Commit 112d1241 authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris

Check calendar.texi

* doc/emacs/calendar.texi: Misc small changes, including updating the
dates of examples.

* admin/FOR-RELEASE: Related markup.
parent 4230351b
......@@ -126,7 +126,7 @@ arevert-xtra.texi cyd
basic.texi cyd
buffers.texi cyd
building.texi cyd
calendar.texi
calendar.texi rgm
cal-xtra.texi
cmdargs.texi cyd
commands.texi cyd
......
2012-02-17 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* calendar.texi: Misc small changes, including updating the dates
of examples.
2012-02-16 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* calendar.texi: Misc small changes.
......
......@@ -910,6 +910,7 @@ years for the date given by point. If you are not in the calendar,
this command first asks you for the date of death and the range of
years, and then displays the list of yahrzeit dates.
@c FIXME move to emacs-xtra.
@node Mayan Calendar
@subsection Converting from the Mayan Calendar
......@@ -972,7 +973,7 @@ to go to the next occurrence of a tzolkin date.
@findex calendar-mayan-next-haab-date
@cindex Mayan haab calendar
The Mayan haab calendar is a cycle of 365 days arranged as 18 months
of 20 days each, followed a 5-day monthless period. Like the tzolkin
of 20 days each, followed by a 5-day monthless period. Like the tzolkin
cycle, this cycle repeats endlessly, and there are commands to move
backward and forward to the previous or next point in the cycle. Type
@kbd{g m p h} to go to the previous haab date; Emacs asks you for a haab
......@@ -1012,7 +1013,7 @@ date.
showing what that file looks like:
@example
12/22/1988 Twentieth wedding anniversary!!
12/22/2012 Twentieth wedding anniversary!!
&1/1. Happy New Year!
10/22 Ruth's birthday.
* 21, *: Payday
......@@ -1021,15 +1022,15 @@ Tuesday--weekly meeting with grad students at 10am
1/13/89 Friday the thirteenth!!
&thu 4pm squash game with Lloyd.
mar 16 Dad's birthday
April 15, 1989 Income tax due.
April 15, 2013 Income tax due.
&* 15 time cards due.
@end example
@noindent
This format is essentially the same as the one used by the system's
@command{calendar} utility. This example uses extra spaces to align
the event descriptions of most of the entries. Such formatting is
purely a matter of taste.
This format is essentially the same as the one used by the separate
@command{calendar} utility that is present on some Unix systems. This
example uses extra spaces to align the event descriptions of most of
the entries. Such formatting is purely a matter of taste.
Although you probably will start by creating a diary manually, Emacs
provides a number of commands to let you view, add, and change diary
......@@ -1108,8 +1109,8 @@ a different face.
@xref{Calendar Customizing, diary-entry-marker}.
@end ifnottex
The command applies both to the currently visible months and to
other months that subsequently become visible by scrolling. To turn
This command applies both to the months that are currently visible
and to those that subsequently become visible after scrolling. To turn
marking off and erase the current marks, type @kbd{u}, which also
turns off holiday marks (@pxref{Holidays}). If the variable
@code{calendar-mark-diary-entries-flag} is non-@code{nil}, creating or
......@@ -1133,13 +1134,13 @@ how many days to include.
@end ifnottex
If you put @code{(diary)} in your @file{.emacs} file, this
automatically displays a window with the day's diary entries, when you
enter Emacs.
automatically displays a window with the day's diary entries when you
start Emacs.
@findex diary-mail-entries
@vindex diary-mail-days
Many users like to receive notice of events in their diary as email.
To send such mail to yourself, use the command @kbd{M-x
Some people like to receive email notifications of events in their
diary. To send such mail to yourself, use the command @kbd{M-x
diary-mail-entries}. A prefix argument specifies how many days
(starting with today) to check; otherwise, the variable
@code{diary-mail-days} says how many days.
......@@ -1170,7 +1171,7 @@ consists only of the date or day name (with no following blanks or
punctuation). For example:
@example
02/11/1989
02/11/2012
Bill B. visits Princeton today
2pm Cognitive Studies Committee meeting
2:30-5:30 Liz at Lawrenceville
......@@ -1195,10 +1196,11 @@ for more than one day's entries.
@vindex diary-nonmarking-symbol
You can inhibit the marking of certain diary entries in the calendar
window; to do this, insert an ampersand @code{diary-nonmarking-symbol}
(default @samp{&}) at the beginning of the entry, before the date. This
has no effect on display of the entry in the diary window; it affects
only marks on dates in the calendar window. Nonmarking entries are
window; to do this, insert the string that
@code{diary-nonmarking-symbol} specifies (default @samp{&}) at the
beginning of the entry, before the date. This
has no effect on display of the entry in the diary window; it only
affects marks on dates in the calendar window. Nonmarking entries are
especially useful for generic entries that would otherwise mark many
different dates.
......@@ -1211,14 +1213,14 @@ formatting a date. The examples all show dates in American order
month, year) and ISO order (year, month, day) as options.
@example
4/20/93 Switch-over to new tabulation system
4/20/12 Switch-over to new tabulation system
apr. 25 Start tabulating annual results
4/30 Results for April are due
*/25 Monthly cycle finishes
Friday Don't leave without backing up files
@end example
The first entry appears only once, on April 20, 1993. The second and
The first entry appears only once, on April 20, 2012. The second and
third appear every year on the specified dates, and the fourth uses a
wildcard (asterisk) for the month, so it appears on the 25th of every
month. The final entry appears every week on Friday.
......@@ -1228,7 +1230,7 @@ month. The final entry appears every week on Friday.
This must be followed by a nondigit. In the date itself, @var{month}
and @var{day} are numbers of one or two digits. The optional @var{year}
is also a number, and may be abbreviated to the last two digits; that
is, you can use @samp{11/12/1989} or @samp{11/12/89}.
is, you can use @samp{11/12/2012} or @samp{11/12/12}.
Dates can also have the form @samp{@var{monthname} @var{day}} or
@samp{@var{monthname} @var{day}, @var{year}}, where the month's name can
......@@ -1242,7 +1244,7 @@ letters of a name as its abbreviation. Case is not significant.
A date may be @dfn{generic}; that is, partially unspecified. Then the
entry applies to all dates that match the specification. If the date
does not contain a year, it is generic and applies to any year.
Alternatively, @var{month}, @var{day}, or @var{year} can be a @samp{*};
Alternatively, @var{month}, @var{day}, or @var{year} can be @samp{*};
this matches any month, day, or year, respectively. Thus, a diary entry
@samp{3/*/*} matches any day in March of any year; so does @samp{march
*}.
......@@ -1308,7 +1310,7 @@ command, and type the rest of the entry. Similarly, you can insert a
yearly diary entry with the @kbd{i y} command.
All of the above commands make marking diary entries by default. To
make a nonmarking diary entry, give a numeric argument to the command.
make a nonmarking diary entry, give a prefix argument to the command.
For example, @kbd{C-u i w} makes a nonmarking weekly diary entry.
When you modify the diary file, be sure to save the file before
......@@ -1365,15 +1367,15 @@ diary functions can use it to calculate the number of elapsed years.
A @dfn{block} diary entry applies to a specified range of consecutive
dates. Here is a block diary entry that applies to all dates from June
24, 1990 through July 10, 1990:
24, 2012 through July 10, 2012:
@findex diary-block
@example
%%(diary-block 6 24 1990 7 10 1990) Vacation
%%(diary-block 6 24 2012 7 10 2012) Vacation
@end example
@noindent
The @samp{6 24 1990} indicates the starting date and the @samp{7 10 1990}
The @samp{6 24 2012} indicates the starting date and the @samp{7 10 2012}
indicates the stopping date. (Again, if you are using the European or ISO
calendar style, the input order of month, day and year is different.)
......@@ -1393,23 +1395,23 @@ which looks like this:
@findex diary-cyclic
@example
%%(diary-cyclic 50 3 1 1990) Renew medication
%%(diary-cyclic 50 3 1 2012) Renew medication
@end example
@noindent
This entry applies to March 1, 1990 and every 50th day following;
@samp{3 1 1990} specifies the starting date. (If you are using the
This entry applies to March 1, 2012 and every 50th day following;
@samp{3 1 2012} specifies the starting date. (If you are using the
European or ISO calendar style, the input order of month, day and year
is different.)
All three of these commands make marking diary entries. To insert a
nonmarking entry, give a numeric argument to the command. For example,
nonmarking entry, give a prefix argument to the command. For example,
@kbd{C-u i a} makes a nonmarking anniversary diary entry.
Marking sexp diary entries in the calendar is @emph{extremely}
time-consuming, since every date visible in the calendar window must be
individually checked. So it's a good idea to make sexp diary entries
nonmarking (with @samp{&}) when possible.
Marking sexp diary entries in the calendar can be time-consuming,
since every date visible in the calendar window must be individually
checked. So it's a good idea to make sexp diary entries nonmarking
(with @samp{&}) when possible.
Another sophisticated kind of sexp entry, a @dfn{floating} diary entry,
specifies a regularly occurring event by offsets specified in days,
......@@ -1451,8 +1453,8 @@ can perform arbitrary computations to determine when they apply.
@vindex appt-audible
@vindex appt-display-mode-line
If you have a diary entry for an appointment, and that diary entry
begins with a recognizable time of day, Emacs can warn you several
minutes beforehand that that appointment is pending. Emacs alerts you
begins with a recognizable time of day, Emacs can warn you in advance
that an appointment is pending. Emacs alerts you
to the appointment by displaying a message in your chosen format, as
specified by the variable @code{appt-display-format}. If the value of
@code{appt-audible} is non-@code{nil}, the warning includes an audible
......@@ -1539,6 +1541,7 @@ diary-from-outlook} to import the entry. You can make this command
recognize additional appointment message formats by customizing the
variable @code{diary-outlook-formats}.
@c FIXME the name of the RFC is hardly very relevant.
@cindex iCalendar support
The icalendar package allows you to transfer data between your Emacs
diary file and iCalendar files, which are defined in ``RFC
......@@ -1553,7 +1556,7 @@ diary file and iCalendar files, which are defined in ``RFC
@findex icalendar-import-buffer
The command @code{icalendar-import-buffer} extracts
iCalendar data from the current buffer and adds it to your (default)
iCalendar data from the current buffer and adds it to your
diary file. This function is also suitable for automatic extraction of
iCalendar data; for example with the Rmail mail client one could use:
......@@ -1585,7 +1588,7 @@ to the main diary file, if these are different files.
Use @code{icalendar-export-file} to interactively export an entire
Emacs diary file to iCalendar format. To export only a part of a diary
file, mark the relevant area, and call @code{icalendar-export-region}.
In both cases the result is appended to the target file.
In both cases, Emacs appends the result to the target file.
@node Daylight Saving
@section Daylight Saving Time
......@@ -1691,7 +1694,7 @@ workday in the mode line, either customize the
@vindex timeclock-ask-before-exiting
Terminating the current Emacs session might or might not mean that
you have stopped working on the project and, by default, Emacs asks
you. You can, however, set customize the value of the variable
you. You can, however, customize the value of the variable
@code{timeclock-ask-before-exiting} to @code{nil} to avoid the question;
then, only an explicit @kbd{M-x timeclock-out} or @kbd{M-x
timeclock-change} will tell Emacs that the current interval is over.
......
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