Commit 053bc283 authored by Jay Belanger's avatar Jay Belanger
Browse files

Change @LaTeX to La@TeX throughout.

parent 44291460
2005-02-10 Jay Belanger <belanger@truman.edu>
* calc.texi: Change @LaTeX to La@TeX throughout.
2005-02-09 Jay Belanger <belanger@truman.edu>
* calc.texi: Add macro for LaTeX for info output.
......
......@@ -48,9 +48,6 @@
@macro cpiover{den}
@expr{pi/\den\}
@end macro
@macro LaTeX{}
La@TeX{}
@end macro
@end ifnottex
 
 
......@@ -739,7 +736,7 @@ these equations for the variables @expr{x} and @expr{y}.
Type @kbd{d B} to view the solutions in more readable notation.
Type @w{@kbd{d C}} to view them in C language notation, @kbd{d T}
to view them in the notation for the @TeX{} typesetting system,
and @kbd{d L} to view them in the notation for the @LaTeX{} typesetting
and @kbd{d L} to view them in the notation for the La@TeX{} typesetting
system. Type @kbd{d N} to return to normal notation.
 
@noindent
......@@ -1124,7 +1121,7 @@ is
Calc has added annotations to the file to help it remember the modes
that were used for this formula. They are formatted like comments
in the @TeX{} typesetting language, just in case you are using @TeX{} or
@LaTeX{}. (In this example @TeX{} is not being used, so you might want
La@TeX{}. (In this example @TeX{} is not being used, so you might want
to move these comments up to the top of the file or otherwise put them
out of the way.)
 
......@@ -5221,7 +5218,7 @@ One more mode that makes reading formulas easier is Big mode.
Here things like powers, square roots, and quotients and fractions
are displayed in a two-dimensional pictorial form. Calc has other
language modes as well, such as C mode, FORTRAN mode, @TeX{} mode
and @LaTeX{} mode.
and La@TeX{} mode.
 
@smallexample
@group
......@@ -13925,7 +13922,7 @@ left or right as you prefer.
@noindent
The commands in this section change Calc to use a different notation for
entry and display of formulas, corresponding to the conventions of some
other common language such as Pascal or @LaTeX{}. Objects displayed on the
other common language such as Pascal or La@TeX{}. Objects displayed on the
stack or yanked from the Calculator to an editing buffer will be formatted
in the current language; objects entered in algebraic entry or yanked from
another buffer will be interpreted according to the current language.
......@@ -13950,10 +13947,10 @@ the brackets in @samp{a[1]} and @samp{a[2]}, would not have known that
and would have written the formula back with notations (like implicit
multiplication) which would not have been legal for a C program.
 
As another example, suppose you are maintaining a C program and a @LaTeX{}
As another example, suppose you are maintaining a C program and a La@TeX{}
document, each of which needs a copy of the same formula. You can grab the
formula from the program in C mode, switch to @LaTeX{} mode, and yank the
formula into the document in @LaTeX{} math-mode format.
formula from the program in C mode, switch to La@TeX{} mode, and yank the
formula into the document in La@TeX{} math-mode format.
 
Language modes are selected by typing the letter @kbd{d} followed by a
shifted letter key.
......@@ -14147,7 +14144,7 @@ convert to lower-case on input. With a negative prefix, these modes
convert to lower-case for display and input.
 
@node TeX and LaTeX Language Modes, Eqn Language Mode, C FORTRAN Pascal, Language Modes
@subsection @TeX{} and @LaTeX{} Language Modes
@subsection @TeX{} and La@TeX{} Language Modes
 
@noindent
@kindex d T
......@@ -14159,38 +14156,38 @@ convert to lower-case for display and input.
The @kbd{d T} (@code{calc-tex-language}) command selects the conventions
of ``math mode'' in Donald Knuth's @TeX{} typesetting language,
and the @kbd{d L} (@code{calc-latex-language}) command selects the
conventions of ``math mode'' in @LaTeX{}, a typesetting language that
uses @TeX{} as its formatting engine. Calc's @LaTeX{} language mode can
read any formula that the @TeX{} language mode can, although @LaTeX{}
conventions of ``math mode'' in La@TeX{}, a typesetting language that
uses @TeX{} as its formatting engine. Calc's La@TeX{} language mode can
read any formula that the @TeX{} language mode can, although La@TeX{}
mode may display it differently.
 
Formulas are entered and displayed in the appropriate notation;
@texline @math{\sin(a/b)}
@infoline @expr{sin(a/b)}
will appear as @samp{\sin\left( a \over b \right)} in @TeX{} mode and
@samp{\sin\left(\frac@{a@}@{b@}\right)} in @LaTeX{} mode.
@samp{\sin\left(\frac@{a@}@{b@}\right)} in La@TeX{} mode.
Math formulas are often enclosed by @samp{$ $} signs in @TeX{} and
@LaTeX{}; these should be omitted when interfacing with Calc. To Calc,
La@TeX{}; these should be omitted when interfacing with Calc. To Calc,
the @samp{$} sign has the same meaning it always does in algebraic
formulas (a reference to an existing entry on the stack).
 
Complex numbers are displayed as in @samp{3 + 4i}. Fractions and
quotients are written using @code{\over} in @TeX{} mode (as in
@code{@{a \over b@}}) and @code{\frac} in @LaTeX{} mode (as in
@code{@{a \over b@}}) and @code{\frac} in La@TeX{} mode (as in
@code{\frac@{a@}@{b@}}); binomial coefficients are written with
@code{\choose} in @TeX{} mode (as in @code{@{a \choose b@}}) and
@code{\binom} in @LaTeX{} mode (as in @code{\binom@{a@}@{b@}}).
@code{\binom} in La@TeX{} mode (as in @code{\binom@{a@}@{b@}}).
Interval forms are written with @code{\ldots}, and error forms are
written with @code{\pm}. Absolute values are written as in
@samp{|x + 1|}, and the floor and ceiling functions are written with
@code{\lfloor}, @code{\rfloor}, etc. The words @code{\left} and
@code{\right} are ignored when reading formulas in @TeX{} and @LaTeX{}
@code{\right} are ignored when reading formulas in @TeX{} and La@TeX{}
modes. Both @code{inf} and @code{uinf} are written as @code{\infty};
when read, @code{\infty} always translates to @code{inf}.
 
Function calls are written the usual way, with the function name followed
by the arguments in parentheses. However, functions for which @TeX{}
and @LaTeX{} have special names (like @code{\sin}) will use curly braces
and La@TeX{} have special names (like @code{\sin}) will use curly braces
instead of parentheses for very simple arguments. During input, curly
braces and parentheses work equally well for grouping, but when the
document is formatted the curly braces will be invisible. Thus the
......@@ -14201,14 +14198,14 @@ but
@texline @math{\sin(2 + x)}.
@infoline @expr{sin(2 + x)}.
 
Function and variable names not treated specially by @TeX{} and @LaTeX{}
Function and variable names not treated specially by @TeX{} and La@TeX{}
are simply written out as-is, which will cause them to come out in
italic letters in the printed document. If you invoke @kbd{d T} or
@kbd{d L} with a positive numeric prefix argument, names of more than
one character will instead be enclosed in a protective commands that
will prevent them from being typeset in the math italics; they will be
written @samp{\hbox@{@var{name}@}} in @TeX{} mode and
@samp{\text@{@var{name}@}} in @LaTeX{} mode. The
@samp{\text@{@var{name}@}} in La@TeX{} mode. The
@samp{\hbox@{ @}} and @samp{\text@{ @}} notations are ignored during
reading. If you use a negative prefix argument, such function names are
written @samp{\@var{name}}, and function names that begin with @code{\} during
......@@ -14219,7 +14216,7 @@ any @TeX{} mode.)
 
During reading, text of the form @samp{\matrix@{ ...@: @}} is replaced
by @samp{[ ...@: ]}. The same also applies to @code{\pmatrix} and
@code{\bmatrix}. In @LaTeX{} mode this also applies to
@code{\bmatrix}. In La@TeX{} mode this also applies to
@samp{\begin@{matrix@} ... \end@{matrix@}},
@samp{\begin@{bmatrix@} ... \end@{bmatrix@}},
@samp{\begin@{pmatrix@} ... \end@{pmatrix@}}, as well as
......@@ -14229,7 +14226,7 @@ and the symbols @samp{\cr} and @samp{\\} are interpreted as semicolons.
During output, matrices are displayed in @samp{\matrix@{ a & b \\ c & d@}}
format in @TeX{} mode and in
@samp{\begin@{pmatrix@} a & b \\ c & d \end@{pmatrix@}} format in
@LaTeX{} mode; you may need to edit this afterwards to change to your
La@TeX{} mode; you may need to edit this afterwards to change to your
preferred matrix form. If you invoke @kbd{d T} or @kbd{d L} with an
argument of 2 or -2, then matrices will be displayed in two-dimensional
form, such as
......@@ -14253,7 +14250,7 @@ c & d
@end example
 
@noindent
While this wouldn't bother Calc, it is incorrect @LaTeX{}.
While this wouldn't bother Calc, it is incorrect La@TeX{}.
(Similarly for @TeX{}.)
 
Accents like @code{\tilde} and @code{\bar} translate into function
......@@ -14261,7 +14258,7 @@ calls internally (@samp{tilde(x)}, @samp{bar(x)}). The @code{\underline}
sequence is treated as an accent. The @code{\vec} accent corresponds
to the function name @code{Vec}, because @code{vec} is the name of
a built-in Calc function. The following table shows the accents
in Calc, @TeX{}, @LaTeX{} and @dfn{eqn} (described in the next section):
in Calc, @TeX{}, La@TeX{} and @dfn{eqn} (described in the next section):
 
@iftex
@begingroup
......@@ -14436,7 +14433,7 @@ reading is:
@end example
 
Note that, because these symbols are ignored, reading a @TeX{} or
@LaTeX{} formula into Calc and writing it back out may lose spacing and
La@TeX{} formula into Calc and writing it back out may lose spacing and
font information.
 
Also, the ``discretionary multiplication sign'' @samp{\*} is read
......@@ -14607,7 +14604,7 @@ treated the same as a space in @dfn{eqn} mode, as is the @samp{~}
symbol (these are used to introduce spaces of various widths into
the typeset output of @dfn{eqn}).
 
As in @LaTeX{} mode, Calc's formatter omits parentheses around the
As in La@TeX{} mode, Calc's formatter omits parentheses around the
arguments of functions like @code{ln} and @code{sin} if they are
``simple-looking''; in this case Calc surrounds the argument with
braces, separated by a @samp{~} from the function name: @samp{sin~@{x@}}.
......@@ -15939,7 +15936,7 @@ FORTRAN language mode (@kbd{d F}).
@TeX{} language mode (@kbd{d T}; @pxref{TeX and LaTeX Language Modes}).
 
@item LaTeX
@LaTeX{} language mode (@kbd{d L}; @pxref{TeX and LaTeX Language Modes}).
La@TeX{} language mode (@kbd{d L}; @pxref{TeX and LaTeX Language Modes}).
 
@item Eqn
@dfn{Eqn} language mode (@kbd{d E}; @pxref{Eqn Language Mode}).
......@@ -28353,7 +28350,7 @@ since the evaluation step will also evaluate @code{pi}.
@cindex @samp{=>} operator
The special algebraic symbol @samp{=>} is known as the @dfn{evaluates-to
operator}. (It will show up as an @code{evalto} function call in
other language modes like Pascal and @LaTeX{}.) This is a binary
other language modes like Pascal and La@TeX{}.) This is a binary
operator, that is, it has a lefthand and a righthand argument,
although it can be entered with the righthand argument omitted.
 
......@@ -30008,16 +30005,16 @@ you haven't done anything with this formula yet.
When Embedded mode ``activates'' a formula, i.e., when it examines
the formula for the first time since the buffer was created or
loaded, Calc tries to sense the language in which the formula was
written. If the formula contains any @LaTeX{}-like @samp{\} sequences,
it is parsed (i.e., read) in @LaTeX{} mode. If the formula appears to
written. If the formula contains any La@TeX{}-like @samp{\} sequences,
it is parsed (i.e., read) in La@TeX{} mode. If the formula appears to
be written in multi-line Big mode, it is parsed in Big mode. Otherwise,
it is parsed according to the current language mode.
 
Note that Calc does not change the current language mode according
to what it finds. Even though it can read a @LaTeX{} formula when
not in @LaTeX{} mode, it will immediately rewrite this formula using
to what it finds. Even though it can read a La@TeX{} formula when
not in La@TeX{} mode, it will immediately rewrite this formula using
whatever language mode is in effect. You must then type @kbd{d L}
to switch Calc permanently into @LaTeX{} mode if that is what you
to switch Calc permanently into La@TeX{} mode if that is what you
desire.
 
@tex
......@@ -30038,8 +30035,8 @@ version.
 
Plain formulas are preceded and followed by @samp{%%%} signs
by default. This notation has the advantage that the @samp{%}
character begins a comment in @TeX{} and @LaTeX{}, so if your formula is
embedded in a @TeX{} or @LaTeX{} document its plain version will be
character begins a comment in @TeX{} and La@TeX{}, so if your formula is
embedded in a @TeX{} or La@TeX{} document its plain version will be
invisible in the final printed copy. @xref{Customizing
Embedded Mode}, to see how to change the ``plain'' formula
delimiters, say to something that @dfn{eqn} or some other
......@@ -30329,7 +30326,7 @@ a few lines that look like this:
@noindent
where the leading and trailing @samp{---} can be replaced by
any suitable strings (which must be the same on all three lines)
or omitted altogether; in a @TeX{} or @LaTeX{} file, @samp{%} would be a good
or omitted altogether; in a @TeX{} or La@TeX{} file, @samp{%} would be a good
leading string and no trailing string would be necessary. In a
C program, @samp{/*} and @samp{*/} would be good leading and
trailing strings.
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