Commit 049224f6 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

(MS-DOS Keyboard, MS-DOS Mouse): Split from MS-DOS Input node.

(MS-DOS Keyboard): Start with explaining DEL and BREAK.
(MS-DOS and MULE): Clarify.
(MS-DOS Processes, Windows Processes): Fix typos.
parent 40be6653
......@@ -24,7 +24,8 @@ sections at the end of this chapter which apply specifically for the
Windows version.
@menu
* Input: MS-DOS Input. Keyboard and mouse usage on MS-DOS.
* Keyboard: MS-DOS Keyboard. Keyboard conventions on MS-DOS.
* Mouse: MS-DOS Mouse. Mouse conventions on MS-DOS.
* Display: MS-DOS Display. Fonts, frames and display size on MS-DOS.
* Files: MS-DOS File Names. File name conventions on MS-DOS.
* Text and Binary:: Text files on MS-DOS use CRLF to separate lines.
......@@ -35,8 +36,28 @@ Windows version.
* Windows System Menu:: Controlling what the ALT key does.
@end menu
@node MS-DOS Input
@section Keyboard and Mouse on MS-DOS
@node MS-DOS Keyboard
@section Keyboard Usage on MS-DOS
@kindex DEL @r{(MS-DOS)}
@kindex BS @r{(MS-DOS)}
The key that is called @key{DEL} in Emacs (because that's how it is
designated on most workstations) is known as @key{BS} (backspace) on a
PC. That is why the PC-specific terminal initialization remaps the
@key{BS} key to act as @key{DEL}; the @key{DELETE} key is remapped to act
as @kbd{C-d} for the same reasons.
@kindex C-g @r{(MS-DOS)}
@kindex C-BREAK @r{(MS-DOS)}
@cindex quitting on MS-DOS
Emacs built for MS-DOS recognizes @kbd{C-@key{BREAK}} as a quit
character, just like @kbd{C-g}. This is because Emacs cannot detect
that you have typed @kbd{C-g} until it is ready for more input. As a
consequence, you cannot use @kbd{C-g} to stop a running command
(@pxref{Quitting}). By contrast, @kbd{C-@key{BREAK}} @emph{is} detected
as soon as you type it (as @kbd{C-g} is on other systems), so it can be
used to stop a running command and for emergency escape
(@pxref{Emergency Escape}).
@cindex Meta (under MS-DOS)
@cindex Hyper (under MS-DOS)
......@@ -68,25 +89,8 @@ following line into your @file{_emacs} file:
(define-key function-key-map [kp-enter] [?\C-j])
@end smallexample
@kindex DEL @r{(MS-DOS)}
@kindex BS @r{(MS-DOS)}
The key that is called @key{DEL} in Emacs (because that's how it is
designated on most workstations) is known as @key{BS} (backspace) on a
PC. That is why the PC-specific terminal initialization remaps the
@key{BS} key to act as @key{DEL}; the @key{DEL} key is remapped to act
as @kbd{C-d} for the same reasons.
@kindex C-g @r{(MS-DOS)}
@kindex C-BREAK @r{(MS-DOS)}
@cindex quitting on MS-DOS
Emacs built for MS-DOS recognizes @kbd{C-@key{BREAK}} as a quit
character, just like @kbd{C-g}. This is because Emacs cannot detect
that you have typed @kbd{C-g} until it is ready for more input. As a
consequence, you cannot use @kbd{C-g} to stop a running command
(@pxref{Quitting}). By contrast, @kbd{C-@key{BREAK}} @emph{is} detected
as soon as you type it (as @kbd{C-g} is on other systems), so it can be
used to stop a running command and for emergency escape
(@pxref{Emergency Escape}).
@node MS-DOS Mouse
@section Mouse Usage on MS-DOS
@cindex mouse support under MS-DOS
Emacs on MS-DOS supports a mouse (on the default terminal only).
......@@ -281,7 +285,7 @@ only see their short 8+3 aliases.
@cindex @env{HOME} directory under MS-DOS
MS-DOS has no notion of home directory, so Emacs on MS-DOS pretends
that the directory where it is installed is the value of @env{HOME}
that the directory where it is installed is the value of the @env{HOME}
environment variable. That is, if your Emacs binary,
@file{emacs.exe}, is in the directory @file{c:/utils/emacs/bin}, then
Emacs acts as if @env{HOME} were set to @samp{c:/utils/emacs}. In
......@@ -603,11 +607,11 @@ etc.
MS-DOS normally doesn't allow use of several codepages in a single
session. MS-DOS was designed to load a single codepage at system
startup, and require you to reboot in order to change
it@footnote{Normally, one particular codepage is burnt into the display
memory, while other codepages can be installed by modifying system
configuration files, such as @file{CONFIG.SYS}, and rebooting. While
third-party software is known to exist that allows to change the
codepage without rebooting, we describe here how a stock MS-DOS system
it@footnote{Normally, one particular codepage is burnt into the
display memory, while other codepages can be installed by modifying
system configuration files, such as @file{CONFIG.SYS}, and rebooting.
While there is third-party software that allows changing the codepage
without rebooting, we describe here how a stock MS-DOS system
behaves.}. Much the same limitation applies when you run DOS
executables on other systems such as MS-Windows.
......@@ -749,7 +753,7 @@ asynchronous invocation on other platforms
the @kbd{M-x eshell} command. This invokes the Eshell package that
implements a Posix-like shell entirely in Emacs Lisp.
By contrast, Emacs compiled as native Windows application
By contrast, Emacs compiled as a native Windows application
@strong{does} support asynchronous subprocesses. @xref{Windows
Processes}.
......@@ -782,7 +786,7 @@ the @code{dired-listing-switches} variable. The options that work are
@node Windows Processes
@section Subprocesses on Windows 9X/ME and Windows NT/2K
Emacs compiled as a native Windows application (as opposed to the DOS
Emacs compiled as a native Windows application (as opposed to the DOS
version) includes full support for asynchronous subprocesses.
In the Windows version, synchronous and asynchronous subprocesses work
fine on both
......
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