Commit 04242bdc authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris
Browse files

(Rmail Basics): Add reference to sorting.

(Rmail Scrolling, Rmail Motion, Rmail Reply, Rmail Display):
Minor re-wordings.
(Rmail Deletion): Expunging is not the only way to change the numbers.
(Rmail Labels): Labels can also be used in sorting.
(Rmail Summary Edit): Mention rmail-summary-next-same-subject.
parent 749c6447
2009-03-05 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* rmail.texi (Rmail Motion): Mention rmail-next-same-subject.
* rmail.texi (Rmail Basics): Add reference to sorting.
(Rmail Scrolling, Rmail Motion, Rmail Reply, Rmail Display):
Minor re-wordings.
(Rmail Motion): Mention rmail-next-same-subject.
(Rmail Deletion): Expunging is not the only way to change the numbers.
(Rmail Labels): Labels can also be used in sorting.
(Rmail Summary Edit): Mention rmail-summary-next-same-subject.
(Rmail Display): Mention rmail-mime.
2009-03-04 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
......
......@@ -59,12 +59,12 @@ messages between them.
@cindex message number
Within the Rmail file, messages are normally arranged sequentially in
order of receipt; you can specify other ways to sort them. Messages are
identified by consecutive integers which are their @dfn{message numbers}.
The number of the current message is displayed in Rmail's mode line,
followed by the total number of messages in the file. You can move to
a message by specifying its message number with the @kbd{j} key
(@pxref{Rmail Motion}).
order of receipt; you can specify other ways to sort them (@pxref{Rmail
Sorting}). Messages are identified by consecutive integers which are
their @dfn{message numbers}. The number of the current message is
displayed in Rmail's mode line, followed by the total number of messages
in the file. You can move to a message by specifying its message number
with the @kbd{j} key (@pxref{Rmail Motion}).
@kindex s @r{(Rmail)}
@findex rmail-expunge-and-save
......@@ -122,7 +122,7 @@ through it by screenfuls, Rmail makes @key{SPC} and @key{DEL} synonyms of
The command @kbd{.} (@code{rmail-beginning-of-message}) scrolls back to the
beginning of the selected message. This is not quite the same as @kbd{M-<}:
for one thing, it does not set the mark; for another, it resets the buffer
boundaries to the current message if you have changed them. Similarly,
boundaries of the current message if you have changed them. Similarly,
the command @kbd{/} (@code{rmail-end-of-message}) scrolls forward to the end
of the selected message.
@c The comment about buffer boundaries is still true in mbox Rmail, if
......@@ -225,7 +225,7 @@ the next message with the same subject as the current one. A prefix
argument serves as a repeat count. With a negative argument, this
command moves backward, acting like @kbd{C-c C-p}
(@code{rmail-previous-same-subject}). When comparing subjects, these
commands ignore the typical prefixes added to the subjects of replies.
commands ignore the prefixes typically added to the subjects of replies.
@kindex j @r{(Rmail)}
@kindex > @r{(Rmail)}
......@@ -250,9 +250,11 @@ message number.
@cindex expunging (Rmail)
@dfn{Expunging} the Rmail file actually removes the deleted messages.
The remaining messages are renumbered consecutively. Expunging is the only
action that changes the message number of any message, except for
undigestifying (@pxref{Rmail Digest}).
The remaining messages are renumbered consecutively.
@c The following is neither true (there is also unforward, sorting,
@c etc), nor especially interesting.
@c Expunging is the only action that changes the message number of any
@c message, except for undigestifying (@pxref{Rmail Digest}).
@table @kbd
@item d
......@@ -612,7 +614,7 @@ means to assign or remove the same label most recently assigned or
removed.
Once you have given messages labels to classify them as you wish, there
are two ways to use the labels: in moving and in summaries.
are three ways to use the labels: in moving, in summaries, and in sorting.
@kindex C-M-n @r{(Rmail)}
@kindex C-M-p @r{(Rmail)}
......@@ -636,6 +638,8 @@ argument @var{labels} is one or more label names, separated by commas.
@kbd{C-M-l} is empty, it means to use the last set of labels specified
for any of these commands.
@xref{Rmail Sorting}, for information on sorting messages with labels.
@node Rmail Attributes
@section Rmail Attributes
......@@ -781,7 +785,7 @@ current one.
@dfn{Resending} is an alternative similar to forwarding; the
difference is that resending sends a message that is ``from'' the
original sender, just as it reached you---with a few added header fields
@samp{Resent-From} and @samp{Resent-To} to indicate that it came via
(@samp{Resent-From} and @samp{Resent-To}) to indicate that it came via
you. To resend a message in Rmail, use @kbd{C-u f}. (@kbd{f} runs
@code{rmail-forward}, which invokes @code{rmail-resend} if you provide a
numeric argument.)
......@@ -997,6 +1001,13 @@ count.
@item C-M-p @var{labels} @key{RET}
Move to the previous message with at least one of the specified labels
(@code{rmail-summary-previous-labeled-message}).
@item C-c C-n @key{RET}
Move to the next message with the same subject as the current message
(@code{rmail-summary-next-same-subject}). A prefix argument acts as a
repeat count.
@item C-c C-p @key{RET}
Move to the previous message with the same subject as the current message
(@code{rmail-summary-previous-same-subject}).
@end table
@vindex rmail-redisplay-summary
......@@ -1117,13 +1128,12 @@ be a regular expression specifying which headers to display.
@kindex t @r{(Rmail)}
@findex rmail-toggle-header
Rmail saves the complete original header before reformatting; to see
it, use the @kbd{t} command (@code{rmail-toggle-header}). This
discards the reformatted headers of the current message and displays
it with the original header. Repeating @kbd{t} reformats the message
again, which shows only the interesting headers according to the
current values of the above variables. Selecting the message again also
reformats it if necessary.
To see the complete, original header, use the @kbd{t} command
(@code{rmail-toggle-header}). This discards the reformatted headers of
the current message and displays it with the original header. Repeating
@kbd{t} reformats the message again, which shows only the interesting
headers according to the current values of the above variables.
Selecting the message again also reformats it if necessary.
When the @kbd{t} command has a prefix argument, a positive argument
means to show the reformatted header, and a zero or negative argument
......
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