Commit 03196404 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

(Screen): Explain better about cursors and mode lines;

don't presuppose text terminals.
(Point): Don't assume just one cursor.
Clarify explanation of cursors.
(Echo Area, Menu Bar): Cleanups.
parent c0a5ac4a
2005-02-25 Richard M. Stallman <rms@gnu.org>
* screen.texi (Screen): Explain better about cursors and mode lines;
don't presuppose text terminals.
(Point): Don't assume just one cursor.
Clarify explanation of cursors.
(Echo Area, Menu Bar): Cleanups.
* mini.texi (Minibuffer): Prompts are highlighted.
(Minibuffer Edit): Newline = C-j only on text terminals.
Clarify resize-mini-windows values.
Mention M-PAGEUP and M-PAGEDOWN.
(Completion Commands): Mouse-1 like Mouse-2.
(Minibuffer History): Explain history commands better.
(Repetition): Add xref to Incremental Search.
* mark.texi (Setting Mark): Clarify info about displaying mark.
Clarify explanation of C-@ and C-SPC.
(Transient Mark): Mention Delete Selection mode.
(Marking Objects): Clean up text about extending the region.
* m-x.texi (M-x): One C-g doesn't always go to top level.
No delay before suggest-key-bindings output.
* fixit.texi (Fixit): Mention C-/ for undo.
(Spelling): Mention ESC TAB like M-TAB.
Replacement words with r and R are rechecked.
Say where C-g leaves point. Mention ? as input.
2005-02-23 Lute Kamstra <lute@gnu.org>
* cmdargs.texi (Initial Options): Add cross reference.
......
......@@ -29,19 +29,23 @@ into multiple text windows, each of which can be used for a different
file (@pxref{Windows}). In this manual, the word ``window'' always
refers to the subdivisions of a frame within Emacs.
At any time, one window is the @dfn{selected window}; the most
prominent cursor indicates which window is selected. Most Emacs
commands implicitly apply to the text in the selected window (though
mouse commands generally operate on whatever window you click them in,
whether selected or not). The other windows display text for
reference only, unless/until you select them. If you use multiple
frames under the X Window System, then giving the input focus to a
particular frame selects a window in that frame.
At any time, one window is the @dfn{selected window}. On graphical
terminals, the selected window normally shows a more prominent cursor
(solid and blinking) while other windows show a weaker cursor (such as
a hollow box). On text terminals, which have just one cursor, that cursor
appears in the selected window.
Most Emacs commands implicitly apply to the text in the selected
window (though mouse commands generally operate on whatever window you
click them in, whether selected or not). The other windows display
text for reference only, unless/until you select them. If you use
multiple frames under the X Window System, then giving the input focus
to a particular frame selects a window in that frame.
Each window's last line is a @dfn{mode line}, which describes what
is going on in that window. It appears in inverse video, if the
terminal supports that; its contents normally begin with
@w{@samp{--:-- @ *scratch*}} when Emacs starts. The mode line
is going on in that window. It appears in different color and/or a
``3D'' box, if the terminal supports that; its contents normally begin
with @w{@samp{--:-- @ *scratch*}} when Emacs starts. The mode line
displays status information such as what buffer is being displayed
above it in the window, what major and minor modes are in use, and
whether the buffer contains unsaved changes.
......@@ -58,7 +62,7 @@ whether the buffer contains unsaved changes.
@cindex point
@cindex cursor
Within Emacs, the terminal's cursor shows the location at which
Within Emacs, the active cursor shows the location at which
editing commands will take effect. This location is called @dfn{point}.
Many Emacs commands move point through the text, so that you can edit at
different places in it. You can also place point by clicking mouse
......@@ -93,9 +97,9 @@ though. Once display updating finishes, Emacs puts the cursor where
point is.
On graphical terminals, Emacs shows a cursor in each window; the
selected window's cursor is solid or blinking, and the other cursors
are just hollow. Thus, the most striking cursor always shows you
the selected window, on all kinds of terminals.
selected window's cursor is solid and blinking, and the other cursors
are just hollow. Thus, the most prominent cursor always shows you the
selected window, on all kinds of terminals.
@xref{Cursor Display}, for customizable variables that control display
of the cursor or cursors.
......@@ -111,11 +115,11 @@ for accessing the value now called ``point.''
The line at the bottom of the frame (below the mode line) is the
@dfn{echo area}. It is used to display small amounts of text for
several purposes.
various purposes.
@dfn{Echoing} means displaying the characters that you type. Outside
Emacs, the operating system normally echoes all your input. Emacs
handles echoing differently.
@dfn{Echoing} means displaying the characters that you type. At the
command line, the operating system normally echoes all your input.
Emacs handles echoing differently.
Single-character commands do not echo in Emacs, and multi-character
commands echo only if you pause while typing them. As soon as you pause
......@@ -326,7 +330,7 @@ them here, as you can more easily see for yourself.
When you are using a window system, you can use the mouse to choose a
command from the menu bar. An arrow pointing right, after the menu
item, indicates that the item leads to a subsidiary menu; @samp{...} at
the end means that the command will read arguments from the keyboard
the end means that the command will read arguments (further input from you)
before it actually does anything.
To view the full command name and documentation for a menu item, type
......
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