Commit 05f7d0d3 authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris

More small edits for doc/emacs/mule.texi

* mule.texi (Select Input Method, Coding Systems, Recognize Coding):
Copyedits.
(Coding Systems): Mac OS X apparently uses newlines for EOL.
(Recognize Coding): Remove old auto-coding-regexp-alist example.
auto-coding-functions does not override coding: tags.
Remove rmail-decode-mime-charset; it no longer has any effect.
parent 050bb9b3
2012-04-13 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* mule.texi (Select Input Method, Coding Systems, Recognize Coding):
Copyedits.
(Coding Systems): Mac OS X apparently uses newlines for EOL.
(Recognize Coding): Remove old auto-coding-regexp-alist example.
auto-coding-functions does not override coding: tags.
Remove rmail-decode-mime-charset; it no longer has any effect.
2012-04-12 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
* custom.texi (Creating Custom Themes): Add reference to Custom
......
......@@ -614,7 +614,7 @@ turn off the input method temporarily. To do this, type @kbd{C-\}
@kbd{C-\} again.
If you type @kbd{C-\} and you have not yet selected an input method,
it prompts for you to specify one. This has the same effect as using
it prompts you to specify one. This has the same effect as using
@kbd{C-x @key{RET} C-\} to specify an input method.
When invoked with a numeric argument, as in @kbd{C-u C-\},
......@@ -657,7 +657,7 @@ automatically. For example:
@end lisp
@noindent
This activates the input method ``german-prefix'' automatically in the
This automatically activates the input method ``german-prefix'' in
Text mode.
@findex quail-set-keyboard-layout
......@@ -671,7 +671,7 @@ the command @kbd{M-x quail-set-keyboard-layout}.
You can use the command @kbd{M-x quail-show-key} to show what key (or
key sequence) to type in order to input the character following point,
using the selected keyboard layout. The command @kbd{C-u C-x =} also
shows that information in addition to the other information about the
shows that information, in addition to other information about the
character.
@findex list-input-methods
......@@ -711,7 +711,8 @@ system; for example, to visit a file encoded in codepage 850, type
In addition to converting various representations of non-@acronym{ASCII}
characters, a coding system can perform end-of-line conversion. Emacs
handles three different conventions for how to separate lines in a file:
newline, carriage-return linefeed, and just carriage-return.
newline (``unix''), carriage-return linefeed (``dos''), and just
carriage-return (``mac'').
@table @kbd
@item C-h C @var{coding} @key{RET}
......@@ -751,27 +752,27 @@ end-of-line conversion to be decided based on the contents of each file.
For example, if the file appears to use the sequence carriage-return
linefeed to separate lines, DOS end-of-line conversion will be used.
Each of the listed coding systems has three variants which specify
Each of the listed coding systems has three variants, which specify
exactly what to do for end-of-line conversion:
@table @code
@item @dots{}-unix
Don't do any end-of-line conversion; assume the file uses
newline to separate lines. (This is the convention normally used
on Unix and GNU systems.)
on Unix and GNU systems, and Mac OS X.)
@item @dots{}-dos
Assume the file uses carriage-return linefeed to separate lines, and do
the appropriate conversion. (This is the convention normally used on
Microsoft systems.@footnote{It is also specified for MIME @samp{text/*}
bodies and in other network transport contexts. It is different
from the SGML reference syntax record-start/record-end format which
from the SGML reference syntax record-start/record-end format, which
Emacs doesn't support directly.})
@item @dots{}-mac
Assume the file uses carriage-return to separate lines, and do the
appropriate conversion. (This is the convention normally used on the
Macintosh system.)
appropriate conversion. (This was the convention used on the
Macintosh system prior to OS X.)
@end table
These variant coding systems are omitted from the
......@@ -789,7 +790,7 @@ be deduced from the text itself.
@cindex @code{raw-text}, coding system
The coding system @code{raw-text} is good for a file which is mainly
@acronym{ASCII} text, but may contain byte values above 127 which are
@acronym{ASCII} text, but may contain byte values above 127 that are
not meant to encode non-@acronym{ASCII} characters. With
@code{raw-text}, Emacs copies those byte values unchanged, and sets
@code{enable-multibyte-characters} to @code{nil} in the current buffer
......@@ -906,37 +907,47 @@ the buffer.
The default value of @code{inhibit-iso-escape-detection} is
@code{nil}. We recommend that you not change it permanently, only for
one specific operation. That's because many Emacs Lisp source files
one specific operation. That's because some Emacs Lisp source files
in the Emacs distribution contain non-@acronym{ASCII} characters encoded in the
coding system @code{iso-2022-7bit}, and they won't be
decoded correctly when you visit those files if you suppress the
escape sequence detection.
@c I count a grand total of 3 such files, so is the above really true?
@vindex auto-coding-alist
@vindex auto-coding-regexp-alist
@vindex auto-coding-functions
The variables @code{auto-coding-alist},
@code{auto-coding-regexp-alist} and @code{auto-coding-functions} are
The variables @code{auto-coding-alist} and
@code{auto-coding-regexp-alist} are
the strongest way to specify the coding system for certain patterns of
file names, or for files containing certain patterns; these variables
even override @samp{-*-coding:-*-} tags in the file itself. Emacs
file names, or for files containing certain patterns, respectively.
These variables even override @samp{-*-coding:-*-} tags in the file
itself. For example, Emacs
uses @code{auto-coding-alist} for tar and archive files, to prevent it
from being confused by a @samp{-*-coding:-*-} tag in a member of the
archive and thinking it applies to the archive file as a whole.
@ignore
@c This describes old-style BABYL files, which are no longer relevant.
Likewise, Emacs uses @code{auto-coding-regexp-alist} to ensure that
RMAIL files, whose names in general don't match any particular
pattern, are decoded correctly. One of the builtin
pattern, are decoded correctly.
@end ignore
@vindex auto-coding-functions
Another way to specify a coding system is with the variable
@code{auto-coding-functions}. For example, one of the builtin
@code{auto-coding-functions} detects the encoding for XML files.
Unlike the previous two, this variable does not override any
@samp{-*-coding:-*-} tag.
@c FIXME? This seems somewhat out of place. Move to the Rmail section?
@vindex rmail-decode-mime-charset
@vindex rmail-file-coding-system
When you get new mail in Rmail, each message is translated
automatically from the coding system it is written in, as if it were a
separate file. This uses the priority list of coding systems that you
have specified. If a MIME message specifies a character set, Rmail
obeys that specification, unless @code{rmail-decode-mime-charset} is
@code{nil}. For reading and saving Rmail files themselves, Emacs uses
the coding system specified by the variable
obeys that specification. For reading and saving Rmail files
themselves, Emacs uses the coding system specified by the variable
@code{rmail-file-coding-system}. The default value is @code{nil},
which means that Rmail files are not translated (they are read and
written in the Emacs internal character code).
......
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