Commit 16d1ff5f authored by Chong Yidong's avatar Chong Yidong

* frames.texi (Resources): Describe inhibit-x-resources.

(Size Parameters): Copyedit.

* hash.texi (Creating Hash):
* objects.texi (Hash Table Type): Document the new hash table
printed representation.

* minibuf.texi (Basic Completion): 4th arg to all-completions is
obsolete.

* processes.texi (Process Buffers): Document
process-kill-buffer-query-function.
parent 91ed7ea8
2009-12-25 Chong Yidong <cyd@stupidchicken.com>
* frames.texi (Resources): Describe inhibit-x-resources.
(Size Parameters): Copyedit.
* hash.texi (Creating Hash):
* objects.texi (Hash Table Type): Document the new hash table
printed representation.
* minibuf.texi (Basic Completion): 4th arg to all-completions is
obsolete.
* processes.texi (Process Buffers): Document
process-kill-buffer-query-function.
2009-12-05 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* hooks.texi (Standard Hooks): Remove diary-display-hook, replaced by
......
......@@ -610,15 +610,15 @@ the @code{user-position} parameter (see above) does for the position
parameters @code{top} and @code{left}.
@item fullscreen
Specify that width, height or both shall be maximized.
The value @code{fullwidth} specifies that width shall be as wide as possible.
Specify that width, height or both shall be maximized. The value
@code{fullwidth} specifies that width shall be as wide as possible.
The value @code{fullheight} specifies that height shall be as tall as
possible. The value @code{fullboth} specifies that both the
width and the height shall be set to the size of the screen.
The value @code{maximized} specifies that the frame shall be maximized.
The difference between @code{maximized} and @code{fullboth} is that
the first does have window manager decorations but the second does not
and thus really covers the whole screen.
possible. The value @code{fullboth} specifies that both the width and
the height shall be set to the size of the screen. The value
@code{maximized} specifies that the frame shall be maximized. The
difference between @code{maximized} and @code{fullboth} is that the
former still has window manager decorations while the latter really
covers the whole screen.
@end table
@node Layout Parameters
......@@ -2166,6 +2166,11 @@ If the name @var{color} is not defined, the value is @code{nil}.
@node Resources
@section X Resources
This section describes some of the functions and variables for
querying and using X resources, or their equivalent on your operating
system. @xref{X Resources,, X Resources, emacs, The GNU Emacs
Manual}, for more information about X resources.
@defun x-get-resource attribute class &optional component subclass
The function @code{x-get-resource} retrieves a resource value from the X
Window defaults database.
......@@ -2219,7 +2224,11 @@ or @file{~/.Xresources}). Then:
@end group
@end example
@xref{X Resources,, X Resources, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}.
@defvar inhibit-x-resources
If this variable is non-@code{nil}, Emacs does not look up X
resources, and X resources do not have any effect when creating new
frames.
@end defvar
@node Display Feature Testing
@section Display Feature Testing
......
......@@ -30,18 +30,13 @@ the way two alists can share a common tail.
@end itemize
Emacs Lisp provides a general-purpose hash table data type, along
with a series of functions for operating on them. Hash tables have no
read syntax, and print in hash notation, like this:
@example
(make-hash-table)
@result{} #<hash-table 'eql nil 0/65 0x83af980>
@end example
@noindent
(The term ``hash notation'' refers to the initial @samp{#}
character---@pxref{Printed Representation}---and has nothing to do with
the term ``hash table.'')
with a series of functions for operating on them. Hash tables have a
special printed representation, which consists of @samp{#s} followed
by a list specifying the hash table properties and contents.
@xref{Creating Hash}. (Note that the term ``hash notation'', which
refers to the initial @samp{#} character used in the printed
representations of objects with no read representation, has nothing to
do with the term ``hash table''. @xref{Printed Representation}.)
Obarrays are also a kind of hash table, but they are a different type
of object and are used only for recording interned symbols
......@@ -164,6 +159,35 @@ of key lookup.
This function is obsolete. Use @code{make-hash-table} instead.
@end defun
You can also create a new hash table using the printed representation
for hash tables. The Lisp reader can read this printed
representation, provided each element in the specified hash table has
a valid read syntax (@pxref{Printed Representation}). For instance,
the following specifies a new hash table containing the keys
@code{key1} and @code{key2} (both symbols) associated with @code{val1}
(a symbol) and @code{300} (a number) respectively.
@example
#s(hash-table size 30 data (key1 val1 key2 300))
@end example
@noindent
The printed representation for a hash table consists of @samp{#s}
followed by a list beginning with @samp{hash-table}. The rest of the
list should consist of zero or more property-value pairs specifying
the hash table's properties and initial contents. The properties and
values are read literally. Valid property names are @code{size},
@code{test}, @code{weakness}, @code{rehash-size},
@code{rehash-threshold}, and @code{data}. The @code{data} property
should be a list of key-value pairs for the initial contents; the
other properties have the same meanings as the matching
@code{make-hash-table} keywords (@code{:size}, @code{:test}, etc.),
described above.
Note that you cannot specify a hash table whose initial contents
include objects that have no read syntax, such as buffers and frames.
Such objects may be added to the hash table after it is created.
@node Hash Access
@section Hash Table Access
......
......@@ -769,10 +769,11 @@ This function returns a list of all possible completions of
@var{string}. The arguments to this function (aside from
@var{nospace}) are the same as those of @code{try-completion}. Also,
this function uses @code{completion-regexp-list} in the same way that
@code{try-completion} does. The optional argument @var{nospace} only
matters if @var{string} is the empty string. In that case, if
@var{nospace} is non-@code{nil}, completions that start with a space
are ignored.
@code{try-completion} does.
The optional argument @var{nospace} is obsolete. If it is
non-@code{nil}, completions that start with a space are ignored unless
@var{string} starts with a space.
If @var{collection} is a function, it is called with three arguments:
@var{string}, @var{predicate} and @code{t}; then @code{all-completions}
......
......@@ -1219,14 +1219,18 @@ only the first 3 bits are used:
A hash table is a very fast kind of lookup table, somewhat like an
alist in that it maps keys to corresponding values, but much faster.
Hash tables have no read syntax, and print using hash notation.
@xref{Hash Tables}, for functions that operate on hash tables.
The printed representation of a hash table specifies its properties
and contents, like this:
@example
(make-hash-table)
@result{} #<hash-table 'eql nil 0/65 0x83af980>
@result{} #s(hash-table size 65 test eql rehash-size 1.5
rehash-threshold 0.8 data ())
@end example
@noindent
@xref{Hash Tables}, for more information about hash tables.
@node Function Type
@subsection Function Type
......
......@@ -1161,6 +1161,14 @@ the output is determined by the @code{process-mark}, which is then
updated to point to the end of the text just inserted. Usually, but not
always, the @code{process-mark} is at the end of the buffer.
@findex process-kill-buffer-query-function
Killing the associated buffer of a process also kills the process.
Emacs asks for confirmation first, if the process's
@code{process-query-on-exit-flag} is non-@code{nil} (@pxref{Query
Before Exit}). This confirmation is done by the function
@code{process-kill-buffer-query-function}, which is run from
@code{kill-buffer-query-functions} (@pxref{Killing Buffers}).
@defun process-buffer process
This function returns the associated buffer of the process
@var{process}.
......
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