Commit 0be641c0 authored by Chong Yidong's avatar Chong Yidong

* doc/emacs/glossary.texi (Glossary): Standardize on "text terminal" terminology.

All callers changed.
parent 6a00f380
2012-04-14 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
* glossary.texi (Glossary): Standardize on "text terminal"
terminology. All callers changed.
* misc.texi (emacsclient Options): Document "client frame" concept
and its effect on C-x C-c more carefully.
......
......@@ -694,8 +694,8 @@ directory-local variables; and the @code{info-finder} feature that
creates a virtual Info manual of package keywords.
@item
Károly L@H{o}rentey wrote the ``multi-terminal'' code, which allows Emacs to
run on graphical and text-only terminals simultaneously.
Károly L@H{o}rentey wrote the ``multi-terminal'' code, which allows
Emacs to run on graphical and text terminals simultaneously.
@item
Martin Lorentzon wrote @file{vc-annotate.el}, support for version
......
......@@ -372,7 +372,7 @@ the text in the region. @xref{Mark}, for a description of the region.
On most keyboards, @key{DEL} is labeled @key{Backspace}, but we
refer to it as @key{DEL} in this manual. (Do not confuse @key{DEL}
with the @key{Delete} key; we will discuss @key{Delete} momentarily.)
On some text-only terminals, Emacs may not recognize the @key{DEL} key
On some text terminals, Emacs may not recognize the @key{DEL} key
properly. @xref{DEL Does Not Delete}, if you encounter this problem.
The @key{delete} (@code{delete-forward-char}) command deletes in the
......@@ -530,7 +530,7 @@ too long to fit in the window, and Emacs displays it as two or more
@dfn{continuation}, and the long logical line is called a
@dfn{continued line}. On a graphical display, Emacs indicates line
wrapping with small bent arrows in the left and right window fringes.
On a text-only terminal, Emacs indicates line wrapping by displaying a
On a text terminal, Emacs indicates line wrapping by displaying a
@samp{\} character at the right margin.
Most commands that act on lines act on logical lines, not screen
......@@ -545,9 +545,9 @@ and up, respectively, by one screen line (@pxref{Moving Point}).
continuing them. This means that every logical line occupies a single
screen line; if it is longer than the width of the window, the rest of
the line is not displayed. On a graphical display, a truncated line
is indicated by a small straight arrow in the right fringe; on a
text-only terminal, it is indicated by a @samp{$} character in the
right margin. @xref{Line Truncation}.
is indicated by a small straight arrow in the right fringe; on a text
terminal, it is indicated by a @samp{$} character in the right margin.
@xref{Line Truncation}.
By default, continued lines are wrapped at the right window edge.
Since the wrapping may occur in the middle of a word, continued lines
......
......@@ -227,13 +227,13 @@ is determined by the variable @code{next-error-highlight}.
If the @file{*compilation*} buffer is shown in a window with a left
fringe (@pxref{Fringes}), the locus-visiting commands put an arrow in
the fringe, pointing to the current error message. If the window has
no left fringe, such as on a text-only terminal, these commands scroll
the window so that the current message is at the top of the window.
If you change the variable @code{compilation-context-lines} to an
integer value @var{n}, these commands scroll the window so that the
current error message is @var{n} lines from the top, whether or not
there is a fringe; the default value, @code{nil}, gives the behavior
described above.
no left fringe, such as on a text terminal, these commands scroll the
window so that the current message is at the top of the window. If
you change the variable @code{compilation-context-lines} to an integer
value @var{n}, these commands scroll the window so that the current
error message is @var{n} lines from the top, whether or not there is a
fringe; the default value, @code{nil}, gives the behavior described
above.
@vindex compilation-error-regexp-alist
@vindex grep-regexp-alist
......@@ -572,12 +572,12 @@ for special commands that can be used in the GUD interaction buffer.
As you debug a program, Emacs displays the relevant source files by
visiting them in Emacs buffers, with an arrow in the left fringe
indicating the current execution line. (On a text-only terminal, the
arrow appears as @samp{=>}, overlaid on the first two text columns.)
Moving point in such a buffer does not move the arrow. You are free
to edit these source files, but note that inserting or deleting lines
will throw off the arrow's positioning, as Emacs has no way to figure
out which edited source line corresponds to the line reported by the
indicating the current execution line. (On a text terminal, the arrow
appears as @samp{=>}, overlaid on the first two text columns.) Moving
point in such a buffer does not move the arrow. You are free to edit
these source files, but note that inserting or deleting lines will
throw off the arrow's positioning, as Emacs has no way to figure out
which edited source line corresponds to the line reported by the
debugger subprocess. To update this information, you typically have
to recompile and restart the program.
......@@ -936,7 +936,7 @@ already exists there, the click removes it. A @kbd{C-Mouse-1} click
enables or disables an existing breakpoint; a breakpoint that is
disabled, but not unset, is indicated by a gray dot.
On a text-only terminal, or when fringes are disabled, enabled
On a text terminal, or when fringes are disabled, enabled
breakpoints are indicated with a @samp{B} character in the left margin
of the window. Disabled breakpoints are indicated with @samp{b}.
(The margin is only displayed if a breakpoint is present.)
......@@ -1079,9 +1079,9 @@ debugger}.
@findex gdb-frames-select
On graphical displays, the selected stack frame is indicated by an
arrow in the fringe. On text-only terminals, or when fringes are
disabled, the selected stack frame is displayed in reverse contrast.
To select a stack frame, move point in its line and type @key{RET}
arrow in the fringe. On text terminals, or when fringes are disabled,
the selected stack frame is displayed in reverse contrast. To select
a stack frame, move point in its line and type @key{RET}
(@code{gdb-frames-select}), or click @kbd{Mouse-2} on it. Doing so
also updates the Locals buffer
@ifnottex
......
......@@ -849,8 +849,8 @@ emacs -ms coral -cr 'slate blue' &
You can reverse the foreground and background colors through the
@samp{-rv} option or with the X resource @samp{reverseVideo}.
The @samp{-fg}, @samp{-bg}, and @samp{-rv} options function on
text-only terminals as well as on graphical displays.
The @samp{-fg}, @samp{-bg}, and @samp{-rv} options function on text
terminals as well as on graphical displays.
@node Window Size X
@appendixsec Options for Window Size and Position
......
......@@ -62,7 +62,7 @@ starting with @key{ESC}. Thus, you can enter @kbd{M-a} by typing
C-a}. Unlike @key{Meta}, @key{ESC} is entered as a separate
character. You don't hold down @key{ESC} while typing the next
character; instead, press @key{ESC} and release it, then enter the
next character. This feature is useful on certain text-only terminals
next character. This feature is useful on certain text terminals
where the @key{Meta} key does not function reliably.
@cindex keys stolen by window manager
......
......@@ -286,8 +286,8 @@ scrolling whenever point moves off the left or right edge of the
screen. To disable automatic horizontal scrolling, set the variable
@code{auto-hscroll-mode} to @code{nil}. Note that when the automatic
horizontal scrolling is turned off, if point moves off the edge of the
screen, the cursor disappears to indicate that. (On text-only
terminals, the cursor is left at the edge instead.)
screen, the cursor disappears to indicate that. (On text terminals,
the cursor is left at the edge instead.)
@vindex hscroll-margin
The variable @code{hscroll-margin} controls how close point can get
......@@ -479,9 +479,9 @@ prompts for a regular expression, and displays only faces with names
matching that regular expression (@pxref{Regexps}).
It's possible for a given face to look different in different
frames. For instance, some text-only terminals do not support all
face attributes, particularly font, height, and width, and some
support a limited range of colors.
frames. For instance, some text terminals do not support all face
attributes, particularly font, height, and width, and some support a
limited range of colors.
@cindex background color
@cindex default face
......@@ -529,13 +529,13 @@ or an @dfn{RGB triplet}.
@samp{medium sea green}. To view a list of color names, type @kbd{M-x
list-colors-display}. To control the order in which colors are shown,
customize @code{list-colors-sort}. If you run this command on a
graphical display, it shows the full range of color names known to Emacs
(these are the standard X11 color names, defined in X's @file{rgb.txt}
file). If you run the command on a text-only terminal, it shows only a
small subset of colors that can be safely displayed on such terminals.
However, Emacs understands X11 color names even on text-only terminals;
if a face is given a color specified by an X11 color name, it is
displayed using the closest-matching terminal color.
graphical display, it shows the full range of color names known to
Emacs (these are the standard X11 color names, defined in X's
@file{rgb.txt} file). If you run the command on a text terminal, it
shows only a small subset of colors that can be safely displayed on
such terminals. However, Emacs understands X11 color names even on
text terminals; if a face is given a color specified by an X11 color
name, it is displayed using the closest-matching terminal color.
An RGB triplet is a string of the form @samp{#RRGGBB}. Each of the
R, G, and B components is a hexadecimal number specifying the
......@@ -651,8 +651,8 @@ at the top of a window just as the mode line appears at the bottom.
Most windows do not have a header line---only some special modes, such
Info mode, create one.
@item vertical-border
This face is used for the vertical divider between windows on
text-only terminals.
This face is used for the vertical divider between windows on text
terminals.
@item minibuffer-prompt
@cindex @code{minibuffer-prompt} face
@vindex minibuffer-prompt-properties
......@@ -679,9 +679,9 @@ This face determines the color of the mouse pointer.
@end table
The following faces likewise control the appearance of parts of the
Emacs frame, but only on text-only terminals, or when Emacs is built
on X with no toolkit support. (For all other cases, the appearance of
the respective frame elements is determined by system-wide settings.)
Emacs frame, but only on text terminals, or when Emacs is built on X
with no toolkit support. (For all other cases, the appearance of the
respective frame elements is determined by system-wide settings.)
@table @code
@item scroll-bar
......@@ -1453,9 +1453,9 @@ global-hl-line-mode} enables or disables the same mode globally.
Emacs can display long lines by @dfn{truncation}. This means that all
the characters that do not fit in the width of the screen or window do
not appear at all. On graphical displays, a small straight arrow in
the fringe indicates truncation at either end of the line. On
text-only terminals, this is indicated with @samp{$} signs in the
leftmost and/or rightmost columns.
the fringe indicates truncation at either end of the line. On text
terminals, this is indicated with @samp{$} signs in the leftmost
and/or rightmost columns.
@vindex truncate-lines
@findex toggle-truncate-lines
......@@ -1577,7 +1577,7 @@ of an overline above the text, including the height of the overline
itself, in pixels; the default is 2.
@findex tty-suppress-bold-inverse-default-colors
On some text-only terminals, bold face and inverse video together
result in text that is hard to read. Call the function
On some text terminals, bold face and inverse video together result
in text that is hard to read. Call the function
@code{tty-suppress-bold-inverse-default-colors} with a non-@code{nil}
argument to suppress the effect of bold-face in this case.
......@@ -511,7 +511,7 @@ Frames and Graphical Displays
* Tooltips:: Displaying information at the current mouse position.
* Mouse Avoidance:: Moving the mouse pointer out of the way.
* Non-Window Terminals:: Multiple frames on terminals that show only one.
* Text-Only Mouse:: Using the mouse in text-only terminals.
* Text-Only Mouse:: Using the mouse in text terminals.
International Character Set Support
......
......@@ -148,14 +148,14 @@ stopping the program temporarily and returning control to the parent
process (usually a shell); in most shells, you can resume Emacs after
suspending it with the shell command @command{%emacs}.
Text-only terminals usually listen for certain special characters
whose meaning is to kill or suspend the program you are running.
@b{This terminal feature is turned off while you are in Emacs.} The
meanings of @kbd{C-z} and @kbd{C-x C-c} as keys in Emacs were inspired
by the use of @kbd{C-z} and @kbd{C-c} on several operating systems as
the characters for stopping or killing a program, but that is their
only relationship with the operating system. You can customize these
keys to run any commands of your choice (@pxref{Keymaps}).
Text terminals usually listen for certain special characters whose
meaning is to kill or suspend the program you are running. @b{This
terminal feature is turned off while you are in Emacs.} The meanings
of @kbd{C-z} and @kbd{C-x C-c} as keys in Emacs were inspired by the
use of @kbd{C-z} and @kbd{C-c} on several operating systems as the
characters for stopping or killing a program, but that is their only
relationship with the operating system. You can customize these keys
to run any commands of your choice (@pxref{Keymaps}).
@ifnottex
@lowersections
......
......@@ -1853,7 +1853,7 @@ When typing a file name in the minibuffer, @kbd{C-@key{tab}}
(@code{file-cache-minibuffer-complete}) completes it using the file
name cache. If you repeat @kbd{C-@key{tab}}, that cycles through the
possible completions of what you had originally typed. (However, note
that the @kbd{C-@key{tab}} character cannot be typed on most text-only
that the @kbd{C-@key{tab}} character cannot be typed on most text
terminals.)
The file name cache does not fill up automatically. Instead, you
......
......@@ -57,9 +57,9 @@ Undo one entry in the current buffer's undo records (@code{undo}).
@kbd{C-x u})@footnote{Aside from @kbd{C-/}, the @code{undo} command is
also bound to @kbd{C-x u} because that is more straightforward for
beginners to remember: @samp{u} stands for ``undo''. It is also bound
to @kbd{C-_} because typing @kbd{C-/} on some text-only terminals
actually enters @kbd{C-_}.}. This undoes the most recent change in
the buffer, and moves point back to where it was before that change.
to @kbd{C-_} because typing @kbd{C-/} on some text terminals actually
enters @kbd{C-_}.}. This undoes the most recent change in the buffer,
and moves point back to where it was before that change.
Consecutive repetitions of @kbd{C-/} (or its aliases) undo earlier
and earlier changes in the current buffer. If all the recorded
......
......@@ -27,13 +27,12 @@ displays (@pxref{Exiting}). To close just the selected frame, type
This chapter describes Emacs features specific to graphical displays
(particularly mouse commands), and features for managing multiple
frames. On text-only terminals, many of these features are
unavailable. However, it is still possible to create multiple
``frames'' on text-only terminals; such frames are displayed one at a
time, filling the entire terminal screen (@pxref{Non-Window
Terminals}). It is also possible to use the mouse on some text-only
terminals (@pxref{Text-Only Mouse}, for doing so on GNU and Unix
systems; and
frames. On text terminals, many of these features are unavailable.
However, it is still possible to create multiple ``frames'' on text
terminals; such frames are displayed one at a time, filling the entire
terminal screen (@pxref{Non-Window Terminals}). It is also possible
to use the mouse on some text terminals (@pxref{Text-Only Mouse}, for
doing so on GNU and Unix systems; and
@iftex
@pxref{MS-DOS Mouse,,,emacs-xtra,Specialized Emacs Features},
@end iftex
......@@ -62,7 +61,7 @@ for doing so on MS-DOS).
* Tooltips:: Displaying information at the current mouse position.
* Mouse Avoidance:: Preventing the mouse pointer from obscuring text.
* Non-Window Terminals:: Multiple frames on terminals that show only one.
* Text-Only Mouse:: Using the mouse in text-only terminals.
* Text-Only Mouse:: Using the mouse in text terminals.
@end menu
@node Mouse Commands
......@@ -465,9 +464,9 @@ the ordinary, interactive frames are deleted. In this case, @kbd{C-x
The @kbd{C-x 5 1} (@code{delete-other-frames}) command deletes all
other frames on the current terminal (this terminal refers to either a
graphical display, or a text-only terminal; @pxref{Non-Window
Terminals}). If the Emacs session has frames open on other graphical
displays or text terminals, those are not deleted.
graphical display, or a text terminal; @pxref{Non-Window Terminals}).
If the Emacs session has frames open on other graphical displays or
text terminals, those are not deleted.
@vindex focus-follows-mouse
The @kbd{C-x 5 o} (@code{other-frame}) command selects the next
......@@ -953,7 +952,7 @@ the use of menu bars at startup, customize the variable
@code{menu-bar-mode}.
@kindex C-Mouse-3 @r{(when menu bar is disabled)}
Expert users often turn off the menu bar, especially on text-only
Expert users often turn off the menu bar, especially on text
terminals, where this makes one additional line available for text.
If the menu bar is off, you can still pop up a menu of its contents
with @kbd{C-Mouse-3} on a display which supports pop-up menus.
......@@ -1112,9 +1111,9 @@ raises the frame.
@node Non-Window Terminals
@section Non-Window Terminals
@cindex text-only terminal
@cindex text terminal
On a text-only terminal, Emacs can display only one Emacs frame at a
On a text terminal, Emacs can display only one Emacs frame at a
time. However, you can still create multiple Emacs frames, and switch
between them. Switching frames on these terminals is much like
switching between different window configurations.
......@@ -1139,11 +1138,11 @@ to select a frame according to its name. The name you specify appears
in the mode line when the frame is selected.
@node Text-Only Mouse
@section Using a Mouse in Text-only Terminals
@section Using a Mouse in Text Terminals
@cindex mouse support
@cindex terminal emulators, mouse support
Some text-only terminals support mouse clicks in the terminal window.
Some text terminals support mouse clicks in the terminal window.
@cindex xterm
In a terminal emulator which is compatible with @command{xterm}, you
......
......@@ -181,7 +181,7 @@ Emacs supports a number of character sets, each of which represents a
particular alphabet or script. @xref{International}.
@item Character Terminal
@xref{Glossary - Text-only Terminal}.
@xref{Glossary - Text Terminal}.
@item Click Event
A click event is the kind of input event (q.v.@:) generated when you
......@@ -1329,12 +1329,12 @@ Data consisting of written human language (as opposed to programs),
or following the stylistic conventions of human language.
@end itemize
@anchor{Glossary - Text-only Terminal}
@item Text-only Terminal
A text-only terminal is a display that is limited to displaying text in
character units. Such a terminal cannot control individual pixels it
displays. Emacs supports a subset of display features on text-only
terminals.
@anchor{Glossary - Text Terminal}
@item Text Terminal
A text terminal, or character terminal, is a display that is limited
to displaying text in character units. Such a terminal cannot control
individual pixels it displays. Emacs supports a subset of display
features on text terminals.
@item Text Properties
Text properties are annotations recorded for particular characters in
......@@ -1384,7 +1384,7 @@ displaying it. @xref{Continuation Lines,Truncation}, and
@ref{Glossary - Continuation Line}.
@item TTY
@xref{Glossary - Text-only Terminal}.
@xref{Glossary - Text Terminal}.
@item Undoing
Undoing means making your previous editing go in reverse, bringing
......
......@@ -1405,7 +1405,7 @@ signaled.) Currently, this feature is mainly useful for developers.
the shell command @samp{emacsclient @var{file}}, where @var{file} is a
file name. This connects to an Emacs server, and tells that Emacs
process to visit @var{file} in one of its existing frames---either a
graphical frame, or one in a text-only terminal (@pxref{Frames}). You
graphical frame, or one in a text terminal (@pxref{Frames}). You
can then select that frame to begin editing.
If there is no Emacs server, the @command{emacsclient} program halts
......@@ -1415,12 +1415,12 @@ Server})---then Emacs opens a frame on the terminal in which you
called @command{emacsclient}.
You can also force @command{emacsclient} to open a new frame on a
graphical display, or on a text-only terminal, using the @samp{-c} and
graphical display, or on a text terminal, using the @samp{-c} and
@samp{-t} options. @xref{emacsclient Options}.
If you are running on a single text-only terminal, you can switch
between @command{emacsclient}'s shell and the Emacs server using one
of two methods: (i) run the Emacs server and @command{emacsclient} on
If you are running on a single text terminal, you can switch between
@command{emacsclient}'s shell and the Emacs server using one of two
methods: (i) run the Emacs server and @command{emacsclient} on
different virtual terminals, and switch to the Emacs server's virtual
terminal after calling @command{emacsclient}; or (ii) call
@command{emacsclient} from within the Emacs server itself, using Shell
......@@ -1511,8 +1511,8 @@ buffer (@pxref{Buffers}). See below for the special behavior of
@kbd{C-x C-c} in a client frame.
On GNU and Unix systems, Emacs can create a graphical frame even if it
was started in a text-only terminal, provided it is able to connect to
a graphical display. On systems such as MS-Windows, it cannot create
was started in a text terminal, provided it is able to connect to a
graphical display. On systems such as MS-Windows, it cannot create
graphical frames if it was started from a text terminal
(@pxref{Windows Startup, emacsclient}). If Emacs cannot connect to a
graphical display for any reason, it instead creates a new client
......
......@@ -247,7 +247,7 @@ begins at the top of the character cell.
@cindex frames on MS-DOS
The MS-DOS terminal can only display a single frame at a time. The
Emacs frame facilities work on MS-DOS much as they do on text-only
Emacs frame facilities work on MS-DOS much as they do on text
terminals
@iftex
(@pxref{Frames,,,emacs, the Emacs Manual}).
......
......@@ -121,8 +121,8 @@ Emacs will always create a new text-mode frame in the same
created only if the server runs in a GUI session. Similarly, if you
invoke @command{emacsclient} with the @option{-t} option, Emacs will
create a GUI frame if the server runs in a GUI session, or a text-mode
frame when the session runs in text-only mode in a @dfn{Command
Prompt} window. @xref{emacsclient Options}.
frame when the session runs in text mode in a @dfn{Command Prompt}
window. @xref{emacsclient Options}.
@node Text and Binary
@section Text Files and Binary Files
......
......@@ -60,7 +60,7 @@ for each command; see @ref{Text Coding}.
@item
You can display non-@acronym{ASCII} characters encoded by the various
scripts. This works by using appropriate fonts on graphics displays
(@pxref{Defining Fontsets}), and by sending special codes to text-only
(@pxref{Defining Fontsets}), and by sending special codes to text
displays (@pxref{Terminal Coding}). If some characters are displayed
incorrectly, refer to @ref{Undisplayable Characters}, which describes
possible problems and explains how to solve them.
......@@ -210,7 +210,7 @@ What keys to type to input the character in the current input method
@item
If you are running Emacs on a graphical display, the font name and
glyph code for the character. If you are running Emacs on a text-only
glyph code for the character. If you are running Emacs on a text
terminal, the code(s) sent to the terminal.
@item
......@@ -1543,9 +1543,9 @@ examples are:
@node Undisplayable Characters
@section Undisplayable Characters
There may be a some non-@acronym{ASCII} characters that your terminal cannot
display. Most text-only terminals support just a single character
set (use the variable @code{default-terminal-coding-system}
There may be a some non-@acronym{ASCII} characters that your
terminal cannot display. Most text terminals support just a single
character set (use the variable @code{default-terminal-coding-system}
(@pxref{Terminal Coding}) to tell Emacs which one); characters which
can't be encoded in that coding system are displayed as @samp{?} by
default.
......@@ -1632,8 +1632,8 @@ If your keyboard can generate character codes 128 (decimal) and up,
representing non-@acronym{ASCII} characters, you can type those character codes
directly.
On a graphical display, you should not need to do anything special to use
these keys; they should simply work. On a text-only terminal, you
On a graphical display, you should not need to do anything special to
use these keys; they should simply work. On a text terminal, you
should use the command @code{M-x set-keyboard-coding-system} or the
variable @code{keyboard-coding-system} to specify which coding system
your keyboard uses (@pxref{Terminal Coding}). Enabling this feature
......
......@@ -8,12 +8,12 @@
@cindex frame
On a graphical display, such as on GNU/Linux using the X Window
System, Emacs occupies a ``graphical window''. On a text-only
terminal, Emacs occupies the entire terminal screen. We will use the
term @dfn{frame} to mean a graphical window or terminal screen
occupied by Emacs. Emacs behaves very similarly on both kinds of
frames. It normally starts out with just one frame, but you can
create additional frames if you wish (@pxref{Frames}).
System, Emacs occupies a ``graphical window''. On a text terminal,
Emacs occupies the entire terminal screen. We will use the term
@dfn{frame} to mean a graphical window or terminal screen occupied by
Emacs. Emacs behaves very similarly on both kinds of frames. It
normally starts out with just one frame, but you can create additional
frames if you wish (@pxref{Frames}).
Each frame consists of several distinct regions. At the top of the
frame is a @dfn{menu bar}, which allows you to access commands via a
......@@ -178,7 +178,7 @@ unselected windows, in order to make it stand out.
@end example
@noindent
On a text-only terminal, this text is followed by a series of dashes
On a text terminal, this text is followed by a series of dashes
extending to the right edge of the window. These dashes are omitted
on a graphical display.
......@@ -195,7 +195,7 @@ means no conversion whatsoever, and is usually used for files
containing non-textual data. Other characters represent various
@dfn{coding systems}---for example, @samp{1} represents ISO Latin-1.
On a text-only terminal, @var{cs} is preceded by two additional
On a text terminal, @var{cs} is preceded by two additional
characters that describe the coding systems for keyboard input and
terminal output. Furthermore, if you are using an input method,
@var{cs} is preceded by a string that identifies the input method
......@@ -228,7 +228,7 @@ However, if the default-directory for the current buffer is on a
remote machine, @samp{@@} is displayed instead (@pxref{File Names}).
@var{fr} gives the selected frame name (@pxref{Frames}). It appears
only on text-only terminals. The initial frame's name is @samp{F1}.
only on text terminals. The initial frame's name is @samp{F1}.
@var{buf} is the name of the buffer displayed in the window.
Usually, this is the same as the name of a file you are editing.
......@@ -307,13 +307,12 @@ You can then navigate the menus with the arrow keys. To activate a
selected menu item, press @key{RET}; to cancel menu navigation, press
@key{ESC}.
On a text-only terminal, you can use the menu bar by typing
@kbd{M-`} or @key{F10} (these run the command @code{tmm-menubar}).
This lets you select a menu item with the keyboard. A provisional
choice appears in the echo area. You can use the up and down arrow
keys to move through the menu to different items, and then you can
type @key{RET} to select the item. Each menu item is also designated
by a letter or digit (usually the initial of some word in the item's
name). This letter or digit is separated from the item name by
@samp{=>}. You can type the item's letter or digit to select the
item.
On a text terminal, you can use the menu bar by typing @kbd{M-`} or
@key{F10} (these run the command @code{tmm-menubar}). This lets you
select a menu item with the keyboard. A provisional choice appears in
the echo area. You can use the up and down arrow keys to move through
the menu to different items, and then you can type @key{RET} to select
the item. Each menu item is also designated by a letter or digit
(usually the initial of some word in the item's name). This letter or
digit is separated from the item name by @samp{=>}. You can type the
item's letter or digit to select the item.
......@@ -172,20 +172,19 @@ used to delete forwards. If this key deletes backward in Emacs, that
too suggests Emacs got the wrong information---but in the opposite
sense.
On a text-only terminal, if you find that @key{Backspace} prompts
for a Help command, like @kbd{Control-h}, instead of deleting a
character, it means that key is actually sending the @key{BS}
character. Emacs ought to be treating @key{BS} as @key{DEL}, but it
isn't.
On a text terminal, if you find that @key{Backspace} prompts for a
Help command, like @kbd{Control-h}, instead of deleting a character,
it means that key is actually sending the @key{BS} character. Emacs
ought to be treating @key{BS} as @key{DEL}, but it isn't.
@findex normal-erase-is-backspace-mode
In all of those cases, the immediate remedy is the same: use the
command @kbd{M-x normal-erase-is-backspace-mode}. This toggles
between the two modes that Emacs supports for handling @key{DEL}, so
if Emacs starts in the wrong mode, this should switch to the right
mode. On a text-only terminal, if you want to ask for help when
@key{BS} is treated as @key{DEL}, use @key{F1}; @kbd{C-?} may also
work, if it sends character code 127.
mode. On a text terminal, if you want to ask for help when @key{BS}
is treated as @key{DEL}, use @key{F1}; @kbd{C-?} may also work, if it
sends character code 127.
To fix the problem in every Emacs session, put one of the following
lines into your initialization file (@pxref{Init File}). For the
......@@ -327,8 +326,8 @@ not make a backup of its old contents.
@node Emergency Escape
@subsection Emergency Escape
On text-only terminals, the @dfn{emergency escape} feature suspends
Emacs immediately if you type @kbd{C-g} a second time before Emacs can
On text terminals, the @dfn{emergency escape} feature suspends Emacs
immediately if you type @kbd{C-g} a second time before Emacs can
actually respond to the first one by quitting. This is so you can
always get out of GNU Emacs no matter how badly it might be hung.
When things are working properly, Emacs recognizes and handles the
......
......@@ -36,8 +36,8 @@ has its own value of point.
At any time, one Emacs window is the @dfn{selected window}; the
buffer this window is displaying is the current buffer. On graphical
displays, the point is indicated by a solid blinking cursor in the
selected window, and by a hollow box in non-selected windows. On
text-only terminals, the cursor is drawn only in the selected window.
selected window, and by a hollow box in non-selected windows. On text
terminals, the cursor is drawn only in the selected window.
@xref{Cursor Display}.
Commands to move point affect the value of point for the selected
......
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