Commit 144e981a authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

Minor clarifications.

Refer to "graphical" terminals, rather than window systems.
parent 4d662563
......@@ -84,8 +84,7 @@ Delete next character (@code{delete-char}). If your keyboard has a
binds it to @code{delete-char} as well.
@item @key{DEL}
@itemx @key{BS}
Delete previous character (@code{delete-backward-char}). Some keyboards
refer to this key as a ``backspace key'' and label it with a left arrow.
Delete previous character (@code{delete-backward-char}).
@item M-\
Delete spaces and tabs around point (@code{delete-horizontal-space}).
@item M-@key{SPC}
......@@ -112,11 +111,12 @@ kill instead, since they can erase more than one character this way.
@kindex BACKSPACE
@kindex BS
@kindex DELETE
Every keyboard has a large key, labeled @key{DEL}, @key{BACKSPACE},
@key{BS} or @key{DELETE}, which is a short distance above the
Every keyboard has a large key which is a short distance above the
@key{RET} or @key{ENTER} key and is normally used for erasing what you
have typed. Regardless of the actual name on the key, in Emacs it is
equivalent to @key{DEL}---or it should be.
have typed. It may be labeled @key{DEL}, @key{BACKSPACE}, @key{BS},
@key{DELETE}, or even with a left arrow. Regardless of the label on
the key, in Emacs it called @key{DEL}, and it should delete one
character backwards.
Many keyboards (including standard PC keyboards) have a
@key{BACKSPACE} key a short ways above @key{RET} or @key{ENTER}, and a
......@@ -251,22 +251,23 @@ and @kbd{M-d} (@pxref{Words}); balanced expressions, with @kbd{C-M-k}
@kbd{M-k} (@pxref{Sentences}).@refill
@node Graphical Kill
@subsection Killing on Graphical Terminals
@subsection Killing on Graphical Displays
On multi-window terminals, the most recent kill done in Emacs is
also the primary selection, if it is more recent than any selection
you made in another program. This means that the paste commands of
other applications with separate windows copy the text that you killed
in Emacs. In addition, Emacs yank commands treat other applications'
selections as part of the kill ring, so you can yank them into Emacs.
On graphical displays with window systems, the most recent kill done
in Emacs is also the primary selection, if it is more recent than any
selection you made in another program. This means that the paste
commands of other window-based applications copy the text that you
killed in Emacs. In addition, Emacs yank commands treat other
applications' selections as part of the kill ring, so you can yank
them into Emacs.
@cindex Delete Selection mode
@cindex mode, Delete Selection
@findex delete-selection-mode
Many window systems follow the convention that insertion while text
is selected deletes the selected text. You can make Emacs behave this
way by enabling Delete Selection mode, with @kbd{M-x
delete-selection-mode}, or using Custom. Another effect of this mode
way by enabling Delete Selection mode---with @kbd{M-x
delete-selection-mode} or using Custom. Another effect of this mode
is that @key{DEL}, @kbd{C-d} and some other keys, when a selection
exists, will kill the whole selection. It also enables Transient Mark
mode (@pxref{Transient Mark}).
......@@ -297,10 +298,10 @@ Save region as last killed text without actually killing it
Append next kill to last batch of killed text (@code{append-next-kill}).
@end table
On window systems, if there is a current selection in some other
application, and you selected it more recently than you killed any
text in Emacs, @kbd{C-y} copies the selection instead of text
killed within Emacs.
On graphical displays with window systems, if there is a current
selection in some other application, and you selected it more recently
than you killed any text in Emacs, @kbd{C-y} copies the selection
instead of text killed within Emacs.
@menu
* Kill Ring:: Where killed text is stored. Basic yanking.
......@@ -601,7 +602,8 @@ move left into the gap.
rectangle is not stored in the kill ring, but in a special place that
can only record the most recent rectangle killed. This is because yanking
a rectangle is so different from yanking linear text that different yank
commands have to be used and yank-popping is hard to make sense of.
commands have to be used. It is hard to define yank-popping for rectangles,
so we do not try.
@kindex C-x r y
@findex yank-rectangle
......@@ -665,7 +667,7 @@ applications. @kbd{C-x} means cut (kill), @kbd{C-c} copy, @kbd{C-v}
paste (yank), and @kbd{C-z} undo. Standard Emacs commands like
@kbd{C-x C-c} still work, because @kbd{C-x} and @kbd{C-c} only take
effect when the mark is active (and the region is highlighted).
However, if you don't want these bindings at all, set
However, if you don't want to override these bindings Emacs at all, set
@code{cua-enable-cua-keys} to @code{nil}.
In CUA mode, using @kbd{Shift} together with the movement keys
......@@ -674,10 +676,10 @@ standard (unshifted) movement keys deactivate the mark, and typed text
replaces the active region as in Delete-Selection mode
(@pxref{Graphical Kill}).
To run a command like @kbd{C-x C-f} while the mark is active, use
one of the following methods: either hold @kbd{Shift} together with
the prefix key, e.g. @kbd{S-C-x C-f}, or quickly type the prefix key
twice, e.g. @kbd{C-x C-x C-f}.
To enter an Emacs command like @kbd{C-x C-f} while the mark is
active, use one of the following methods: either hold @kbd{Shift}
together with the prefix key, e.g. @kbd{S-C-x C-f}, or quickly type
the prefix key twice, e.g. @kbd{C-x C-x C-f}.
@cindex rectangle highlighting
CUA mode provides enhanced rectangle support with visible
......
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