Commit 1ada2e55 authored by Eli Zaretskii's avatar Eli Zaretskii
Browse files

Improve documentation of special events and of the "e" interactive spec.

 doc/lispref/commands.texi (Special Events): Mention language-change event.
 (Input Events, Interactive Codes):
 doc/lispref/keymaps.texi (Key Sequences): Mention events that are
 non-keyboard but also non-mouse events.
parent 07fb592e
2012-07-21 Eli Zaretskii <eliz@gnu.org>
* commands.texi (Special Events): Mention language-change event.
(Input Events, Interactive Codes):
* keymaps.texi (Key Sequences): Mention events that are
non-keyboard but also non-mouse events.
2012-07-17 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
* text.texi (Insertion): Document insert-char changes.
......
......@@ -379,9 +379,14 @@ current buffer, @code{default-directory} (@pxref{File Name Expansion}).
Existing, Completion, Default, Prompt.
@item e
The first or next mouse event in the key sequence that invoked the command.
More precisely, @samp{e} gets events that are lists, so you can look at
the data in the lists. @xref{Input Events}. No I/O.
The first or next non-keyboard event in the key sequence that invoked
the command. More precisely, @samp{e} gets events that are lists, so
you can look at the data in the lists. @xref{Input Events}. No I/O.
You use @samp{e} for mouse events and for special system events
(@pxref{Misc Events}). The event list that the command receives
depends on the event. @xref{Input Events}, which describes the forms
of the list for each event in the corresponding subsections.
You can use @samp{e} more than once in a single command's interactive
specification. If the key sequence that invoked the command has
......@@ -972,9 +977,10 @@ moving point out of these sequences is completely turned off.
@cindex input events
The Emacs command loop reads a sequence of @dfn{input events} that
represent keyboard or mouse activity. The events for keyboard activity
are characters or symbols; mouse events are always lists. This section
describes the representation and meaning of input events in detail.
represent keyboard or mouse activity, or system events sent to Emacs.
The events for keyboard activity are characters or symbols; other
events are always lists. This section describes the representation
and meaning of input events in detail.
@defun eventp object
This function returns non-@code{nil} if @var{object} is an input event
......@@ -2840,11 +2846,11 @@ immediately after they are read, and this is the way for the event's
definition to find the actual event.
The events types @code{iconify-frame}, @code{make-frame-visible},
@code{delete-frame}, @code{drag-n-drop}, and user signals like
@code{sigusr1} are normally handled in this way. The keymap which
defines how to handle special events---and which events are
special---is in the variable @code{special-event-map} (@pxref{Active
Keymaps}).
@code{delete-frame}, @code{drag-n-drop}, @code{language-change}, and
user signals like @code{sigusr1} are normally handled in this way.
The keymap which defines how to handle special events---and which
events are special---is in the variable @code{special-event-map}
(@pxref{Active Keymaps}).
@node Waiting
@section Waiting for Elapsed Time or Input
......
......@@ -45,7 +45,8 @@ is found. The whole process is called @dfn{key lookup}.
A @dfn{key sequence}, or @dfn{key} for short, is a sequence of one
or more input events that form a unit. Input events include
characters, function keys, and mouse actions (@pxref{Input Events}).
characters, function keys, mouse actions, or system events external to
Emacs, such as @code{iconify-frame} (@pxref{Input Events}).
The Emacs Lisp representation for a key sequence is a string or
vector. Unless otherwise stated, any Emacs Lisp function that accepts
a key sequence as an argument can handle both representations.
......@@ -62,9 +63,10 @@ sequence is the concatenation of the string representations of the
constituent events; thus, @code{"\C-xl"} represents the key sequence
@kbd{C-x l}.
Key sequences containing function keys, mouse button events, or
non-@acronym{ASCII} characters such as @kbd{C-=} or @kbd{H-a} cannot be
represented as strings; they have to be represented as vectors.
Key sequences containing function keys, mouse button events, system
events, or non-@acronym{ASCII} characters such as @kbd{C-=} or
@kbd{H-a} cannot be represented as strings; they have to be
represented as vectors.
In the vector representation, each element of the vector represents
an input event, in its Lisp form. @xref{Input Events}. For example,
......
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