Commit 0e20c61f authored by Chong Yidong's avatar Chong Yidong

Consolidate credits. Copyedits.

parent ca970e12
Copyright (C) 2008 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
See the end of the file for license conditions.
Emacs.app
=========
This directory contains the files needed to build Emacs on
Nextstep-based platforms, including GNUStep and Mac OS X.
This file introduces the NeXTstep-based port of GNU Emacs, known as
Emacs.app, which runs on on many POSIX systems and possibly W32 using
the GNUstep libraries and on MacOS X systems using the Cocoa
libraries. The directory "nextstep" and its subdirectories "Cocoa"
and "GNUstep" contain files relevant to building and running on these
systems.
The Nextstep support code works on many POSIX systems (and possibly
W32) using the GNUstep libraries, and on MacOS X systems using the
Cocoa libraries.
Those primarily responsible for the port (in chronological order) were:
See the INSTALL file in this directory for compilaton instructions.
Michael Brouwer
Carl Edman
Christian Limpach
Scott Bender
Christophe de Dinechin
Adrian Robert
Those primarily responsible for the port were, in chronological order:
Michael Brouwer, Carl Edman, Christian Limpach, Scott Bender,
Christophe de Dinechin, and Adrian Robert.
Peter Dyballa assisted in a variety of ways to improve text rendering
and keyboard handling, Adam Ratcliffe documented the Preferences
panel, David M. Cooke contributed fixes to XPM handling, and Carsten
Bormann helped get dired working for non-ASCII filenames. People who
provided additional assistance include Adam Fedor, Fred Kiefer, M. Uli
Klusterer, Alexander Malmberg, Jonas Matton, and Riccardo Mottola.
See AUTHORS file and "Release History" below for more information.
GNU Emacs is due to Richard Stallman and company.
The GNUstep port was made possible through the assistance of Adam Fedor, Fred
Kiefer, M. Uli Klusterer, Alexander Malmberg, Jonas Matton, and Riccardo
Mottola.
Peter Dyballa assisted in a variety of ways to improve text rendering and
keyboard handling. Adam Ratcliffe documented the Preferences panel. David
M. Cooke contributed fixes to XPM handling. Carsten Bormann helped get dired
working for non-ASCII filenames.
Requirements
------------
MacOS X 10.3 or later
- or -
GNUstep "Startup 0.13" or later
Tested on linux, should work on other systems, perhaps with minor build
tweaking.
Compilation
-----------
See INSTALL.
- or -
Usage
-----
Please use the first entry under the help menu within Emacs.app, do
"M-x info-ns-emacs".
GNUstep "Startup 0.13" or later
Tested on GNU/Linux, should work on other systems, perhaps with minor
build tweaking.
Background
----------
Internally to emacs, the port and its code are referred to using the term
"NeXTstep", despite the fact that no system or API has been released under
this name in more than 10 years. Here's some background on why..
NeXT, Inc. introduced the NeXTstep API with its computer and operating system
in the late 1980's. Later on in collaboration with Sun, this API was
published as a specification called OpenStep. The GNUstep project started in
the early 1990's to provide a free implementation of this API. Later on,
Apple bought NeXT (some would say "NeXT bought Apple") and made OpenStep the
basis of OS X, calling the API "Cocoa". Since then, Cocoa has evolved beyond
the OpenStep specification, and GNUstep has followed it.
Thus, calling this port "OpenStep" is not technically accurate, and in the
absence of any other determinant, we are using the term "NeXTstep", both
because it signifies the original inspiration that created these APIs, and
because all of the classes and functions still begin with the letters "NS".
Within Emacs, the port and its code are referred to using the term
"Nextstep", despite the fact that no system or API has been released
under this name in more than 10 years. Here's some background on why:
NeXT, Inc. introduced the NeXTstep API with its computer and operating
system in the late 1980's. Later on, in collaboration with Sun, this
API was published as a specification called OpenStep. The GNUstep
project started in the early 1990's to provide a free implementation
of this API. Later on, Apple bought NeXT (some would say "NeXT bought
Apple") and made OpenStep the basis of OS X, calling the API "Cocoa".
Since then, Cocoa has evolved beyond the OpenStep specification, and
GNUstep has followed it.
Thus, calling this port "OpenStep" is not technically accurate, and in
the absence of any other determinant, we are using the term
"Nextstep", both because it signifies the original inspiration that
created these APIs, and because all of the classes and functions still
begin with the letters "NS".
(See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nextstep)
This Emacs port was first released in the early 1990's on the NeXT computer,
and was successively updated to OpenStep, Rhapsody, OS X, and then finally
GNUstep, tracking GNU emacs core releases in the meantime.
This Emacs port was first released in the early 1990's on the NeXT
computer, and was successively updated to OpenStep, Rhapsody, OS X,
and then finally GNUstep, tracking GNU emacs core releases in the
meantime.
Release History
......
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