Commit 099bfef9 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

Delete info on Font Lock Support Modes.

Rewrite tool bar info.  Rewrite wheeled mouse section.
Rewrite Hi-Lock section.  Rewrite trailing whitespace section.
Move indicate-empty-lines into trailing whitespace section.
Move busy-cursor stuff to display.texi.
Rename Misc X node to Frame Commands, and move it.
Many minor changes.
parent 697e2b99
@c This is part of the Emacs manual.
\@c This is part of the Emacs manual.
@c Copyright (C) 1985, 86, 87, 93, 94, 95, 1997, 2000 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@c See file emacs.texi for copying conditions.
@node Display, Search, Registers, Top
......@@ -17,6 +17,7 @@ display it.
* Optional Mode Line:: Optional mode line display features.
* Text Display:: How text characters are normally displayed.
* Display Custom:: Information on variables for customizing display.
* Cursor Display:: Features for displaying the cursor.
@end menu
@node Scrolling
......@@ -459,16 +460,35 @@ will be done less frequently.
by means of a display table. @xref{Display Tables,, Display Tables,
elisp, The Emacs Lisp Reference Manual}.
@cindex busy-cursor display
@vindex busy-cursor-delay
On a window system, Emacs can optionally display the mouse pointer
in a special shape to say that Emacs is busy. To turn this feature on
or off, customize the group @code{cursor}. You can also control the
amount of time Emacs must remain busy before the busy indicator is
displayed, by setting the variable @code{busy-cursor-delay}.
@node Cursor Display
@section Displaying the Cursor
@findex hl-line-mode
@findex blink-cursor-mode
@cindex cursor, locating visually
@cindex cursor, blinking
There are a number of ways to customize the display of the cursor.
@kbd{M-x hl-line-mode} enables or disables a global minor mode which
highlights the line around point. On window systems, the command
highlights the line containing point. On window systems, the command
@kbd{M-x blink-cursor-mode} turns on or off the blinking of the
cursor. (On terminals, the terminal itself blinks the cursor, and
Emacs has no control over it.)
You can customize the cursor's color, and whether it blinks, using
the @code{cursor} Custom group (@pxref{Easy Customization}).
@vindex x-stretch-cursor
@cindex wide block cursor
When displaying on a window system, Emacs can optionally draw the
block cursor as wide as the character under the cursor---for example,
if the cursor is on a tab character, it would cover the full width
occupied by that tab character. To enable this feature, set the
variable @code{x-stretch-cursor} to a non-@code{nil} value.
......@@ -31,14 +31,14 @@ so that you can use many of the features described in this chapter.
@cindex MS Windows
Emacs compiled for MS Windows mostly supports the same features as
under X. However, as of version 21.1, images, tool bars, and tooltips
are not yet available on MS Windows.
under X. However, images, tool bars, and tooltips are not yet
available on MS Windows as of Emacs version 21.1.
Features which rely on text in multiple faces (such as Font Lock mode)
will also work on non-windowed terminals that can display more than one
face, whether by colors or underlining and emboldening, such as the
Linux console. Emacs determines automatically whether the terminal has
such support.
Features which rely on text in multiple faces (such as Font Lock
mode) will also work on non-windowed terminals that can display more
than one face, whether by colors or underlining and emboldening. This
includes the console on GNU/Linux. Emacs determines automatically
whether the terminal has this capability.
@menu
* Mouse Commands:: Moving, cutting, and pasting, with the mouse.
......@@ -47,8 +47,9 @@ such support.
* Mouse References:: Using the mouse to select an item from a list.
* Menu Mouse Clicks:: Mouse clicks that bring up menus.
* Mode Line Mouse:: Mouse clicks on the mode line.
* Speedbar:: How to make and use a speedbar frame.
* Creating Frames:: Creating additional Emacs frames with various contents.
* Frame Commands:: Iconifying, deleting, and switching frames.
* Speedbar:: How to make and use a speedbar frame.
* Multiple Displays:: How one Emacs job can talk to several displays.
* Special Buffer Frames:: You can make certain buffers have their own frames.
* Frame Parameters:: Changing the colors and other modes of frames.
......@@ -59,13 +60,11 @@ such support.
* Dialog Boxes:: Controlling use of dialog boxes.
* Faces:: How to change the display style using faces.
* Font Lock:: Minor mode for syntactic highlighting using faces.
* Support Modes:: Font Lock support modes make Font Lock faster.
* Highlight Changes:: Using colors to show where you changed the buffer.
* Highlight Interactively:: Tell Emacs what text to highlight.
* Trailing Whitespace:: Showing possibly-spurious trailing whitespace.
* Tooltips:: Showing `tooltips', AKA `ballon help' for active text.
* Mouse Avoidance:: Moving the mouse pointer out of the way.
* Misc X:: Iconifying and deleting frames.
* Non-Window Terminals:: Multiple frames on terminals that show only one.
* XTerm Mouse:: Using the mouse in an XTerm terminal emulator.
@end menu
......@@ -272,15 +271,15 @@ that matters is which window you click on. @xref{Mouse Commands}.
@cindex OpenWindows
@cindex Gnome
As well as the primary and secondary selection types, X supports a
As well as the primary and secondary selection types, X supports a
@dfn{clipboard} selection type which is used by some applications,
particularly under OpenWindows and Gnome.
The command @kbd{M-x menu-bar-enable-clipboard} makes the @code{Cut},
The command @kbd{M-x menu-bar-enable-clipboard} makes the @code{Cut},
@code{Paste} and @code{Copy} menu items, as well as the keys of the same
names, all use the clipboard.
You can customize the option @code{x-select-enable-clipboard} to make
You can customize the option @code{x-select-enable-clipboard} to make
the Emacs yank functions consult the clipboard before the primary
selection, and to make the kill functions to store in the clipboard as
well as the primary selection. Otherwise they do not access the
......@@ -325,7 +324,7 @@ This menu is for selecting a buffer.
The MSB (`mouse select buffer') global minor mode alters this menu to a
form some people prefer and which is customizable. See the Custom group
@code{msb}.
@code{msb} (@pxref{Easy Customization}).
@item C-Mouse-2
@kindex C-Mouse-2
......@@ -345,7 +344,7 @@ contains all the items which would be present in the menu bar---not just
the mode-specific ones---so that you can access them without having to
display the menu bar.
@item S-mouse-1
@item S-Mouse-1
This menu is for specifying the frame's principal font.
@end table
......@@ -359,36 +358,37 @@ windows.
@table @kbd
@item Mouse-1
@kindex mode-line mouse-1
@kindex Mouse-1 @r{(mode line)}
@kbd{Mouse-1} on a mode line selects the window above. By dragging
@kbd{Mouse-1} on the mode line, you can move it, thus changing the
height of the windows above and below.
@item Mouse-2
@kindex mode-line mouse-2
@kindex Mouse-2 @r{(mode line)}
@kbd{Mouse-2} on a mode line expands that window to fill its frame.
@item Mouse-3
@kindex mode-line mouse-3
@kindex Mouse-3 @r{(mode line)}
@kbd{Mouse-3} on a mode line deletes the window above. If the frame has
only one window, it buries the current buffer instead and switches to
another buffer.
@item C-Mouse-2
@kindex mode-line C-mouse-2
@kindex C-mouse-2 @r{(mode line)}
@kbd{C-Mouse-2} on a mode line splits the window above
horizontally, above the place in the mode line where you click.
@end table
@kindex vertical-scroll-bar mouse-1
@kindex C-Mouse-2 @r{(scroll bar)}
@kbd{C-Mouse-2} on a scroll bar splits the corresponding window
vertically. @xref{Split Window}.
vertically, unless you are using an X toolkit's implentation of
scroll bars. @xref{Split Window}.
The commands above apply to areas of the mode line which do not have
mouse bindings of their own. Normally some areas, such as those
displaying the buffer name and the major mode name, have their own mouse
bindings. Help on these bindings is echoed when the mouse is positioned
over them.
The commands above apply to areas of the mode line which do not have
special mouse bindings of their own. Some areas, such as the buffer
name and the major mode name, have their own special mouse bindings.
Emacs displays information about these bindings when you hold the
mouse over such a place.
@node Creating Frames
@section Creating Frames
......@@ -457,6 +457,40 @@ parameter, as shown here:
(add-to-list 'default-frame-alist '(font . "10x20"))
@end example
@node Frame Commands
@section Frame Commands
The following commands let you create, delete and operate on frames:
@table @kbd
@item C-z
@kindex C-z @r{(X windows)}
@findex iconify-or-deiconify-frame
Iconify the selected Emacs frame (@code{iconify-or-deiconify-frame}).
The normal meaning of @kbd{C-z}, to suspend Emacs, is not useful under a
window system, so it has a different binding in that case.
If you type this command on an Emacs frame's icon, it deiconifies the frame.
@item C-x 5 0
@kindex C-x 5 0
@findex delete-frame
Delete the selected frame (@code{delete-frame}). This is not allowed if
there is only one frame.
@item C-x 5 o
@kindex C-x 5 o
@findex other-frame
Select another frame, raise it, and warp the mouse to it so that it
stays selected. If you repeat this command, it cycles through all the
frames on your terminal.
@item C-x 5 1
@kindex C-x 5 1
@findex delete-other-frames
Delete all frames except the selected one.
@end table
@node Speedbar
@section Making and Using a Speedbar Frame
@cindex speedbar
......@@ -715,22 +749,20 @@ setting of Scroll Bar mode similarly. @xref{Resources X}.
@kbd{M-x toggle-scroll-bar} command.
@node Wheeled Mice
@section Scrolling With `Wheeled' Mice
@cindex Mouse Wheel mode
@findex mouse-wheel-mode
@vindex mouse-wheel-mode
Some mice have a `wheel' instead of a third button. You can usually
click the wheel to act as @kbd{mouse-2}. You can also use the wheel
to scroll windows instead of using the scroll bar or keyboard
commands. Use @kbd{M-x mouse-wheel-mode} to enable or disable
scrolling with the wheel, or customize the option
@code{mouse-wheel-mode}. (Support for the wheel depends on the system
generating appropriate events for Emacs.)
@section Scrolling With ``Wheeled'' Mice
@cindex mouse wheel
@findex mouse-wheel-install
Some mice have a `wheel' instead of a third button. You can usually
click the wheel to act as @kbd{Mouse-3}. You can also use the wheel to
scroll windows instead of using the scroll bar or keyboard commands.
Use @kbd{M-x mouse-wheel-install} to set up the wheel for scrolling or put
@samp{(require 'mouse-wheel)} in your @file{.emacs}. (Support for the wheel
depends on the system generating appropriate events for Emacs.)
@vindex mouse-wheel-follow-mouse
@vindex mouse-wheel-scroll-amount
The variables @code{mouse-wheel-follow-mouse} and
The variables @code{mouse-wheel-follow-mouse} and
@code{mouse-wheel-scroll-amount} determine where and by how much
buffers are scrolled.
......@@ -747,12 +779,12 @@ argument is positive, off if the argument is not positive. You can use
the X resource @samp{menuBarLines} to control the initial setting of
Menu Bar mode. @xref{Resources X}.
@kindex C-Mouse-3@r{, when menu bar is turned off}
Expert users often turn off the menu bar, especially on text-only
terminals, where this makes one additional line available for text. If
the menu bar is off, you can still pop up a menu of its contents with
@kbd{C-mouse-3} on a display which supports popup menus. @xref{Menu
Mouse Clicks}.
@kindex C-Mouse-3 @r{(when menu bar is disabled)}
Expert users often turn off the menu bar, especially on text-only
terminals, where this makes one additional line available for text.
If the menu bar is off, you can still pop up a menu of its contents
with @kbd{C-Mouse-3} on a display which supports popup menus.
@xref{Menu Mouse Clicks}.
@xref{Menu Bar}, for information on how to invoke commands with the
menu bar.
......@@ -763,41 +795,47 @@ menu bar.
@cindex mode, Tool Bar
@cindex icons, tool bar
You can turn display of tool bars on or off with @kbd{M-x tool-bar-mode}
analogously to @code{menu-bar-mode}. @xref{Menu Bars}. This will only
work in an Emacs with appropriate image support for the available icons
on a graphic display. (In particular, the MS-Windows version doesn't
support tool bars as of version 21.1.) By default, monochrome (PBM or
XBM format) icons are used. XPM format icons, which normally look
better, will normally be used if Emacs was built with XPM support.
The @dfn{tool bar} is a line (or multiple lines) of icons at the top
of the Emacs window. You can click on these icons with the mouse
to do various jobs.
The global tool bar contains general commands. Some major modes
define their own tool bars to replace it. A few ``special'' modes
that are not designed for ordinary editing remove some items from the
global tool bar.
There is a global tool bar with useful items and some modes define their
own tool bars to replace it.@footnote{We could provide more if suitable
icons are contributed.} Some items are removed from the global bar in
`special' modes not designed for editing text.
Tool bars work only on a graphical display and only when Emacs is
compiled with image support. The tool bar uses colored XPM icons if
Emacs was built with XPM support. Otherwise, the tool bar uses
monochrome icons (PBM or XBM format).
You can turn display of tool bars on or off with @kbd{M-x
tool-bar-mode}.
@node Dialog Boxes
@section Using Dialog Boxes
@cindex dialog boxes
@vindex use-dialog-box
Certain operations invoked from menus will use a window system dialog
box to get information via the mouse if such dialog boxes are supported.
This includes yes/no questions and file selection under Motif/LessTif
and MS Windows. Customize the option @code{use-dialog-box} to suppress
the use of dialog boxes.
A dialog box is a special kind of menu for asking you a yes-or-no
question or some other special question. Many Emacs commands use a
dialog box to ask a yes-or-no question, if you used the mouse to
invoke the command to begin with.
You can customize the option @code{use-dialog-box} to suppress the
use of dialog boxes. This also controls whether to use file selection
windows (but those are not supported on all platforms).
@node Faces
@section Using Multiple Typefaces
@cindex faces
When using Emacs with X, you can set up multiple styles of displaying
characters. The aspects of style that you can control are the type
font, the foreground color, the background color, and whether to
underline. Emacs on MS-DOS supports faces partially by letting you
control the foreground and background colors of each face
(@pxref{MS-DOS}). On non-windowed terminals faces are supported to the
extent the terminal can display them.
When using Emacs with a window system, you can set up multiple
styles of displaying characters. The aspects of style that you can
control are the type font, the foreground color, the background color,
and whether to underline. On non-windowed terminals (including
MS-DOS, @pxref{MS-DOS}), Emacs supports faces to the extent the
terminal can display them.
The way you control display style is by defining named @dfn{faces}.
Each face can specify a type font, a foreground color, a background
......@@ -822,10 +860,10 @@ attributes of particular faces (@pxref{Resources X}).
@cindex face colors, setting
@findex set-face-foreground
@findex set-face-background
Alternatively, you could change the foreground and background colors
Alternatively, you can change the foreground and background colors
of a specific face with @kbd{M-x set-face-foreground} and @kbd{M-x
set-face-background}. These commands prompt in the minibuffer for a
face name and a color name, with completion, and then setup that face to
face name and a color name, with completion, and then set that face to
use the specified color.
@findex list-faces-display
......@@ -840,8 +878,8 @@ faces:
This face is used for ordinary text that doesn't specify any other face.
@item modeline
This face is used for mode lines. By default, it's drawn with shadows
for a `raised' effect under X and set up as the inverse of the default
face on non-windowed terminals. @xref{Display Vars}.
for a ``raised'' effect on window systems, and drawn as the inverse of
the default face on non-windowed terminals. @xref{Display Vars}.
@item header-line
Similar to @code{modeline} for a window's header line.
@item highlight
......@@ -873,7 +911,8 @@ This face determines the color of the cursor.
@item mouse
This face determines the color of the mouse pointer.
@item tool-bar
The basic tool-bar face.
The basic tool-bar face. No text appears in the tool bar, but the
colors of this face affect the appearance of tool bar icons.
@item menu
This face determines the colors and font of Emacs's menus. Setting the
font of LessTif/Motif menus is currently not supported; attempts to set
......@@ -934,24 +973,30 @@ Font Lock mode whenever you edit a C file, you can do this:
@findex global-font-lock-mode
@vindex global-font-lock-mode
To turn on Font Lock mode automatically in all modes which support it,
customize the user option @code{global-font-lock-mode} or use the
function @code{global-font-lock-mode}, like this:
To turn on Font Lock mode automatically in all modes which support
it, customize the user option @code{global-font-lock-mode} or use the
function @code{global-font-lock-mode} in your @file{.emacs} file, like
this:
@example
(global-font-lock-mode 1)
@end example
Font Lock mode uses several specifically named faces to do its job,
including @code{font-lock-string-face}, @code{font-lock-comment-face},
and others. The easiest way to find them all is to use completion
on the face name in @code{set-face-foreground}.
To change the colors or the fonts used by Font Lock mode to fontify
different parts of text, you can use one of the following:
different parts of text, just change these faces. There are
two ways to do it:
@itemize @bullet
@item
Invoke @kbd{M-x set-face-foreground} or @kbd{M-x set-face-background} to
change the colors of a particular face, such as
@code{font-lock-variable-name-face}, used by Font Lock. @xref{Faces}.
The command @kbd{M-x list-faces-display} displays all the faces
currently known to Emacs, including those used by Font Lock.
Invoke @kbd{M-x set-face-foreground} or @kbd{M-x set-face-background}
to change the colors of a particular face used by Font Lock.
@xref{Faces}. The command @kbd{M-x list-faces-display} displays all
the faces currently known to Emacs, including those used by Font Lock.
@item
Customize the faces interactively with @kbd{M-x customize-face}, as
......@@ -1033,186 +1078,6 @@ comments, use this:
'(("\\<\\(FIXME\\):" 1 font-lock-warning-face t)))
@end example
@node Support Modes
@section Font Lock Support Modes
Font Lock support modes make Font Lock mode faster for large buffers.
There are two support modes: Fast Lock mode and Lazy Lock mode. They
use two different methods of speeding up Font Lock mode.
@menu
* Fast Lock Mode:: Saving font information in files.
* Lazy Lock Mode:: Fontifying only text that is actually displayed.
* JIT Lock Mode:: Like Lazy Lock, but generally faster.
* Fast or Lazy:: Which support mode is best for you?
@end menu
@node Fast Lock Mode
@subsection Fast Lock Mode
@cindex Fast Lock mode
@cindex mode, Fast Lock
To make Font Lock mode faster for buffers visiting large files, you
can use Fast Lock mode. Fast Lock mode saves the font information for
each file in a separate cache file; each time you visit the file, it
rereads the font information from the cache file instead of refontifying
the text from scratch.
@findex fast-lock-mode
The command @kbd{M-x fast-lock-mode} turns Fast Lock mode on or off,
according to the argument (with no argument, it toggles). You can also
arrange to enable Fast Lock mode whenever you use Font Lock mode, like
this:
@example
(setq font-lock-support-mode 'fast-lock-mode)
@end example
@vindex fast-lock-minimum-size
It is not worth writing a cache file for small buffers. Therefore,
the variable @code{fast-lock-minimum-size} specifies a minimum file size
for caching font information.
@vindex fast-lock-cache-directories
The variable @code{fast-lock-cache-directories} specifies where to put
the cache files. Its value is a list of directories to try; @code{"."}
means the same directory as the file being edited. The default value is
@w{@code{("." "~/.emacs-flc")}}, which means to use the same directory if
possible, and otherwise the directory @file{~/.emacs-flc}.
@vindex fast-lock-save-others
The variable @code{fast-lock-save-others} specifies whether Fast Lock
mode should save cache files for files that you do not own. A
non-@code{nil} value means yes (and that is the default).
@node Lazy Lock Mode
@subsection Lazy Lock Mode
@cindex Lazy Lock mode
@cindex mode, Lazy Lock
To make Font Lock mode faster for large buffers, you can use Lazy Lock
mode to reduce the amount of text that is fontified. In Lazy Lock mode,
buffer fontification is demand-driven; it happens to portions of the
buffer that are about to be displayed. And fontification of your
changes is deferred; it happens only when Emacs has been idle for a
certain short period of time.
@findex lazy-lock-mode
The command @kbd{M-x lazy-lock-mode} turns Lazy Lock mode on or off,
according to the argument (with no argument, it toggles). You can also
arrange to enable Lazy Lock mode whenever you use Font Lock mode, like
this:
@example
(setq font-lock-support-mode 'lazy-lock-mode)
@end example
@vindex lazy-lock-minimum-size
It is not worth avoiding buffer fontification for small buffers.
Therefore, the variable @code{lazy-lock-minimum-size} specifies a
minimum buffer size for demand-driven buffer fontification. Buffers
smaller than that are fontified all at once, as in plain Font Lock mode.
@vindex lazy-lock-defer-time
When you alter the buffer, Lazy Lock mode defers fontification of the
text you changed. The variable @code{lazy-lock-defer-time} specifies
how many seconds Emacs must be idle before it starts fontifying your
changes. If the value is 0, then changes are fontified immediately, as
in plain Font Lock mode.
@vindex lazy-lock-defer-on-scrolling
Lazy Lock mode normally fontifies newly visible portions of the buffer
before they are first displayed. However, if the value of
@code{lazy-lock-defer-on-scrolling} is non-@code{nil}, newly visible
text is fontified only when Emacs is idle for
@code{lazy-lock-defer-time} seconds.
@vindex lazy-lock-defer-contextually
In some modes, including C mode and Emacs Lisp mode, changes in one
line's contents can alter the context for subsequent lines, and thus
change how they ought to be fontified. Ordinarily, you must type
@kbd{M-g M-g} to refontify the subsequent lines. However, if you set
the variable @code{lazy-lock-defer-contextually} to non-@code{nil}, Lazy
Lock mode does this automatically, after @code{lazy-lock-defer-time}
seconds.
@cindex stealth fontification
When Emacs is idle for a long time, Lazy Lock fontifies additional
portions of the buffer, not yet displayed, in case you will display them
later. This is called @dfn{stealth fontification}.
@vindex lazy-lock-stealth-time
@vindex lazy-lock-stealth-lines
@vindex lazy-lock-stealth-verbose
The variable @code{lazy-lock-stealth-time} specifies how many seconds
Emacs has to be idle before stealth fontification starts. A value of
@code{nil} means no stealth fontification. The variables
@code{lazy-lock-stealth-lines} and @code{lazy-lock-stealth-verbose}
specify the granularity and verbosity of stealth fontification.
@node JIT Lock Mode
@subsection JIT Lock Mode
@findex jit-lock-mode
This Just-In-time support mode is roughly equivalent to Lazy Lock but is
generally faster and more robust. It supports stealth and deferred
contextual fontification.
Font-lock uses @code{jit-lock-mode} as default support mode, so you
don't have to do anything to activate it.
@node Fast or Lazy
@subsection Fast Lock or Lazy Lock?
Here is a simple guide to help you choose one of the Font Lock support
modes.
@itemize @bullet
@item
Fast Lock mode intervenes only during file visiting and buffer
killing (and related events); therefore buffer editing and window
scrolling are no faster or slower than in plain Font Lock mode.
@item
Fast Lock mode is slower at reading a cache file than Lazy Lock
mode is at fontifying a window; therefore Fast Lock mode is slower at
visiting a file than Lazy Lock mode.
@item
Lazy Lock mode intervenes during window scrolling to fontify text that
scrolls onto the screen; therefore, scrolling is slower than in plain
Font Lock mode.
@item
Lazy Lock mode doesn't fontify during buffer editing (it defers
fontification of changes); therefore, editing is faster than in plain
Font Lock mode.
@item
Fast Lock mode can be fooled by a file that is kept under version
control software; therefore buffer fontification may occur even when
a cache file exists for the file.
@item
Fast Lock mode only works with a buffer visiting a file; Lazy Lock
mode works with any buffer.
@item
Fast Lock mode generates cache files; Lazy Lock mode does not.
@end itemize
@vindex font-lock-support-mode
The variable @code{font-lock-support-mode} specifies which of these
support modes to use; for example, to specify that Fast Lock mode is
used for C/C++ modes, and Lazy Lock mode otherwise, set the variable
like this:
@example
(setq font-lock-support-mode
'((c-mode . fast-lock-mode) (c++-mode . fast-lock-mode)
(t . lazy-lock-mode)))
@end example
@node Highlight Changes
@section Highlight Changes Mode
......@@ -1222,70 +1087,71 @@ that uses faces (colors, typically) to indicate which parts of
the buffer were changed most recently.
@node Highlight Interactively
@section Interactive Highlighting of Arbitrary Text
@cindex highlighting, arbitrary text
@section Interactive Highlighting by Matching
@cindex highlighting by matching
@cindex interactive highlighting
Sometimes, you could need to highlight arbitrary strings in the
buffer. For example, you might wish to see all the references to a
certain variable in a program source file or highlight certain parts in
a voluminous output of some program, or make certain cliches stand out.
It is sometimes useful to highlight the strings that match a certain
regular expression. For example, you might wish to see all the
references to a certain variable in a program source file, or highlight
certain parts in a voluminous output of some program, or make certain
cliches stand out in an article.
@findex hi-lock-mode
Use the @kbd{M-x hi-lock-mode} command to turn on a minor mode that
allows you to specify regular expressions of the text to be highlighted.
@code{hi-lock-mode} works like Font Lock (@pxref{Font Lock}), except
that it lets you control what parts of text are highlighted.
@code{hi-lock-mode} provides several functions:
allows you to specify regular expressions of the text to be
highlighted. Hi-lock mode works like Font Lock (@pxref{Font Lock}),
except that it lets you specify explicitly what parts of text to
highlight. You control Hi-lock mode with these commands:
@table @kbd
@item C-x w h
@item C-x w h @var{regexp} @key{RET} @var{face} @key{RET}
@kindex C-x w i
@findex highlight-regexp
Specify the regular expression (@pxref{Regexps}) for the parts of buffer
text that are to be highlighted (@code{highlight-regexp}). It prompts
for the regular expression, then for the name of the face with which to
highlight the text that matches.
Highlight text that matches Highlight all strings that match
@var{regexp} using face @var{face} (@code{highlight-regexp}).
By using this command more than once, you can highlight various
parts of the text in different ways.
@item C-x w r
@item C-x w r @var{regexp} @key{RET}
@kindex C-x w r
@findex unhighlight-regexp
Unhighlight @var{regexp} (@code{unhighlight-regexp}). Prompts for the
regular expression, and will accept only one of the regexps inserted by
other @code{hi-lock} commands.
Unhighlight @var{regexp} (@code{unhighlight-regexp}). You must enter
one of the regular expressions currently specified for highlighting.
(You can use completion, or a menu, to enter one of them
conveniently.)
@item C-x w l
@item C-x w l @var{regexp} @key{RET} @var{face} @key{RET}
@kindex C-x w l
@findex highlight-lines-matching-regexp