Commit 12de6e26 authored by Eli Zaretskii's avatar Eli Zaretskii
Browse files

Proofreading fixes from Chris Green <chris_e_green@yahoo.com>

and "J. Otto Tennant" <jot@visi.com>.
parent b2c8319e
......@@ -217,13 +217,13 @@ characters.
you used @samp{--unibyte}. This includes the Emacs initialization
file, @file{.emacs}, and the initialization files of Emacs packages
such as Gnus. However, you can specify unibyte loading for a
particular Lisp file, by putting @samp{-*-unibyte: t;-*-} in a comment
on the first line. Then that file is always loaded as unibyte text,
even if you did not start Emacs with @samp{--unibyte}. The motivation
for these conventions is that it is more reliable to always load any
particular Lisp file in the same way. However, you can load a Lisp
file as unibyte, on any one occasion, by typing @kbd{C-x @key{RET} c
raw-text @key{RET}} immediately before loading it.
particular Lisp file, by putting @w{@samp{-*-unibyte: t;-*-}} in a
comment on the first line. Then that file is always loaded as unibyte
text, even if you did not start Emacs with @samp{--unibyte}. The
motivation for these conventions is that it is more reliable to always
load any particular Lisp file in the same way. However, you can load
a Lisp file as unibyte, on any one occasion, by typing @kbd{C-x
@key{RET} c raw-text @key{RET}} immediately before loading it.
The mode line indicates whether multibyte character support is enabled
in the current buffer. If it is, there are two or more characters (most
......@@ -302,7 +302,7 @@ preferred coding system as needed for the locale.
If you modify the @env{LC_ALL}, @env{LC_CTYPE}, or @env{LANG}
environment variables while running Emacs, you may want to invoke the
@code{set-locale-environment} function afterwards to readjust the
@code{set-locale-environment} function afterwards to re-adjust the
language environment from the new locale.
@vindex locale-preferred-coding-systems
......@@ -363,7 +363,7 @@ characters can share one input method. A few languages support several
input methods.
The simplest kind of input method works by mapping ASCII letters
into another alphabet; this allows you to type characters which your
into another alphabet; this allows you to type characters that your
keyboard doesn't support directly. This is how the Greek and Russian
input methods work.
......@@ -405,7 +405,7 @@ characters. For example, in input method @code{latin-1-postfix}, the
sequence @kbd{e '} combines to form an @samp{e} with an accent. What if
you want to enter them as separate characters?
One way is to type the accent twice; that is a special feature for
One way is to type the accent twice; this is a special feature for
entering the separate letter and accent. For example, @kbd{e ' '} gives
you the two characters @samp{e'}. Another way is to type another letter
after the @kbd{e}---something that won't combine with that---and
......@@ -470,7 +470,7 @@ Display a list of all the supported input methods.
@kindex C-x RET C-\
To choose an input method for the current buffer, use @kbd{C-x
@key{RET} C-\} (@code{set-input-method}). This command reads the
input method name with the minibuffer; the name normally starts with the
input method name from the minibuffer; the name normally starts with the
language environment that it is meant to be used with. The variable
@code{current-input-method} records which input method is selected.
......@@ -606,7 +606,7 @@ Display a list of all the supported coding systems.
@findex describe-coding-system
The command @kbd{C-h C} (@code{describe-coding-system}) displays
information about particular coding systems. You can specify a coding
system name as argument; alternatively, with an empty argument, it
system name as the argument; alternatively, with an empty argument, it
describes the coding systems currently selected for various purposes,
both in the current buffer and as the defaults, and the priority list
for recognizing coding systems (@pxref{Recognize Coding}).
......@@ -718,9 +718,9 @@ several times, each use adds one element to the front of the priority
list.
If you use a coding system that specifies the end-of-line conversion
type, such as @code{iso-8859-1-dos}, what that means is that Emacs
type, such as @code{iso-8859-1-dos}, what this means is that Emacs
should attempt to recognize @code{iso-8859-1} with priority, and should
use DOS end-of-line conversion in case it recognizes @code{iso-8859-1}.
use DOS end-of-line conversion if it recognizes @code{iso-8859-1}.
@vindex file-coding-system-alist
Sometimes a file name indicates which coding system to use for the
......@@ -770,21 +770,22 @@ the buffer.
The default value of @code{inhibit-iso-escape-detection} is
@code{nil}. We recommend that you not change it permanently, only for
one specific operation. That's because many Emacs Lisp source files
that contain non-ASCII characters are encoded in the coding system
@code{iso-2022-7bit} in the Emacs distribution, and they won't be
in the Emacs distribution contain non-ASCII characters encoded in the
coding system @code{iso-2022-7bit}, and they won't be
decoded correctly when you visit those files if you suppress the
escape sequence detection.
@vindex coding
You can specify the coding system for a particular file using the
@samp{-*-@dots{}-*-} construct at the beginning of a file, or a local
variables list at the end (@pxref{File Variables}). You do this by
defining a value for the ``variable'' named @code{coding}. Emacs does
not really have a variable @code{coding}; instead of setting a variable,
it uses the specified coding system for the file. For example,
@samp{-*-mode: C; coding: latin-1;-*-} specifies use of the Latin-1
coding system, as well as C mode. If you specify the coding explicitly
in the file, that overrides @code{file-coding-system-alist}.
@w{@samp{-*-@dots{}-*-}} construct at the beginning of a file, or a
local variables list at the end (@pxref{File Variables}). You do this
by defining a value for the ``variable'' named @code{coding}. Emacs
does not really have a variable @code{coding}; instead of setting a
variable, it uses the specified coding system for the file. For
example, @samp{-*-mode: C; coding: latin-1;-*-} specifies use of the
Latin-1 coding system, as well as C mode. If you specify the coding
explicitly in the file, that overrides
@code{file-coding-system-alist}.
@vindex auto-coding-alist
@vindex auto-coding-regexp-alist
......@@ -819,14 +820,15 @@ Coding}).
You can insert any possible character into any Emacs buffer, but
most coding systems can only handle some of the possible characters.
This means that you can insert characters that cannot be encoded with
the coding system that will be used to save the buffer. For example,
you could start with an ASCII file and insert a few Latin-1 characters
into it, or you could edit a text file in Polish encoded in
@code{iso-8859-2} and add to it translations of several Polish words
into Russian. When you save the buffer, Emacs cannot use the current
value of @code{buffer-file-coding-system}, because the characters you
added cannot be encoded by that coding system.
This means that it is possible for you to insert characters that
cannot be encoded with the coding system that will be used to save the
buffer. For example, you could start with an ASCII file and insert a
few Latin-1 characters into it, or you could edit a text file in
Polish encoded in @code{iso-8859-2} and add to it translations of
several Polish words into Russian. When you save the buffer, Emacs
cannot use the current value of @code{buffer-file-coding-system},
because the characters you added cannot be encoded by that coding
system.
When that happens, Emacs tries the most-preferred coding system (set
by @kbd{M-x prefer-coding-system} or @kbd{M-x
......@@ -859,7 +861,7 @@ Emacs encodes outgoing mail using the Latin-1 coding system.
@vindex rmail-decode-mime-charset
When you get new mail in Rmail, each message is translated
automatically from the coding system it is written in---as if it were a
automatically from the coding system it is written in, as if it were a
separate file. This uses the priority list of coding systems that you
have specified. If a MIME message specifies a character set, Rmail
obeys that specification, unless @code{rmail-decode-mime-charset} is
......@@ -1041,14 +1043,14 @@ messages and @code{format-time-string} formats and time stamps. You
should choose a coding system that is compatible with the underlying
system's text representation, which is normally specified by one of
the environment variables @env{LC_ALL}, @env{LC_CTYPE}, and
@env{LANG}. (The first one whose value is nonempty is the one that
determines the text representation.)
@env{LANG}. (The first one, in the order specified above, whose value
is nonempty is the one that determines the text representation.)
@node Fontsets
@section Fontsets
@cindex fontsets
A font for X typically defines shapes for one alphabet or script.
A font for X typically defines shapes for a single alphabet or script.
Therefore, displaying the entire range of scripts that Emacs supports
requires a collection of many fonts. In Emacs, such a collection is
called a @dfn{fontset}. A fontset is defined by a list of fonts, each
......@@ -1068,7 +1070,7 @@ additional font support.}
and the @dfn{startup fontset}. The standard fontset is most likely to
have fonts for a wide variety of non-ASCII characters; however, this is
not the default for Emacs to use. (By default, Emacs tries to find a
font which has bold and italic variants.) You can specify use of the
font that has bold and italic variants.) You can specify use of the
standard fontset with the @samp{-fn} option, or with the @samp{Font} X
resource (@pxref{Font X}). For example,
......@@ -1136,7 +1138,7 @@ window frame:
With the X resource @samp{Emacs.Font}, you can specify a fontset name
just like an actual font name. But be careful not to specify a fontset
name in a wildcard resource like @samp{Emacs*Font}---that wildcard
specification applies to various other purposes, such as menus, and
specification is used for various other purposes, such as menus, and
menus cannot handle fontsets.
You can specify additional fontsets using X resources named
......@@ -1171,7 +1173,8 @@ that describe the character set. For the ASCII character font,
collapses them into a single wildcard. This is to prevent use of
auto-scaled fonts. Fonts made by scaling larger fonts are not usable
for editing, and scaling a smaller font is not useful because it is
better to use the smaller font in its own size, which Emacs does.
better to use the smaller font in its own size, which is what Emacs
does.
Thus if @var{fontpattern} is this,
......@@ -1250,13 +1253,13 @@ sequences mostly correspond to those of the prefix input methods.
@cindex ISO Latin character sets
@cindex Unibyte operation
The ISO 8859 Latin-@var{n} character sets define character codes in
the range 160 to 255 to handle the accented letters and punctuation
needed by various European languages (and some non-European ones).
If you disable multibyte
characters, Emacs can still handle @emph{one} of these character codes
at a time. To specify @emph{which} of these codes to use, invoke
@kbd{M-x set-language-environment} and specify a suitable language
environment such as @samp{Latin-@var{n}}.
the range 0240 to 0377 octal (160 to 255 decimal) to handle the
accented letters and punctuation needed by various European languages
(and some non-European ones). If you disable multibyte characters,
Emacs can still handle @emph{one} of these character codes at a time.
To specify @emph{which} of these codes to use, invoke @kbd{M-x
set-language-environment} and specify a suitable language environment
such as @samp{Latin-@var{n}}.
For more information about unibyte operation, see @ref{Enabling
Multibyte}. Note particularly that you probably want to ensure that
......@@ -1282,7 +1285,7 @@ them yet.
@findex standard-display-8bit
@cindex 8-bit display
Normally non-ISO-8859 characters (between characters 128 and 159
Normally non-ISO-8859 characters (decimal codes between 128 and 159
inclusive) are displayed as octal escapes. You can change this for
non-standard ``extended'' versions of ISO-8859 character sets by using the
function @code{standard-display-8bit} in the @code{disp-table} library.
......@@ -1293,8 +1296,9 @@ characters:
@itemize @bullet
@cindex 8-bit input
@item
If your keyboard can generate character codes 128 and up, representing
non-ASCII characters, you can type those character codes directly.
If your keyboard can generate character codes 128 (decimal) and up,
representing non-ASCII characters, you can type those character codes
directly.
On a windowing terminal, you should not need to do anything special to
use these keys; they should simply work. On a text-only terminal, you
......
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