Commit 1b53c26e authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

(Inserting Text): Cleanup wording.

(Moving Point): Doc PRIOR, PAGEUP, NEXT, PAGEDOWN more systematically.
C-n is not error at end of buffer.
(Undo): Doc C-/ like C-_.  Add xrefs.
(Arguments): META key may be labeled ALT.
Peculiar arg meanings are explained in doc strings.
parent e319d017
......@@ -73,7 +73,7 @@ point, the one underneath the cursor, like @kbd{C-d} (see below).
@cindex newline
To end a line and start typing a new one, type @key{RET}. This
inserts a newline character in the buffer. If point is in the middle of
a line, @key{RET} splits the line. Typing @key{DEL} when the cursor is
a line, the effect is to split the line. Typing @key{DEL} when the cursor is
at the beginning of a line deletes the preceding newline, thus joining
the line with the preceding line.
......@@ -219,17 +219,21 @@ numeric argument @var{n}, move to @var{n}/10 of the way from the top.
@item M->
Move to the end of the buffer (@code{end-of-buffer}).
@item C-v
Scroll the display one screen forward, and move point if necessary to put
it on the screen (@code{scroll-up}). This doesn't always
move point, but it is commonly used to do so.
If your keyboard has a @key{PAGEDOWN} key, it does the same thing.
@itemx @key{PAGEDOWN}
@itemx @key{PRIOR}
Scroll the display one screen forward, and move point if necessary to
put it on the screen (@code{scroll-up}). This doesn't always move
point, but it is commonly used to do so. If your keyboard has a
@key{PAGEDOWN} or @key{PRIOR} key, it does the same thing.
Scrolling commands are further described in @ref{Scrolling}.
@item M-v
@itemx @key{PAGEUP}
@itemx @key{NEXT}
Scroll one screen backward, and move point if necessary to put it on
the screen (@code{scroll-down}). This doesn't always move point, but
it is commonly used to do so. The @key{PAGEUP} key has the same
effect.
it is commonly used to do so. If your keyboard has a @key{PAGEUP} or
@key{NEXT} key, it does the same thing.
@item M-x goto-char
Read a number @var{n} and move point to buffer position @var{n}.
Position 1 is the beginning of the buffer.
......@@ -256,11 +260,11 @@ to the end of another line. Normally, @code{track-eol} is @code{nil}.
@xref{Variables}, for how to set variables such as @code{track-eol}.
@vindex next-line-add-newlines
@kbd{C-n} normally gets an error when you use it on the last line of
the buffer (just as @kbd{C-p} gets an error on the first line). But
if you set the variable @code{next-line-add-newlines} to a
non-@code{nil} value, @kbd{C-n} on the last line of a buffer creates
an additional line at the end and moves down onto it.
@kbd{C-n} normally stops at the end of the bufer when you use it on
the last line of the buffer. But if you set the variable
@code{next-line-add-newlines} to a non-@code{nil} value, @kbd{C-n} on
the last line of a buffer creates an additional line at the end and
moves down onto it.
@node Erasing
@section Erasing Text
......@@ -319,6 +323,7 @@ tedious.
@item C-x u
Undo one batch of changes---usually, one command worth (@code{undo}).
@item C-_
@itemx C-/
The same.
@item C-u C-x u
Undo one batch of changes in the region.
......@@ -326,10 +331,12 @@ Undo one batch of changes in the region.
@kindex C-x u
@kindex C-_
@kindex C-/
@findex undo
The command @kbd{C-x u} or @kbd{C-_} is how you undo. The first time
you give this command, it undoes the last change. Point moves back to
where it was before the command that made the change.
The command @kbd{C-x u} (or @kbd{C-_} or @kbd{C-/}) is how you undo.
The first time you give this command, it undoes the last change.
Point moves back to where it was before the command that made the
change.
Consecutive repetitions of @kbd{C-_} or @kbd{C-x u} undo earlier and
earlier changes, back to the limit of the undo information available.
......@@ -345,14 +352,16 @@ the sequence of undoing, then type more undo commands.
@cindex selective undo
@kindex C-u C-x u
Ordinary undo applies to all changes made in the current buffer. You
can also perform @dfn{selective undo}, limited to the current region.
can also perform @dfn{selective undo}, limited to the current region
(@pxref{The Region}).
To do this, specify the region you want, then run the @code{undo}
command with a prefix argument (the value does not matter): @kbd{C-u C-x
u} or @kbd{C-u C-_}. This undoes the most recent change in the region.
To undo further changes in the same region, repeat the @code{undo}
command (no prefix argument is needed). In Transient Mark mode, any use
of @code{undo} when there is an active region performs selective undo;
you do not need a prefix argument.
command (no prefix argument is needed). In Transient Mark mode
(@pxref{Transient Mark}), any use of @code{undo} when there is an
active region performs selective undo; you do not need a prefix
argument.
If you notice that a buffer has been modified accidentally, the
easiest way to recover is to type @kbd{C-_} repeatedly until the stars
......@@ -407,11 +416,10 @@ future. But if you didn't expect the command to create such large
undo data, then it is probably a bug and you should report it.
@xref{Bugs,, Reporting Bugs}.
The reason the @code{undo} command has two keys, @kbd{C-x u} and
@kbd{C-_}, set up to run it is that it is worthy of a single-character
key, but on some keyboards it is not obvious how to type @kbd{C-_}.
@kbd{C-x u} is an alternative you can type straightforwardly on any
terminal.
The reason the @code{undo} command has three key bindings, @kbd{C-x
u}, @kbd{C-_} and @kbd{C-/}, is that it is worthy of a
single-character key, but @kbd{C-x u} is more straightforward for
beginners to type.
@node Basic Files
@section Files
......@@ -722,9 +730,10 @@ act in the opposite direction.
@kindex M-@t{-}
@findex digit-argument
@findex negative-argument
If your terminal keyboard has a @key{META} key, the easiest way to
specify a numeric argument is to type digits and/or a minus sign while
holding down the @key{META} key. For example,
If your terminal keyboard has a @key{META} key (labeled @key{ALT} on
PC keyboards), the easiest way to specify a numeric argument is to
type digits and/or a minus sign while holding down the @key{META} key.
For example,
@example
M-5 C-n
......@@ -777,8 +786,9 @@ with an argument of one. (@xref{Killing}, for more information on
A few commands treat a plain @kbd{C-u} differently from an ordinary
argument. A few others may treat an argument of just a minus sign
differently from an argument of @minus{}1. These unusual cases are
described when they come up; they are always for reasons of convenience
of use of the individual command.
described when they come up; they are always for reasons of
convenience of use of the individual command, and they are documented
in the command's documentation string.
You can use a numeric argument to insert multiple copies of a
character. This is straightforward unless the character is a digit; for
......
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