Commit 16152b76 authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris
Browse files

Use Texinfo recommended convention for quotes+punctuation.

parent 84412f2c
2012-04-26 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* ack.texi, basic.texi, buffers.texi, building.texi:
* calendar.texi, cmdargs.texi, commands.texi, custom.texi:
* dired.texi, display.texi, emerge-xtra.texi, files.texi:
* fortran-xtra.texi, help.texi, kmacro.texi, mini.texi, misc.texi:
* msdog-xtra.texi, picture-xtra.texi, programs.texi, rmail.texi:
* search.texi, trouble.texi, windows.texi:
Use Texinfo recommended convention for quotes+punctuation.
2012-04-25 Eli Zaretskii <eliz@gnu.org>
* mule.texi (Bidirectional Editing): Improve indexing. Minor
......
......@@ -240,7 +240,7 @@ for compiled Emacs Lisp code.
@item
Mathias Dahl wrote @file{image-dired.el}, a package for viewing image
files as ``thumbnails.''
files as ``thumbnails''.
@item
Julien Danjou wrote an implementation of ``Desktop Notifications''
......@@ -1031,7 +1031,7 @@ Together with Dmitry Dzhus, he wrote @file{gdb-mi.el}, the successor to
@item
Danny Roozendaal implemented @file{handwrite.el}, which converts text
into ``handwriting.''
into ``handwriting''.
@item
Markus Rost wrote @file{cus-test.el}, a testing framework for customize.
......@@ -1228,7 +1228,7 @@ the keyboard.
@item
Jean-Philippe Theberge wrote @file{thumbs.el}, a package for viewing
image files as ``thumbnails.''
image files as ``thumbnails''.
@item
Spencer Thomas wrote the original @file{dabbrev.el}, providing a command
......
......@@ -668,7 +668,7 @@ those two positions are the accessible ones. @xref{Narrowing}.
@cindex arguments to commands
In the terminology of mathematics and computing, @dfn{argument}
means ``data provided to a function or operation.'' You can give any
means ``data provided to a function or operation''. You can give any
Emacs command a @dfn{numeric argument} (also called a @dfn{prefix
argument}). Some commands interpret the argument as a repetition
count. For example, giving @kbd{C-f} an argument of ten causes it to
......@@ -762,7 +762,7 @@ described when they come up; they exist to make an individual command
more convenient, and they are documented in that command's
documentation string.
We use the term ``prefix argument'' as well as ``numeric argument,''
We use the term ``prefix argument'' as well as ``numeric argument'',
to emphasize that you type these argument before the command, and to
distinguish them from minibuffer arguments that come after the
command.
......
......@@ -180,7 +180,7 @@ buffers that were current most recently come first.
@samp{.} in the first field of a line indicates that the buffer is
current. @samp{%} indicates a read-only buffer. @samp{*} indicates
that the buffer is ``modified.'' If several buffers are modified, it
that the buffer is ``modified''. If several buffers are modified, it
may be time to save some with @kbd{C-x s} (@pxref{Save Commands}).
Here is an example of a buffer list:
......@@ -392,7 +392,7 @@ line:
@table @kbd
@item ~
Mark the buffer ``unmodified.'' The command @kbd{~} does this
Mark the buffer ``unmodified''. The command @kbd{~} does this
immediately when you type it.
@item %
Toggle the buffer's read-only flag. The command @kbd{%} does
......@@ -590,7 +590,7 @@ rule or another is easier for you to remember and apply quickly.
Iswitchb global minor mode provides convenient switching between
buffers using substrings of their names. It replaces the normal
definitions of @kbd{C-x b}, @kbd{C-x 4 b}, @kbd{C-x 5 b}, and @kbd{C-x
4 C-o} with alternative commands that are somewhat ``smarter.''
4 C-o} with alternative commands that are somewhat ``smarter''.
When one of these commands prompts you for a buffer name, you can
type in just a substring of the name you want to choose. As you enter
......
......@@ -331,7 +331,7 @@ you can do anything else in Emacs). @xref{MS-DOS}.
Just as you can run a compiler from Emacs and then visit the lines
with compilation errors, you can also run @command{grep} and then
visit the lines on which matches were found. This works by treating
the matches reported by @command{grep} as if they were ``errors.''
the matches reported by @command{grep} as if they were ``errors''.
The output buffer uses Grep mode, which is a variant of Compilation
mode (@pxref{Compilation Mode}).
......
......@@ -624,7 +624,7 @@ for all users in a @file{default.el} file. @xref{Init File}.
These calendar commands display the dates and times of the phases of
the moon (new moon, first quarter, full moon, last quarter). This
feature is useful for debugging problems that ``depend on the phase of
the moon.''
the moon''.
@table @kbd
@item M
......@@ -822,7 +822,7 @@ Display Mayan date for selected day (@code{calendar-mayan-print-date}).
Otherwise, move point to the date you want to convert, then type the
appropriate command starting with @kbd{p} from the table above. The
prefix @kbd{p} is a mnemonic for ``print,'' since Emacs ``prints'' the
prefix @kbd{p} is a mnemonic for ``print'', since Emacs ``prints'' the
equivalent date in the echo area. @kbd{p o} displays the
date in all forms known to Emacs. You can also use @kbd{Mouse-3} and
then choose @kbd{Other calendars} from the menu that appears. This
......@@ -901,7 +901,7 @@ Islamic, or French names.
@findex calendar-hebrew-list-yahrzeits
@cindex yahrzeits
One common issue concerning the Hebrew calendar is the computation
of the anniversary of a date of death, called a ``yahrzeit.'' The Emacs
of the anniversary of a date of death, called a ``yahrzeit''. The Emacs
calendar includes a facility for such calculations. If you are in the
calendar, the command @kbd{M-x calendar-hebrew-list-yahrzeits} asks you for
a range of years and then displays a list of the yahrzeit dates for those
......@@ -1426,8 +1426,8 @@ that applies to the fourth Thursday in November:
@noindent
The 11 specifies November (the eleventh month), the 4 specifies Thursday
(the fourth day of the week, where Sunday is numbered zero), and the
second 4 specifies the fourth Thursday (1 would mean ``first,'' 2 would
mean ``second,'' @minus{}2 would mean ``second-to-last,'' and so on).
second 4 specifies the fourth Thursday (1 would mean ``first'', 2 would
mean ``second'', @minus{}2 would mean ``second-to-last'', and so on).
The month can be a single month or a list of months. Thus you could change
the 11 above to @samp{'(1 2 3)} and have the entry apply to the last
Thursday of January, February, and March. If the month is @code{t}, the
......@@ -1681,7 +1681,7 @@ timeclock-change}.
Once you've collected data from a number of time intervals, you can use
@kbd{M-x timeclock-workday-remaining} to see how much time is left to
work today (assuming a typical average of 8 hours a day), and @kbd{M-x
timeclock-when-to-leave} which will calculate when you're ``done.''
timeclock-when-to-leave} which will calculate when you're ``done''.
@vindex timeclock-modeline-display
@findex timeclock-modeline-display
......
......@@ -442,7 +442,7 @@ Directory for the documentation string file, which is used to
initialize the Lisp variable @code{doc-directory}.
@item EMACSLOADPATH
A colon-separated list of directories@footnote{ Here and below,
whenever we say ``colon-separated list of directories,'' it pertains
whenever we say ``colon-separated list of directories'', it pertains
to Unix and GNU/Linux systems. On MS-DOS and MS-Windows, the
directories are separated by semi-colons instead, since DOS/Windows
file names might include a colon after a drive letter.} to search for
......
......@@ -166,7 +166,7 @@ commands, even though strictly speaking the key is bound to a command.
Usually we state the name of the command which really does the work in
parentheses after mentioning the key that runs it. For example, we
will say that ``The command @kbd{C-n} (@code{next-line}) moves point
vertically down,'' meaning that the command @code{next-line} moves
vertically down'', meaning that the command @code{next-line} moves
vertically down, and the key @kbd{C-n} is normally bound to it.
Since we are discussing customization, we should tell you about
......
......@@ -1922,7 +1922,7 @@ single click definition has run when the first click was received.
This constrains what you can do with double clicks, but user interface
designers say that this constraint ought to be followed in any case. A
double click should do something similar to the single click, only
``more so.'' The command for the double-click event should perform the
``more so''. The command for the double-click event should perform the
extra work for the double click.
If a double-click event has no binding, it changes to the
......@@ -1970,7 +1970,7 @@ or @samp{triple-}, which always precede @samp{drag-} or @samp{down-}.
A frame includes areas that don't show text from the buffer, such as
the mode line and the scroll bar. You can tell whether a mouse button
comes from a special area of the screen by means of dummy ``prefix
keys.'' For example, if you click the mouse in the mode line, you get
keys''. For example, if you click the mouse in the mode line, you get
the prefix key @code{mode-line} before the ordinary mouse-button symbol.
Thus, here is how to define the command for clicking the first button in
a mode line to run @code{scroll-up-command}:
......
......@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@ optionally some of its subdirectories as well. You can use the normal
Emacs commands to move around in this buffer, and special Dired
commands to operate on the listed files.
The Dired buffer is ``read-only,'' and inserting text in it is not
The Dired buffer is ``read-only'', and inserting text in it is not
allowed. Ordinary printing characters such as @kbd{d} and @kbd{x} are
redefined for special Dired commands. Some Dired commands @dfn{mark}
or @dfn{flag} the @dfn{current file} (that is, the file on the current
......@@ -1252,7 +1252,7 @@ and erases all flags and marks.
@findex wdired-change-to-wdired-mode
Wdired is a special mode that allows you to perform file operations
by editing the Dired buffer directly (the ``W'' in ``Wdired'' stands
for ``writable.'') To enter Wdired mode, type @kbd{C-x C-q}
for ``writable''.) To enter Wdired mode, type @kbd{C-x C-q}
(@code{dired-toggle-read-only}) while in a Dired buffer.
Alternatively, use the @samp{Immediate / Edit File Names} menu item.
......@@ -1297,7 +1297,7 @@ buffer containing image-dired, corresponding to the marked files.
You can also enter Image-Dired directly by typing @kbd{M-x
image-dired}. This prompts for a directory; specify one that has
image files. This creates thumbnails for all the images in that
directory, and displays them all in the ``thumbnail buffer.'' This
directory, and displays them all in the ``thumbnail buffer''. This
takes a long time if the directory contains many image files, and it
asks for confirmation if the number of image files exceeds
@code{image-dired-show-all-from-dir-max-files}.
......@@ -1408,7 +1408,7 @@ the current buffer.
The default comparison method (used if you type @key{RET} at the
prompt) is to compare just the file names---each file name that does
not appear in the other directory is ``different.'' You can specify
not appear in the other directory is ``different''. You can specify
more stringent comparisons by entering a Lisp expression, which can
refer to the variables @code{size1} and @code{size2}, the respective
file sizes; @code{mtime1} and @code{mtime2}, the last modification
......@@ -1416,7 +1416,7 @@ times in seconds, as floating point numbers; and @code{fa1} and
@code{fa2}, the respective file attribute lists (as returned by the
function @code{file-attributes}). This expression is evaluated for
each pair of like-named files, and if the expression's value is
non-@code{nil}, those files are considered ``different.''
non-@code{nil}, those files are considered ``different''.
For instance, the sequence @code{M-x dired-compare-directories
@key{RET} (> mtime1 mtime2) @key{RET}} marks files newer in this
......
......@@ -448,7 +448,7 @@ and visits it with View mode enabled.
@cindex synchronizing windows
@dfn{Follow mode} is a minor mode that makes two windows, both
showing the same buffer, scroll as a single tall ``virtual window.''
showing the same buffer, scroll as a single tall ``virtual window''.
To use Follow mode, go to a frame with just one window, split it into
two side-by-side windows using @kbd{C-x 3}, and then type @kbd{M-x
follow-mode}. From then on, you can edit the buffer in either of the
......@@ -982,15 +982,15 @@ fringes on the selected frame only, use @kbd{M-x set-fringe-style}.
line (@pxref{Continuation Lines}). When one line of text is split
into multiple screen lines, the left fringe shows a curving arrow for
each screen line except the first, indicating that ``this is not the
real beginning.'' The right fringe shows a curving arrow for each
real beginning''. The right fringe shows a curving arrow for each
screen line except the last, indicating that ``this is not the real
end.'' If the line's direction is right-to-left (@pxref{Bidirectional
end''. If the line's direction is right-to-left (@pxref{Bidirectional
Editing}), the meanings of the curving arrows in the fringes are
swapped.
The fringes indicate line truncation with short horizontal arrows
meaning ``there's more text on this line which is scrolled
horizontally out of view.'' Clicking the mouse on one of the arrows
horizontally out of view''. Clicking the mouse on one of the arrows
scrolls the display horizontally in the direction of the arrow.
The fringes can also indicate other things, such as buffer
......
......@@ -151,7 +151,7 @@ input. The mode line indicates Auto Advance mode with @samp{A}.
If Skip Prefers mode is in effect, the @kbd{n} and @kbd{p} commands
skip over differences in states ``prefer-A'' and ``prefer-B''
(@pxref{State of Difference}). Thus you see only differences for
which neither version is presumed ``correct.'' The mode line
which neither version is presumed ``correct''. The mode line
indicates Skip Prefers mode with @samp{S}. This mode is only relevant
when there is an ancestor.
......
......@@ -97,7 +97,7 @@ minibuffer, with a directory omitted, specifies the file
When typing a file name into the minibuffer, you can make use of a
couple of shortcuts: a double slash is interpreted as ``ignore
everything before the second slash in the pair,'' and @samp{~/} is
everything before the second slash in the pair'', and @samp{~/} is
interpreted as your home directory. @xref{Minibuffer File}.
@cindex environment variables in file names
......@@ -1340,7 +1340,7 @@ correct the line numbers in the hunk headers, to ensure that the diff
remains ``correct''. To disable automatic line number correction,
change the variable @code{diff-update-on-the-fly} to @code{nil}.
Diff mode treats each hunk as an ``error message,'' similar to
Diff mode treats each hunk as an ``error message'', similar to
Compilation mode. Thus, you can use commands such as @kbd{C-x '} to
visit the corresponding source locations. @xref{Compilation Mode}.
......
......@@ -207,7 +207,7 @@ the Fortran standard counts from 1.) The variable
@code{fortran-continuation-string} specifies what character to put in
column 5. A line that starts with a tab character followed by any digit
except @samp{0} is also a continuation line. We call this style of
continuation @dfn{tab format}. (Fortran 90 introduced ``free form,''
continuation @dfn{tab format}. (Fortran 90 introduced ``free form'',
with another style of continuation lines).
@vindex indent-tabs-mode @r{(Fortran mode)}
......
......@@ -96,7 +96,7 @@ of the major mode, then global bindings (@code{describe-bindings}).
@item C-h c @var{key}
Show the name of the command that the key sequence @var{key} is bound
to (@code{describe-key-briefly}). Here @kbd{c} stands for
``character.'' For more extensive information on @var{key}, use
``character''. For more extensive information on @var{key}, use
@kbd{C-h k}.
@item C-h d @var{topics} @key{RET}
Display the commands and variables whose documentation matches
......
......@@ -225,7 +225,7 @@ desired macro is at the head of the ring. To execute the new macro
ring head immediately, just type @kbd{C-k}.
Note that Emacs treats the head of the macro ring as the ``last
defined keyboard macro.'' For instance, @key{F4} will execute that
defined keyboard macro''. For instance, @key{F4} will execute that
macro, and @kbd{C-x C-k n} will give it a name.
@vindex kmacro-ring-max
......
......@@ -88,7 +88,7 @@ Find file: /u2/emacs/src//etc/termcap
@cindex slashes repeated in file name
@findex file-name-shadow-mode
Emacs interprets a double slash as ``ignore everything before the
second slash in the pair.'' In the example above,
second slash in the pair''. In the example above,
@file{/u2/emacs/src/} is ignored, so the argument you supplied is
@file{/etc/termcap}. The ignored part of the file name is dimmed if
the terminal allows it. (To disable this dimming, turn off File Name
......
......@@ -1191,7 +1191,7 @@ that buffer.
line mode, Term basically acts like Shell mode (@pxref{Shell Mode}).
In char mode, each character is sent directly to the subshell, as
``terminal input.'' Any ``echoing'' of your input is the
``terminal input''. Any ``echoing'' of your input is the
responsibility of the subshell. The sole exception is the terminal
escape character, which by default is @kbd{C-c} (@pxref{Term Mode}).
Any ``terminal output'' from the subshell goes into the buffer,
......@@ -2076,10 +2076,10 @@ Insert a byte with a code typed in octal.
Insert a byte with a code typed in hex.
@item C-x [
Move to the beginning of a 1k-byte ``page.''
Move to the beginning of a 1k-byte ``page''.
@item C-x ]
Move to the end of a 1k-byte ``page.''
Move to the end of a 1k-byte ``page''.
@item M-g
Move to an address specified in hex.
......@@ -2149,7 +2149,7 @@ usually turned on.
However, this may be slow if there are a lot of buffers in the
desktop. You can specify the maximum number of buffers to restore
immediately with the variable @code{desktop-restore-eager}; the
remaining buffers are restored ``lazily,'' when Emacs is idle.
remaining buffers are restored ``lazily'', when Emacs is idle.
@findex desktop-clear
@vindex desktop-globals-to-clear
......
......@@ -548,7 +548,7 @@ when invoked with the @samp{-nw} option.
@cindex inferior processes under MS-DOS
@findex compile @r{(MS-DOS)}
@findex grep @r{(MS-DOS)}
Because MS-DOS is a single-process ``operating system,''
Because MS-DOS is a single-process ``operating system'',
asynchronous subprocesses are not available. In particular, Shell
mode and its variants do not work. Most Emacs features that use
asynchronous subprocesses also don't work on MS-DOS, including
......
......@@ -199,7 +199,7 @@ C-b} (@code{picture-motion-reverse}) moves in the opposite direction.
With no argument, it moves to a point underneath the next
``interesting'' character that follows whitespace in the previous
nonblank line. ``Next'' here means ``appearing at a horizontal position
greater than the one point starts out at.'' With an argument, as in
greater than the one point starts out at''. With an argument, as in
@kbd{C-u M-@key{TAB}}, this command moves to the next such interesting
character in the current line. @kbd{M-@key{TAB}} does not change the
text; it only moves point. ``Interesting'' characters are defined by
......
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