode "avoid" nil)

(autoload 'mouse-avoidance-mode "avoid" "\
Set Mouse Avoidance mode to MODE.
MODE should be one of the symbols `banish', `exile', `jump', `animate',
`cat-and-mouse', `proteus', or `none'.

If MODE is nil, toggle mouse avoidance between `none' and `banish'
modes.  Positive numbers and symbols other than the above are treated
as equivalent to `banish'; negative numbers and `-' are equivalent to `none'.

Effects of the different modes:
 * banish: Move the mouse to the upper-right corner on any keypress.
 * exile: Move the mouse to the corner only if the cursor gets too close,
     and allow it to return once the cursor is out of the way.
 * jump: If the cursor gets too close to the mouse, displace the mouse
     a random distance & direction.
 * animate: As `jump', but shows steps along the way for illusion of motion.
 * cat-and-mouse: Same as `animate'.
 * proteus: As `animate', but changes the shape of the mouse pointer too.

\(See `mouse-avoidance-threshold' for definition of \"too close\",
and `mouse-avoidance-nudge-dist' and `mouse-avoidance-nudge-var' for
definition of \"random distance\".)

\(fn &optional MODE)" t nil)

(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "avoid" '("mouse-avoidance-")))

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;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "backtrace" "emacs-lisp/backtrace.el" (0 0
;;;;;;  0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from emacs-lisp/backtrace.el
(push (purecopy '(backtrace 1 0)) package--builtin-versions)

(autoload 'backtrace "backtrace" "\
Print a trace of Lisp function calls currently active.
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Output stream used is value of `standard-output'." nil nil)
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(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "backtrace" '("backtrace-")))

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;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "bat-mode" "progmodes/bat-mode.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from progmodes/bat-mode.el

(add-to-list 'auto-mode-alist '("\\.\\(bat\\|cmd\\)\\'" . bat-mode))

(autoload 'bat-mode "bat-mode" "\
Major mode for editing DOS/Windows batch files.

Start a new script from `bat-template'.  Read help pages for DOS commands
with `bat-cmd-help'.  Navigate between sections using `imenu'.
Run script using `bat-run' and `bat-run-args'.

\\{bat-mode-map}

\(fn)" t nil)

(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "bat-mode" '("bat-")))

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "battery" "battery.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from battery.el
 (put 'battery-mode-line-string 'risky-local-variable t)

(autoload 'battery "battery" "\
Display battery status information in the echo area.
The text being displayed in the echo area is controlled by the variables
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`battery-echo-area-format' and `battery-status-function'." t nil)
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(defvar display-battery-mode nil "\
Non-nil if Display-Battery mode is enabled.
See the `display-battery-mode' command
for a description of this minor mode.
Setting this variable directly does not take effect;
either customize it (see the info node `Easy Customization')
or call the function `display-battery-mode'.")

(custom-autoload 'display-battery-mode "battery" nil)

(autoload 'display-battery-mode "battery" "\
Toggle battery status display in mode line (Display Battery mode).
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If called interactively, enable Display-Battery mode if ARG is
positive, and disable it if ARG is zero or negative.  If called from
Lisp, also enable the mode if ARG is omitted or nil, and toggle it if
ARG is `toggle'; disable the mode otherwise.
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The text displayed in the mode line is controlled by
`battery-mode-line-format' and `battery-status-function'.
The mode line is be updated every `battery-update-interval'
seconds.

\(fn &optional ARG)" t nil)

(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "battery" '("battery-")))

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "benchmark" "emacs-lisp/benchmark.el" (0 0
;;;;;;  0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from emacs-lisp/benchmark.el

(autoload 'benchmark-run "benchmark" "\
Time execution of FORMS.
If REPETITIONS is supplied as a number, run forms that many times,
accounting for the overhead of the resulting loop.  Otherwise run
FORMS once.
Return a list of the total elapsed time for execution, the number of
garbage collections that ran, and the time taken by garbage collection.
See also `benchmark-run-compiled'.

\(fn &optional REPETITIONS &rest FORMS)" nil t)

(function-put 'benchmark-run 'lisp-indent-function '1)

(autoload 'benchmark-run-compiled "benchmark" "\
Time execution of compiled version of FORMS.
This is like `benchmark-run', but what is timed is a funcall of the
byte code obtained by wrapping FORMS in a `lambda' and compiling the
result.  The overhead of the `lambda's is accounted for.

\(fn &optional REPETITIONS &rest FORMS)" nil t)

(function-put 'benchmark-run-compiled 'lisp-indent-function '1)

(autoload 'benchmark "benchmark" "\
Print the time taken for REPETITIONS executions of FORM.
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Interactively, REPETITIONS is taken from the prefix arg, and
the command prompts for the form to benchmark.
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For non-interactive use see also `benchmark-run' and
`benchmark-run-compiled'.

\(fn REPETITIONS FORM)" t nil)

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(autoload 'benchmark-progn "benchmark" "\
Evaluate BODY and message the time taken.
The return value is the value of the final form in BODY.

\(fn &rest BODY)" nil t)

(function-put 'benchmark-progn 'lisp-indent-function '0)

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(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "benchmark" '("benchmark-elapse")))

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "bib-mode" "textmodes/bib-mode.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from textmodes/bib-mode.el

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(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "bib-mode" '("addbib" "bib-" "mark-bib" "return-key-bib" "unread-bib")))
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;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "bibtex" "textmodes/bibtex.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from textmodes/bibtex.el

(autoload 'bibtex-initialize "bibtex" "\
(Re)Initialize BibTeX buffers.
Visit the BibTeX files defined by `bibtex-files' and return a list
of corresponding buffers.
Initialize in these buffers `bibtex-reference-keys' if not yet set.
List of BibTeX buffers includes current buffer if CURRENT is non-nil
and the current buffer visits a file using `bibtex-mode'.
If FORCE is non-nil, (re)initialize `bibtex-reference-keys' even if
already set.  If SELECT is non-nil interactively select a BibTeX buffer.

When called interactively, FORCE is t, CURRENT is t if current buffer
visits a file using `bibtex-mode', and SELECT is t if current buffer
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does not use `bibtex-mode'.
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\(fn &optional CURRENT FORCE SELECT)" t nil)

(autoload 'bibtex-mode "bibtex" "\
Major mode for editing BibTeX files.

General information on working with BibTeX mode:

Use commands such as \\<bibtex-mode-map>\\[bibtex-Book] to get a template for a specific entry.
Then fill in all desired fields using \\[bibtex-next-field] to jump from field
to field.  After having filled in all desired fields in the entry, clean the
new entry with the command \\[bibtex-clean-entry].

Some features of BibTeX mode are available only by setting the variable
`bibtex-maintain-sorted-entries' to non-nil.  However, then BibTeX mode
works only with buffers containing valid (syntactically correct) and sorted
entries.  This is usually the case, if you have created a buffer completely
with BibTeX mode and finished every new entry with \\[bibtex-clean-entry].

For third party BibTeX files, call the command \\[bibtex-convert-alien]
to fully take advantage of all features of BibTeX mode.


Special information:

A command such as \\[bibtex-Book] outlines the fields for a BibTeX book entry.

The names of optional fields start with the string OPT, and are thus ignored
by BibTeX.  The names of alternative fields from which only one is required
start with the string ALT.  The OPT or ALT string may be removed from
the name of a field with \\[bibtex-remove-OPT-or-ALT].
\\[bibtex-make-field] inserts a new field after the current one.
\\[bibtex-kill-field] kills the current field entirely.
\\[bibtex-yank] yanks the last recently killed field after the current field.
\\[bibtex-remove-delimiters] removes the double-quotes or braces around the text of the current field.
\\[bibtex-empty-field] replaces the text of the current field with the default \"\" or {}.
\\[bibtex-find-text] moves point to the end of the current field.
\\[completion-at-point] completes word fragment before point according to context.

The command \\[bibtex-clean-entry] cleans the current entry, i.e. it removes OPT/ALT
from the names of all non-empty optional or alternative fields, checks that
no required fields are empty, and does some formatting dependent on the value
of `bibtex-entry-format'.  Furthermore, it can automatically generate a key
for the BibTeX entry, see `bibtex-generate-autokey'.
Note: some functions in BibTeX mode depend on entries being in a special
format (all fields beginning on separate lines), so it is usually a bad
idea to remove `realign' from `bibtex-entry-format'.

BibTeX mode supports Imenu and hideshow minor mode (`hs-minor-mode').

----------------------------------------------------------
Entry to BibTeX mode calls the value of `bibtex-mode-hook'
if that value is non-nil.

\\{bibtex-mode-map}

\(fn)" t nil)

(autoload 'bibtex-search-entry "bibtex" "\
Move point to the beginning of BibTeX entry named KEY.
Return position of entry if KEY is found or nil if not found.
With GLOBAL non-nil, search KEY in `bibtex-files'.  Otherwise the search
is limited to the current buffer.  Optional arg START is buffer position
where the search starts.  If it is nil, start search at beginning of buffer.
If DISPLAY is non-nil, display the buffer containing KEY.
Otherwise, use `set-buffer'.
When called interactively, START is nil, DISPLAY is t.
Also, GLOBAL is t if the current mode is not `bibtex-mode'
or `bibtex-search-entry-globally' is non-nil.
A prefix arg negates the value of `bibtex-search-entry-globally'.

\(fn KEY &optional GLOBAL START DISPLAY)" t nil)

(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "bibtex" '("bibtex-")))

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "bibtex-style" "textmodes/bibtex-style.el"
;;;;;;  (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from textmodes/bibtex-style.el

(autoload 'bibtex-style-mode "bibtex-style" "\
Major mode for editing BibTeX style files.

\(fn)" t nil)

(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "bibtex-style" '("bibtex-style-")))

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "bindat" "emacs-lisp/bindat.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from emacs-lisp/bindat.el

(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "bindat" '("bindat-")))

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "binhex" "mail/binhex.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from mail/binhex.el

(defconst binhex-begin-line "^:...............................................................$" "\
Regular expression matching the start of a BinHex encoded region.")

(autoload 'binhex-decode-region-internal "binhex" "\
Binhex decode region between START and END without using an external program.
If HEADER-ONLY is non-nil only decode header and return filename.

\(fn START END &optional HEADER-ONLY)" t nil)

(autoload 'binhex-decode-region-external "binhex" "\
Binhex decode region between START and END using external decoder.

\(fn START END)" t nil)

(autoload 'binhex-decode-region "binhex" "\
Binhex decode region between START and END.

\(fn START END)" t nil)

(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "binhex" '("binhex-")))

;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "blackbox" "play/blackbox.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from play/blackbox.el

(autoload 'blackbox "blackbox" "\
Play blackbox.
Optional prefix argument is the number of balls; the default is 4.

What is blackbox?

Blackbox is a game of hide and seek played on an 8 by 8 grid (the
Blackbox).  Your opponent (Emacs, in this case) has hidden several
balls (usually 4) within this box.  By shooting rays into the box and
observing where they emerge it is possible to deduce the positions of
the hidden balls.  The fewer rays you use to find the balls, the lower
your score.

Overview of play:

\\<blackbox-mode-map>To play blackbox, type \\[blackbox].  An optional prefix argument
specifies the number of balls to be hidden in the box; the default is
four.

The cursor can be moved around the box with the standard cursor
movement keys.

To shoot a ray, move the cursor to the edge of the box and press SPC.
The result will be determined and the playfield updated.

You may place or remove balls in the box by moving the cursor into the
box and pressing \\[bb-romp].

When you think the configuration of balls you have placed is correct,
press \\[bb-done].  You will be informed whether you are correct or
not, and be given your score.  Your score is the number of letters and
numbers around the outside of the box plus five for each incorrectly
placed ball.  If you placed any balls incorrectly, they will be
indicated with `x', and their actual positions indicated with `o'.

Details:

There are three possible outcomes for each ray you send into the box:

	Detour: the ray is deflected and emerges somewhere other than
		where you sent it in.  On the playfield, detours are
		denoted by matching pairs of numbers -- one where the
		ray went in, and the other where it came out.

	Reflection: the ray is reflected and emerges in the same place
		it was sent in.  On the playfield, reflections are
		denoted by the letter `R'.

	Hit:	the ray strikes a ball directly and is absorbed.  It does
		not emerge from the box.  On the playfield, hits are
		denoted by the letter `H'.

The rules for how balls deflect rays are simple and are best shown by
example.

As a ray approaches a ball it is deflected ninety degrees.  Rays can
be deflected multiple times.  In the diagrams below, the dashes
represent empty box locations and the letter `O' represents a ball.
The entrance and exit points of each ray are marked with numbers as
described under \"Detour\" above.  Note that the entrance and exit
points are always interchangeable.  `*' denotes the path taken by the
ray.

Note carefully the relative positions of the ball and the ninety
degree deflection it causes.

    1
  - * - - - - - -         - - - - - - - -         - - - - - - - -
  - * - - - - - -         - - - - - - - -         - - - - - - - -
1 * * - - - - - -         - - - - - - - -         - O - - - - O -
  - - O - - - - -         - - O - - - - -         - - * * * * - -
  - - - - - - - -         - - - * * * * * 2     3 * * * - - * - -
  - - - - - - - -         - - - * - - - -         - - - O - * - -
  - - - - - - - -         - - - * - - - -         - - - - * * - -
  - - - - - - - -         - - - * - - - -         - - - - * - O -
                                2                         3

As mentioned above, a reflection occurs when a ray emerges from the same point
it was sent in.  This can happen in several ways:


  - - - - - - - -         - - - - - - - -          - - - - - - - -
  - - - - O - - -         - - O - O - - -          - - - - - - - -
R * * * * - - - -         - - - * - - - -          O - - - - - - -
  - - - - O - - -         - - - * - - - -        R - - - - - - - -
  - - - - - - - -         - - - * - - - -          - - - - - - - -
  - - - - - - - -         - - - * - - - -          - - - - - - - -
  - - - - - - - -       R * * * * - - - -          - - - - - - - -
  - - - - - - - -         - - - - O - - -          - - - - - - - -

In the first example, the ray is deflected downwards by the upper
ball, then left by the lower ball, and finally retraces its path to
its point of origin.  The second example is similar.  The third
example is a bit anomalous but can be rationalized by realizing the
ray never gets a chance to get into the box.  Alternatively, the ray
can be thought of as being deflected downwards and immediately
emerging from the box.

A hit occurs when a ray runs straight into a ball:

  - - - - - - - -         - - - - - - - -          - - - - - - - -
  - - - - - - - -         - - - - - - - -          - - - - O - - -
  - - - - - - - -         - - - - O - - -        H * * * * - - - -
  - - - - - - - -       H * * * * O - - -          - - - * - - - -
  - - - - - - - -         - - - - O - - -          - - - O - - - -
H * * * O - - - -         - - - - - - - -          - - - - - - - -
  - - - - - - - -         - - - - - - - -          - - - - - - - -
  - - - - - - - -         - - - - - - - -          - - - - - - - -

Be sure to compare the second example of a hit with the first example of
a reflection.

\(fn NUM)" t nil)

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(if (fboundp 'register-definition-prefixes) (register-definition-prefixes "blackbox" '("bb-" "blackbox-")))
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;;;***

;;;### (autoloads nil "bookmark" "bookmark.el" (0 0 0 0))
;;; Generated autoloads from bookmark.el
 (define-key ctl-x-r-map "b" 'bookmark-jump)
 (define-key ctl-x-r-map "m" 'bookmark-set)
 (define-key ctl-x-r-map "M" 'bookmark-set-no-overwrite)
 (define-key ctl-x-r-map "l" 'bookmark-bmenu-list)

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(defvar bookmark-map (let ((map (make-sparse-keymap))) (define-key map "x" 'bookmark-set) (define-key map "m" 'bookmark-set) (define-key map "M" 'bookmark-set-no-overwrite) (define-key map "j" 'bookmark-jump) (define-key map "g" 'bookmark-jump) (define-key map "o" 'bookmark-jump-other-window) (define-key map "5" 'bookmark-jump-other-frame) (define-key map "i" 'bookmark-insert) (define-key map "e" 'edit-bookmarks) (define-key map "f" 'bookmark-insert-location) (define-key map "r" 'bookmark-rename) (define-key map "d" 'bookmark-delete) (define-key map "l" 'bookmark-load) (define-key map "w" 'bookmark-write) (define-key map "s" 'bookmark-save) map) "\
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Keymap containing bindings to bookmark functions.
It is not bound to any key by default: to bind it
so that you have a bookmark prefix, just use `global-set-key' and bind a
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key of your choice to variable `bookmark-map'.  All interactive bookmark
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functions have a binding in this keymap.")
 (fset 'bookmark-map bookmark-map)

(autoload 'bookmark-set "bookmark" "\
Set a bookmark named NAME at the current location.
If NAME is nil, then prompt the user.

With a prefix arg (non-nil NO-OVERWRITE), do not overwrite any
existing bookmark that has the same name as NAME, but instead push the
new bookmark onto the bookmark alist.  The most recently set bookmark
with name NAME is thus the one in effect at any given time, but the
others are still there, should the user decide to delete the most
recent one.

To yank words from the text of the buffer and use them as part of the
bookmark name, type C-w while setting a bookmark.  Successive C-w's
yank successive words.

Typing C-u inserts (at the bookmark name prompt) the name of the last
bookmark used in the document where the new bookmark is being set;
this helps you use a single bookmark name to track progress through a
large document.  If there is no prior bookmark for this document, then
C-u inserts an appropriate name based on the buffer or file.

Use \\[bookmark-delete] to remove bookmarks (you give it a name and
it removes only the first instance of a bookmark with that name from
the list of bookmarks.)

\(fn &optional NAME NO-OVERWRITE)" t nil)

(autoload 'bookmark-set-no-overwrite "bookmark" "\
Set a bookmark named NAME at the current location.
If NAME is nil, then prompt the user.

If a bookmark named NAME already exists and prefix argument
PUSH-BOOKMARK is non-nil, then push the new bookmark onto the
bookmark alist.  Pushing it means that among bookmarks named
NAME, this one becomes the one in effect, but the others are
still there, in order, and become effective again if the user
ever deletes the most recent one.

Otherwise, if a bookmark named NAME already exists but PUSH-BOOKMARK
is nil, raise an error.

To yank words from the text of the buffer and use them as part of the
bookmark name, type C-w while setting a bookmark.  Successive C-w's
yank successive words.

Typing C-u inserts (at the bookmark name prompt) the name of the last
bookmark used in the document where the new bookmark is being set;
this helps you use a single bookmark name to track progress through a
large document.  If there is no prior bookmark for this document, then
C-u inserts an appropriate name based on the buffer or file.

Use \\[bookmark-delete] to remove bookmarks (you give it a name and
it removes only the first instance of a bookmark with that name from
the list of bookmarks.)

\(fn &optional NAME PUSH-BOOKMARK)" t nil)

(autoload 'bookmark-jump "bookmark" "\
Jump to bookmark BOOKMARK (a point in some file).
You may have a problem using this function if the value of variable
`bookmark-alist' is nil.  If that happens, you need to load in some
bookmarks.  See help on function `bookmark-load' for more about
this.

If the file pointed to by BOOKMARK no longer exists, you will be asked
if you wish to give the bookmark a new location, and `bookmark-jump'
will then jump to the new location, as well as recording it in place
of the old one in the permanent bookmark record.

BOOKMARK is usually a bookmark name (a string).  It can also be a
bookmark record, but this is usually only done by programmatic callers.

If DISPLAY-FUNC is non-nil, it is a function to invoke to display the
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bookmark.  It defaults to `pop-to-buffer-same-window'.  A typical value for
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DISPLAY-FUNC would be `switch-to-buffer-other-window'.

\(fn BOOKMARK &optional DISPLAY-FUNC)" t nil)

(autoload 'bookmark-jump-other-window "bookmark" "\
Jump to BOOKMARK in another window.  See `bookmark-jump' for more.

\(fn BOOKMARK)" t nil)

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(autoload 'bookmark-jump-other-frame "bookmark" "\
Jump to BOOKMARK in another frame.  See `bookmark-jump' for more.

\(fn BOOKMARK)" t nil)

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(autoload 'bookmark-relocate "bookmark" "\
Relocate BOOKMARK-NAME to another file, reading file name with minibuffer.

This makes an already existing bookmark point to that file, instead of
the one it used to point at.  Useful when a file has been renamed
after a bookmark was set in it.

\(fn BOOKMARK-NAME)" t nil)

(autoload 'bookmark-insert-location "bookmark" "\
Insert the name of the file associated with BOOKMARK-NAME.

Optional second arg NO-HISTORY means don't record this in the
minibuffer history list `bookmark-history'.

\(fn BOOKMARK-NAME &optional NO-HISTORY)" t nil)

(defalias 'bookmark-locate 'bookmark-insert-location)

(autoload 'bookmark-rename "bookmark" "\
Change the name of OLD-NAME bookmark to NEW-NAME name.
If called from keyboard, prompt for OLD-NAME and NEW-NAME.
If called from menubar, select OLD-NAME from a menu and prompt for NEW-NAME.

If called from Lisp, prompt for NEW-NAME if only OLD-NAME was passed
as an argument.  If called with two strings, then no prompting is done.
You must pass at least OLD-NAME when calling from Lisp.

While you are entering the new name, consecutive C-w's insert
consecutive words from the text of the buffer into the new bookmark
name.

\(fn OLD-NAME &optional NEW-NAME)" t nil)

(autoload 'bookmark-insert "bookmark" "\
Insert the text of the file pointed to by bookmark BOOKMARK-NAME.
BOOKMARK-NAME is a bookmark name (a string), not a bookmark record.

You may have a problem using this function if the value of variable
`bookmark-alist' is nil.  If that happens, you need to load in some
bookmarks.  See help on function `bookmark-load' for more about
this.

\(fn BOOKMARK-NAME)" t nil)

(autoload 'bookmark-delete "bookmark" "\
Delete BOOKMARK-NAME from the bookmark list.

Removes only the first instance of a bookmark with that name.  If
there are one or more other bookmarks with the same name, they will
not be deleted.  Defaults to the \"current\" bookmark (that is, the
one most recently used in this file, if any).
Optional second arg BATCH means don't update the bookmark list buffer,
probably because we were called from there.

\(fn BOOKMARK-NAME &optional BATCH)" t nil)

(autoload 'bookmark-write "bookmark" "\
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Write bookmarks to a file (reading the file name with the minibuffer)." t nil)
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(function-put 'bookmark-write 'interactive-only 'bookmark-save)

(autoload 'bookmark-save "bookmark" "\
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Save currently defined bookmarks in FILE.
FILE defaults to `bookmark-default-file'.
With prefix PARG, query user for a file to save in.
If MAKE-DEFAULT is non-nil (interactively with prefix C-u C-u)
the file we save in becomes the new default in the current Emacs
session (without affecting the value of `bookmark-default-file'.).
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When you want to load in the bookmarks from a file, use
`bookmark-load', \\[bookmark-load].  That function will prompt you
for a file, defaulting to the file defined by variable
`bookmark-default-file'.

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\(fn &optional PARG FILE MAKE-DEFAULT)" t nil)
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(autoload 'bookmark-load "bookmark" "\
Load bookmarks from FILE (which must be in bookmark format).
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Appends loaded bookmarks to the front of the list of bookmarks.
If argument OVERWRITE is non-nil, existing bookmarks are destroyed.
Optional third arg NO-MSG means don't display any messages while loading.
If DEFAULT is non-nil make FILE the new bookmark file to watch.
Interactively, a prefix arg makes OVERWRITE and DEFAULT non-nil.
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If you load a file that doesn't contain a proper bookmark alist, you
will corrupt Emacs's bookmark list.  Generally, you should only load
in files that were created with the bookmark functions in the first
place.  Your own personal bookmark file, specified by the variable
`bookmark-default-file', is maintained automatically by Emacs; you
shouldn't need to load it explicitly.

If you load a file containing bookmarks with the same names as
bookmarks already present in your Emacs, the new bookmarks will get
unique numeric suffixes \"<2>\", \"<3>\", etc.

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\(fn FILE &optional OVERWRITE NO-MSG DEFAULT)" t nil)
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(autoload 'bookmark-bmenu-list "bookmark" "\
Display a list of existing bookmarks.
The list is displayed in a buffer named `*Bookmark List*'.
The leftmost column displays a D if the bookmark is flagged for
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deletion, or > if it is flagged for displaying." t nil)
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(defalias 'list-bookmarks 'bookmark-bmenu-list)

(defalias 'edit-bookmarks 'bookmark-bmenu-list)

(autoload 'bookmark-bmenu-search "bookmark" "\
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Incremental search of bookmarks, hiding the non-matches as we go." t nil)
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(defvar menu-bar-bookmark-map (let ((map (make-sparse-keymap "Bookmark functions"))) (bindings--define-key map [load] '(menu-item "Load a Bookmark File..." bookmark-load :help "Load bookmarks from a bookmark file)")) (bindings--define-key map [write] '(menu-item "Save Bookmarks As..." bookmark