Commit 1911e6e5 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

*** empty log message ***

parent e197b151
......@@ -12,10 +12,12 @@ function, by @dfn{advising the function}. This is a clean method for a
library to customize functions defined by other parts of Emacs---cleaner
than redefining the whole function.
Each piece of advice can be enabled or disabled explicitly. The
enabled pieces of advice for any given function actually take effect
when you activate advice for that function, or when that function is
subsequently defined or redefined.
@cindex piece of advice
Each function can have multiple @dfn{pieces of advice}, separately
defined. Each defined piece of advice can be enabled or disabled
explicitly. The enabled pieces of advice for any given function
actually take effect when you @dfn{activate} advice for that function, or when
that function is subsequently defined or redefined.
@strong{Usage Note:} Advice is useful for altering the behavior of
existing calls to an existing function. If you want the new behavior
......@@ -25,12 +27,13 @@ function (or a new command) which uses the existing function.
@menu
* Simple Advice:: A simple example to explain the basics of advice.
* Defining Advice:: Detailed description of @code{defadvice}.
* Around-Advice:: Wrapping advice around a function's definition.
* Computed Advice:: ...is to @code{defadvice} as @code{fset} is to @code{defun}.
* Activation of Advice:: Advice doesn't do anything until you activate it.
* Enabling Advice:: You can enable or disable each piece of advice.
* Preactivation:: Preactivation is a way of speeding up the
loading of compiled advice.
* Argument Access:: How advice can access the function's arguments.
* Argument Access in Advice:: How advice can access the function's arguments.
* Subr Arguments:: Accessing arguments when advising a primitive.
* Combined Definition:: How advice is implemented.
@end menu
......@@ -63,7 +66,6 @@ this:
(newline))))
@end example
@cindex piece of advice
This expression defines a @dfn{piece of advice} for the function
@code{previous-line}. This piece of advice is named
@code{next-line-at-end}, and the symbol @code{before} says that it is
......@@ -100,10 +102,12 @@ expression to wrap around the invocation of the base definition.
@node Defining Advice
@section Defining Advice
@cindex defining advice
@cindex advice, defining
To define a piece of advice, use the macro @code{defadvice}. A call
to @code{defadvice} has the following syntax, which is based on the
syntax of @code{defun}/@code{defmacro} but adds more:
syntax of @code{defun} and @code{defmacro}, but adds more:
@findex defadvice
@example
......@@ -132,14 +136,13 @@ wrapped around the execution of the function itself. After-advice and
around-advice can override the return value by setting
@code{ad-return-value}.
Around-advice specifies where the ``original'' function definition
should go by means of the special symbol @code{ad-do-it}. Where this
symbol occurs inside the around-advice body, it is replaced with a
@code{progn} containing the forms of the surrounded code. If the
around-advice does not use @code{ad-do-it}, then the original function
definition is never run. This provides a way to override the original
definition completely. (It also overrides lower-positioned pieces of
around-advice).
@defvar ad-return-value
While advice is executing, after the function's original definition has
been executed, this variable holds its return value, which will
ultimately be returned to the caller after finishing all the advice.
After-advice and around-advice can arrange to return some other value
by storing it in this variable.
@end defvar
The argument @var{name} is the name of the advice, a non-@code{nil}
symbol. The advice name uniquely identifies one piece of advice, within all
......@@ -152,11 +155,12 @@ definition calls for several different pieces of information.
The optional @var{position} specifies where, in the current list of
advice of the specified @var{class}, this new advice should be placed.
It should be either @code{first}, @code{last} or a number that
specifies a zero-based position (@code{first} is equivalent to 0). If
no position is specified, the default is @code{first}. The
@var{position} value is ignored when redefining an existing piece of
advice.
It should be either @code{first}, @code{last} or a number that specifies
a zero-based position (@code{first} is equivalent to 0). If no position
is specified, the default is @code{first}. Position values outside the
range of existing positions in this class are mapped to the beginning or
the end of the range, whichever is closer. The @var{position} value is
ignored when redefining an existing piece of advice.
The optional @var{arglist} can be used to define the argument list for
the sake of advice. This becomes the argument list of the combined
......@@ -168,12 +172,11 @@ This argument list must be compatible with the argument list of the
original function, so that it can handle the ways the function is
actually called. If more than one piece of advice specifies an argument
list, then the first one (the one with the smallest position) found in
the list of all classes of advice is used. Numbers outside the range
are mapped to the beginning or the end, whichever is closer.
the list of all classes of advice is used.
The remaining elements, @var{flags}, is a list of symbols that specify
further information about how to use this piece of advice. Here are the
valid symbols and their meanings:
The remaining elements, @var{flags}, are symbols that specify further
information about how to use this piece of advice. Here are the valid
symbols and their meanings:
@table @code
@item activate
......@@ -190,8 +193,8 @@ activate an undefined function's advice. However, defining
@item protect
Protect this piece of advice against non-local exits and errors in
preceding code and advice. Protecting advice makes it a cleanup in an
@code{unwind-protect} form, so that it will execute even if the
preceding code and advice. Protecting advice places it as a cleanup in
an @code{unwind-protect} form, so that it will execute even if the
previous code gets an error or uses @code{throw}. @xref{Cleanups}.
@item compile
......@@ -233,6 +236,38 @@ expanded when a program is compiled, not when a compiled program is run.
All subroutines used by the advice need to be available when the byte
compiler expands the macro.
@node Around-Advice
@section Around-Advice
Around-advice lets you ``wrap'' a Lisp expression ``around'' the
original function definition. You specify where the original function
definition should go by means of the special symbol @code{ad-do-it}.
Where this symbol occurs inside the around-advice body, it is replaced
with a @code{progn} containing the forms of the surrounded code. Here
is an example:
@example
(defadvice foo (around foo-around)
"Ignore case in `foo'."
(let ((case-fold-search t))
ad-do-it))
@end example
@noindent
Its effect is to make sure that case is ignored in
searches when the original definition of @code{foo} is run.
@defvar ad-do-it
This is not really a variable, but it is somewhat used like one
in around-advice. It specifies the place to run the function's
original definition and other ``earlier'' around-advice.
@end defvar
If the around-advice does not use @code{ad-do-it}, then it does not run
the original function definition. This provides a way to override the
original definition completely. (It also overrides lower-positioned
pieces of around-advice).
@node Computed Advice
@section Computed Advice
......@@ -270,6 +305,7 @@ replaced with the new one.
@node Activation of Advice
@section Activation of Advice
@cindex activating advice
@cindex advice, activating
By default, advice does not take effect when you define it---only when
you @dfn{activate} advice for the function that was advised. You can
......@@ -302,10 +338,13 @@ This command activates the advice for @var{function}.
To activate advice for a function whose advice is already active is not
a no-op. It is a useful operation which puts into effect any changes in
advice since the previous activation of that function's advice.
that function's advice since the previous activation of advice for that
function.
@deffn Command ad-deactivate function
This command deactivates the advice for @var{function}.
@cindex deactivating advice
@cindex advice, deactivating
@end deffn
@deffn Command ad-activate-all &optional compile
......@@ -323,7 +362,7 @@ which has at least one piece of advice that matches @var{regexp}.
@end deffn
@deffn Command ad-deactivate-regexp regexp
This command deactivates the advice for all functions whose names match
This command deactivates all pieces of advice whose names match
@var{regexp}. More precisely, it deactivates all advice for any
function which has at least one piece of advice that matches
@var{regexp}.
......@@ -332,6 +371,7 @@ function which has at least one piece of advice that matches
@deffn Command ad-update-regexp regexp &optional compile
This command activates pieces of advice whose names match @var{regexp},
but only those for functions whose advice is already activated.
@cindex reactivating advice
Reactivating a function's advice is useful for putting into effect all
the changes that have been made in its advice (including enabling and
......@@ -355,17 +395,20 @@ This variable controls whether to compile the combined definition
that results from activating advice for a function.
@end defopt
If the advised definition was constructed during ``preactivation'' (see
below), then that definition must already be compiled, because it was
constructed during byte-compilation of the file that contained the
@code{defadvice} with the @code{preactivate} flag.
If the advised definition was constructed during ``preactivation''
(@pxref{Preactivation}), then that definition must already be compiled,
because it was constructed during byte-compilation of the file that
contained the @code{defadvice} with the @code{preactivate} flag.
@node Enabling Advice
@section Enabling and Disabling Advice
@cindex enabling advice
@cindex advice, enabling and disabling
@cindex disabling advice
Each piece of advice has a flag that says whether it is enabled or
not. By enabling or disabling a piece of advice, you can turn it off
and on without having to undefine and redefine it. For example, here is
not. By enabling or disabling a piece of advice, you can turn it on
and off without having to undefine and redefine it. For example, here is
how to disable a particular piece of advice named @code{my-advice} for
the function @code{foo}:
......@@ -373,7 +416,7 @@ the function @code{foo}:
(ad-disable-advice 'foo 'before 'my-advice)
@end example
This function by itself only changes the enable flag for a piece of
This function by itself only changes the enable flag for a piece of
advice. To make the change take effect in the advised definition, you
must activate the advice for @code{foo} again:
......@@ -408,6 +451,8 @@ This command enables all pieces of advice whose names match
@node Preactivation
@section Preactivation
@cindex preactivating advice
@cindex advice, preactivating
Constructing a combined definition to execute advice is moderately
expensive. When a library advises many functions, this can make loading
......@@ -486,7 +531,7 @@ for that function.
A more robust method is to use macros that are translated into the
proper access forms at activation time, i.e., when constructing the
advised definition. Access macros access actual arguments by position
regardless of how these actual argument get distributed onto the
regardless of how these actual arguments get distributed onto the
argument variables of a function. This is robust because in Emacs Lisp
the meaning of an argument is strictly determined by its position in the
argument list.
......
......@@ -73,7 +73,7 @@ or the strings are not equal.
or specified padding.
@item
The functions @code{split-string} and @code{concat-chars} no longer exist.
The functions @code{split-string} and @code{string} no longer exist.
Neither does @code{store-substring} or @code{sref}.
@item
......
......@@ -588,17 +588,17 @@ about them, you can get rid of them by reading in the previous version
of the file with the @code{revert-buffer} command. @xref{Reverting, ,
Reverting a Buffer, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}.
@deffn Command revert-buffer &optional check-auto-save noconfirm
@deffn Command revert-buffer &optional ignore-auto noconfirm
This command replaces the buffer text with the text of the visited
file on disk. This action undoes all changes since the file was visited
or saved.
If the argument @var{check-auto-save} is non-@code{nil}, and the
latest auto-save file is more recent than the visited file,
@code{revert-buffer} asks the user whether to use that instead.
Otherwise, it always uses the text of the visited file itself.
Interactively, @var{check-auto-save} is set if there is a numeric prefix
argument.
By default, if the latest auto-save file is more recent than the visited
file, @code{revert-buffer} asks the user whether to use that instead.
But if the argument @var{ignore-auto} is non-@code{nil}, then only the
the visited file itself is used. Interactively, @var{ignore-auto} is
@code{t} unless there is a numeric prefix argument; thus, the
interactive default is to check the auto-save file.
Normally, @code{revert-buffer} asks for confirmation before it changes
the buffer; but if the argument @var{noconfirm} is non-@code{nil},
......@@ -616,6 +616,14 @@ buffer. Preserving any additional markers would be problematical.
You can customize how @code{revert-buffer} does its work by setting
these variables---typically, as buffer-local variables.
@defvar revert-without-query
This variable holds a list of files that should be reverted without
query. The value is a list of regular expressions. If a file name
matches one of these regular expressions, then @code{revert-buffer}
reverts the file without asking the user for confirmation, if the file
has changed on disk and the buffer is not modified.
@end defvar
@defvar revert-buffer-function
The value of this variable is the function to use to revert this buffer.
If non-@code{nil}, it is called as a function with no arguments to do
......
......@@ -213,7 +213,7 @@ If the buffer that used to be current has been killed by the time of
exit from @code{save-current-buffer}, then it is not made current again,
of course. Instead, whichever buffer was current just before exit
remains current.
@end defmac
@end defspec
@defmac with-current-buffer buffer body...
@tindex with-current-buffer
......@@ -427,7 +427,7 @@ the same file name. In such cases, this function returns the first
such buffer in the buffer list.
@end defun
@deffn Command set-visited-file-name filename
@deffn Command set-visited-file-name filename &optional no-query along-with-file
If @var{filename} is a non-empty string, this function changes the
name of the file visited in current buffer to @var{filename}. (If the
buffer had no visited file, this gives it one.) The @emph{next time}
......@@ -440,6 +440,13 @@ If @var{filename} is @code{nil} or the empty string, that stands for
``no visited file''. In this case, @code{set-visited-file-name} marks
the buffer as having no visited file.
Normally, this function asks the user for confirmation if the specified
file already exists. If @var{no-query} is non-@code{nil}, that prevents
asking this question.
If @var{along-with-file} is non-@code{nil}, that means to assume that the
former visited file has been renamed to @var{filename}.
@c Wordy to avoid overfull hbox. --rjc 16mar92
When the function @code{set-visited-file-name} is called interactively, it
prompts for @var{filename} in the minibuffer.
......@@ -723,21 +730,21 @@ live buffer.
@code{buffer-list} frame parameter with @code{modify-frame-parameters}
(@pxref{Parameter Access}).
@defun other-buffer &optional buffer visible-ok
@defun other-buffer &optional buffer visible-ok frame
This function returns the first buffer in the buffer list other than
@var{buffer}. Usually this is the buffer selected most recently (in the
currently selected frame), aside from @var{buffer}. Buffers whose names
start with a space are not considered at all.
@var{buffer}. Usually this is the buffer selected most recently (in
frame @var{frame} or else the currently selected frame), aside from
@var{buffer}. Buffers whose names start with a space are not considered
at all.
If @var{buffer} is not supplied (or if it is not a buffer), then
@code{other-buffer} returns the first buffer in the selected frame's
buffer list that is not now visible in any window in a visible frame.
If the selected frame has a non-@code{nil} @code{buffer-predicate}
parameter, then @code{other-buffer} uses that predicate to decide which
buffers to consider. It calls the predicate once for each buffer, and
if the value is @code{nil}, that buffer is ignored. @xref{Window Frame
Parameters}.
If @var{frame} has a non-@code{nil} @code{buffer-predicate} parameter,
then @code{other-buffer} uses that predicate to decide which buffers to
consider. It calls the predicate once for each buffer, and if the value
is @code{nil}, that buffer is ignored. @xref{Window Frame Parameters}.
@c Emacs 19 feature
If @var{visible-ok} is @code{nil}, @code{other-buffer} avoids returning
......
......@@ -577,7 +577,7 @@ HHeshvan 25 Happy Hebrew birthday!
@noindent
and would appear in the diary for any date that corresponds to Heshvan 25
on the Hebrew calendar. And here is Islamic-date diary entry that matches
on the Hebrew calendar. And here is an Islamic-date diary entry that matches
Dhu al-Qada 25:
@smallexample
......@@ -668,7 +668,7 @@ shown in the fancy diary buffer, set the variable
@cindex sorting diary entries
If you use the fancy diary display, you can use the normal hook
@code{list-diary-entries-hook} to sort each day's diary entries by their
time of day. Here's how
time of day. Here's how:
@findex sort-diary-entries
@example
......
......@@ -1589,7 +1589,7 @@ buffer position. Here's how to do that:
(- (point-max) (point-min))))
@end example
Recall that scroll bar events have two integers forming ratio in place
Recall that scroll bar events have two integers forming a ratio, in place
of a pair of x and y coordinates.
@end defun
......@@ -1652,7 +1652,8 @@ and such numbers cannot be included in a string.
To support programs with @samp{\M-} in string constants, there are
special rules for including certain meta characters in a string.
Here are the rules for interpreting keyboard
Here are the rules for interpreting a string as a sequence of input
characters:
@itemize @bullet
@item
......@@ -1854,7 +1855,7 @@ If @code{cursor-in-echo-area} is non-@code{nil}, then @code{read-event}
moves the cursor temporarily to the echo area, to the end of any message
displayed there. Otherwise @code{read-event} does not move the cursor.
If @code{read-event} gets an event is defined as a help character, in
If @code{read-event} gets an event that is defined as a help character, in
some cases @code{read-event} processes the event directly without
returning. @xref{Help Functions}. Certain other events, called
@dfn{special events}, are also processed directly within
......@@ -1948,7 +1949,8 @@ What character-@kbd{177}
This section describes how to ``peek ahead'' at events without using
them up, how to check for pending input, and how to discard pending
input.
input. See also the function @code{read-passwd} (@pxref{Reading a
Password}).
@defvar unread-command-events
@cindex next input
......
......@@ -372,9 +372,9 @@ The value must be a directory name, and you can do completion with
@item hook
The value must be a list of functions (or a single function, but that is
obsolete usage). This customization type is used for hook variables.
You can use the @code{:option} in the @code{defcustom} for a hook
variable to specify functions recommended for use in the hook;
see @ref{Variable Definitions}.
You can use the @code{:options} keyword in a hook variable's
@code{defcustom} to specify a list of functions recommended for use in
the hook; see @ref{Variable Definitions}.
@item symbol
The value must be a symbol. It appears in the customization buffer as
......
......@@ -124,7 +124,7 @@ the debugger gets a chance.
If you set @code{debug-on-signal} to a non-@code{nil} value, then the
debugger gets the first chance at every error; an error will invoke the
debugger regardless of any @code{condition-case}, if it fits the
criterion specified by the values of @code{debug-on-error} and
criteria specified by the values of @code{debug-on-error} and
@code{debug-ignored-errors}.
@strong{Warning:} This variable is strong medicine! Various parts of
......@@ -139,9 +139,9 @@ enter the debugger.
To debug an error that happens during loading of the @file{.emacs}
file, use the option @samp{--debug-init}, which binds
@code{debug-on-error} to @code{t} while @file{.emacs} is loaded, and
@code{debug-on-error} to @code{t} while loading @file{.emacs}, and
bypasses the @code{condition-case} which normally catches errors in the
init-file.
init file.
If your @file{.emacs} file sets @code{debug-on-error}, the effect may
not last past the end of loading @file{.emacs}. (This is an undesirable
......@@ -737,7 +737,7 @@ the old indentation actually fit the intended nesting of parentheses,
and you have put back those parentheses, @kbd{C-M-q} should not change
anything.
@node Compilation Errors, Edebug, Syntax Errors, Debugging
@node Compilation Errors
@section Debugging Problems in Compilation
When an error happens during byte compilation, it is normally due to
......
......@@ -11,7 +11,6 @@ that Emacs presents to the user.
@menu
* Refresh Screen:: Clearing the screen and redrawing everything on it.
* Screen Size:: How big is the Emacs screen.
* Truncation:: Folding or wrapping long text lines.
* The Echo Area:: Where messages are displayed.
* Invisible Text:: Hiding part of the buffer text.
......@@ -33,7 +32,7 @@ that Emacs presents to the user.
@section Refreshing the Screen
The function @code{redraw-frame} redisplays the entire contents of a
given frame. @xref{Frames}.
given frame (@pxref{Frames}).
@c Emacs 19 feature
@defun redraw-frame frame
......@@ -65,65 +64,6 @@ has been suspended and resumed. Non-@code{nil} means there is no need
to redraw, @code{nil} means redrawing is needed. The default is @code{nil}.
@end defvar
@node Screen Size
@section Screen Size
@cindex size of screen
@cindex screen size
@cindex display lines
@cindex display columns
@cindex resize redisplay
The screen size functions access or specify the height or width of
the terminal. When you are using multiple frames, they apply to the
selected frame (@pxref{Frames}).
@defun screen-height
This function returns the number of lines on the screen that are
available for display.
@example
@group
(screen-height)
@result{} 50
@end group
@end example
@end defun
@defun screen-width
This function returns the number of columns on the screen that are
available for display.
@example
@group
(screen-width)
@result{} 80
@end group
@end example
@end defun
@defun set-screen-height lines &optional not-actual-size
This function declares that the terminal can display @var{lines} lines.
The sizes of existing windows are altered proportionally to fit.
If @var{not-actual-size} is non-@code{nil}, then Emacs displays
@var{lines} lines of output, but does not change its value for the
actual height of the screen. (Knowing the correct actual size may be
necessary for correct cursor positioning.) Using a smaller height than
the terminal actually implements may be useful to reproduce behavior
observed on a smaller screen, or if the terminal malfunctions when using
its whole screen.
If @var{lines} is different from what it was previously, then the
entire screen is cleared and redisplayed using the new size.
This function returns @code{nil}.
@end defun
@defun set-screen-width columns &optional not-actual-size
This function declares that the terminal can display @var{columns}
columns. The details are as in @code{set-screen-height}.
@end defun
@node Truncation
@section Truncation
@cindex line wrapping
......@@ -173,7 +113,7 @@ a window, that forces truncation.
You can override the glyphs that indicate continuation or truncation
using the display table; see @ref{Display Tables}.
If your buffer contains @strong{very} long lines, and you use
If your buffer contains @emph{very} long lines, and you use
continuation to display them, just thinking about them can make Emacs
redisplay slow. The column computation and indentation functions also
become slow. Then you might find it advisable to set
......@@ -395,7 +335,7 @@ overlaps the overlay on exit from the search.
During the search, such overlays are made temporarily visible by
temporarily modifying their invisible and intangible properties. If you
want this to be done differently for a certain overlays, give it a
want this to be done differently for a certain overlay, give it a
@code{isearch-open-invisible-temporary} property which is a function.
The function is called with two arguments: the first is the overlay, and
the second is @code{t} to make the overlay visible, or @code{nil} to
......@@ -1093,7 +1033,7 @@ subsequent elements of @var{spec} are never used. Normally
@code{t} is used in the last (or only) element of @var{spec}.
@item a list
If @var{display} is alist, each elements should have the form
If @var{display} is a list, each element should have the form
@code{(@var{characteristic} @var{value}@dots{})}. Here
@var{characteristic} specifies a way of classifying frames, and the
@var{value}s are possible classifications which @var{display} should
......@@ -1110,7 +1050,7 @@ What kinds of colors the frame supports---either @code{color},
@code{grayscale}, or @code{mono}.
@item background
The kind of background--- either @code{light} or @code{dark}.
The kind of background---either @code{light} or @code{dark}.
@end table
If an element of @var{display} specifies more than one @var{value} for a
......@@ -1139,6 +1079,15 @@ with @code{defface}:
with the customization buffer, and @code{face-documentation} for the
documentation string.
@tindex frame-background-mode
@defopt frame-background-mode
This option, if non-@code{nil}, specifies the background type to use for
interpreting face definitions. If it is @code{dark}, then Emacs treats
all frames as if they had a dark background, regardless of their actual
background colors. If it is @code{light}, then Emacs treats all frames
as if they had a light background.
@end defopt
@node Merging Faces
@subsection Merging Faces for Display
......@@ -1339,6 +1288,12 @@ for more information about Transient Mark mode.
Normally, the value is the face number of the face named @code{region}.
@end defvar
@tindex frame-update-face-colors
@defun frame-update-face-colors frame
This function updates the way faces display on @var{frame}, for a change
in @var{frame}'s foreground or background color.
@end defun
@node Blinking
@section Blinking Parentheses
@cindex parenthesis matching
......@@ -1356,23 +1311,23 @@ The value of @code{blink-paren-function} may be @code{nil}, in which
case nothing is done.
@end defvar
@defvar blink-matching-paren
@defopt blink-matching-paren
If this variable is @code{nil}, then @code{blink-matching-open} does
nothing.
@end defvar
@end defopt
@defvar blink-matching-paren-distance
@defopt blink-matching-paren-distance
This variable specifies the maximum distance to scan for a matching
parenthesis before giving up.
@end defvar
@end defopt
@defvar blink-matching-paren-delay
@defopt blink-matching-delay
This variable specifies the number of seconds for the cursor to remain
at the matching parenthesis. A fraction of a second often gives
good results, but the default is 1, which works on all systems.
@end defvar
@end defopt
@defun blink-matching-open
@deffn Command blink-matching-open
This function is the default value of @code{blink-paren-function}. It
assumes that point follows a character with close parenthesis syntax and
moves the cursor momentarily to the matching opening character. If that
......@@ -1398,7 +1353,7 @@ Here is an example of calling this function explicitly.
(blink-matching-open)))
@end group
@end smallexample
@end defun
@end deffn
@node Inverse Video
@section Inverse Video
......@@ -1655,13 +1610,13 @@ below).
Here are the possible types of elements in the glyph table:
@table @var
@item string
@table @asis
@item @var{string}
Send the characters in @var{string} to the terminal to output
this glyph. This alternative is available on character terminals,
but not under a window system.
@item integer
@item @var{integer}
Define this glyph code as an alias for glyph code @var{integer}. You
can use an alias to specify a face code for the glyph; see below.
......@@ -1705,13 +1660,13 @@ It also terminates any keyboard macro currently executing unless