Commit 1ba2ce68 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

Don't use "print" for displaying a message.

parent 6830ceb7
......@@ -334,7 +334,7 @@ where it was before the command that made the change.
Consecutive repetitions of @kbd{C-_} or @kbd{C-x u} undo earlier and
earlier changes, back to the limit of the undo information available.
If all recorded changes have already been undone, the undo command
prints an error message and does nothing.
displays an error message and does nothing.
Any command other than an undo command breaks the sequence of undo
commands. Starting from that moment, the previous undo commands become
......@@ -592,12 +592,13 @@ is relative to the accessible portion (@pxref{Narrowing}). By contrast,
region and the line number relative to the whole buffer.
@kbd{M-x what-page} counts pages from the beginning of the file, and
counts lines within the page, printing both numbers. @xref{Pages}.
counts lines within the page, showing both numbers in the echo area.
@xref{Pages}.
@kindex M-=
@findex count-lines-region
While on this subject, we might as well mention @kbd{M-=} (@code{count-lines-region}),
which prints the number of lines in the region (@pxref{Mark}).
which displays the number of lines in the region (@pxref{Mark}).
@xref{Pages}, for the command @kbd{C-x l} which counts the lines in the
current page.
......@@ -605,7 +606,7 @@ current page.
@findex what-cursor-position
The command @kbd{C-x =} (@code{what-cursor-position}) can be used to find out
the column that the cursor is in, and other miscellaneous information about
point. It prints a line in the echo area that looks like this:
point. It displays a line in the echo area that looks like this:
@smallexample
Char: c (0143, 99, 0x63) point=21044 of 26883(78%) column 53
......@@ -633,7 +634,7 @@ percentage of the total size.
columns from the left edge of the window.
If the buffer has been narrowed, making some of the text at the
beginning and the end temporarily inaccessible, @kbd{C-x =} prints
beginning and the end temporarily inaccessible, @kbd{C-x =} displays
additional text describing the currently accessible range. For example, it
might display this:
......
......@@ -269,7 +269,7 @@ Display the number of days in the current region
@kindex M-= @r{(Calendar mode)}
@findex calendar-count-days-region
To determine the number of days in the region, type @kbd{M-=}
(@code{calendar-count-days-region}). The numbers of days printed is
(@code{calendar-count-days-region}). The numbers of days shown is
@emph{inclusive}; that is, it includes the days specified by mark and
point.
......@@ -290,7 +290,7 @@ Exit from calendar (@code{exit-calendar}).
@kindex p d @r{(Calendar mode)}
@cindex day of year
@findex calendar-print-day-of-year
To print the number of days elapsed since the start of the year, or
To display the number of days elapsed since the start of the year, or
the number of days remaining in the year, type the @kbd{p d} command
(@code{calendar-print-day-of-year}). This displays both of those
numbers in the echo area. The number of days elapsed includes the
......
......@@ -185,7 +185,7 @@ to run as if the display were a text-only terminal.
Run Emacs in @dfn{batch mode}, which means that the text being edited is
not displayed and the standard terminal interrupt characters such as
@kbd{C-z} and @kbd{C-c} continue to have their normal effect. Emacs in
batch mode outputs to @code{stderr} only what would normally be printed
batch mode outputs to @code{stderr} only what would normally be displayed
in the echo area under program control, and functions which would
normally read from the minibuffer take their input from @code{stdin}.
......
......@@ -83,8 +83,8 @@ preference---other users editing the same file might not want the same
minor modes you prefer.
The buffer-local minor modes include Abbrev mode, Auto Fill mode,
Auto Save mode, Font-Lock mode, ISO Accents mode, Outline minor mode,
Overwrite mode, and Binary Overwrite mode.
Auto Save mode, Font-Lock mode, Glasses mode, ISO Accents mode,
Outline minor mode, Overwrite mode, and Binary Overwrite mode.
Abbrev mode allows you to define abbreviations that automatically expand
as you type them. For example, @samp{amd} might expand to @samp{abbrev
......@@ -1176,7 +1176,7 @@ to execute the macro. The macro name is a Lisp symbol, and defining it in
this way makes it a valid command name for calling with @kbd{M-x} or for
binding a key to with @code{global-set-key} (@pxref{Keymaps}). If you
specify a name that has a prior definition other than another keyboard
macro, an error message is printed and nothing is changed.
macro, an error message is shown and nothing is changed.
@findex insert-kbd-macro
Once a macro has a command name, you can save its definition in a file.
......@@ -1965,7 +1965,7 @@ command. Here is the Lisp program to do this:
@end example
If the value of the @code{disabled} property is a string, that string
is included in the message printed when the command is used:
is included in the message displayed when the command is used:
@example
(put 'delete-region 'disabled
......
......@@ -75,7 +75,7 @@ would stand for the file name @file{/u/rms/gnu/new/foo}.
@findex cd
@findex pwd
The command @kbd{M-x pwd} prints the current buffer's default
The command @kbd{M-x pwd} displays the current buffer's default
directory, and the command @kbd{M-x cd} sets it (to a value read using
the minibuffer). A buffer's default directory changes only when the
@code{cd} command is used. A file-visiting buffer's default directory
......@@ -218,16 +218,16 @@ in the echo area.
another copy. It selects the existing buffer containing that file.
However, before doing so, it checks that the file itself has not changed
since you visited or saved it last. If the file has changed, a warning
message is printed. @xref{Interlocking,,Simultaneous Editing}.
message is shown. @xref{Interlocking,,Simultaneous Editing}.
@cindex maximum buffer size exceeded, error message
Since Emacs reads the visited file in its entirety, files whose size
is larger than the maximum Emacs buffer size (@pxref{Buffers}) cannot be
visited; if you try, Emacs will print an error message saying that the
visited; if you try, Emacs will display an error message saying that the
maximum buffer size has been exceeded.
@cindex creating files
What if you want to create a new file? Just visit it. Emacs prints
What if you want to create a new file? Just visit it. Emacs displays
@samp{(New file)} in the echo area, but in other respects behaves as if
you had visited an existing empty file. If you make any changes and
save them, the file is created.
......@@ -748,7 +748,7 @@ date of the existing file on disk to verify that it has not changed since the
file was last visited or saved. If the date does not match, it implies
that changes were made in the file in some other way, and these changes are
about to be lost if Emacs actually does save. To prevent this, Emacs
prints a warning message and asks for confirmation before saving.
displays a warning message and asks for confirmation before saving.
Occasionally you will know why the file was changed and know that it does
not matter; then you can answer @kbd{yes} and proceed. Otherwise, you should
cancel the save with @kbd{C-g} and investigate the situation.
......@@ -2642,7 +2642,7 @@ example of specifying a file name pattern:
C-x C-d /u2/emacs/src/*.c @key{RET}
@end example
Normally, @kbd{C-x C-d} prints a brief directory listing containing
Normally, @kbd{C-x C-d} displays a brief directory listing containing
just file names. A numeric argument (regardless of value) tells it to
make a verbose listing including sizes, dates, and owners (like
@samp{ls -l}).
......
......@@ -352,7 +352,7 @@ tell it to. @xref{Bugs}.
@item Echo Area
The echo area is the bottom line of the screen, used for echoing the
arguments to commands, for asking questions, and printing brief messages
arguments to commands, for asking questions, and showing brief messages
(including error messages). The messages are stored in the buffer
@samp{*Messages*} so you can review them later. @xref{Echo Area}.
......@@ -389,7 +389,7 @@ See `end of line.'
An error occurs when an Emacs command cannot execute in the current
circumstances. When an error occurs, execution of the command stops
(unless the command has been programmed to do otherwise) and Emacs
reports the error by printing an error message (q.v.@:). Type-ahead
reports the error by displaying an error message (q.v.@:). Type-ahead
is discarded. Then Emacs is ready to read another editing command.
@item Error Message
......@@ -549,7 +549,7 @@ listings of text in Emacs buffers. @xref{Hardcopy}.
command does. @xref{Help}.
@item Help Echo
Help echo is a short message printed in the echo area when the mouse
Help echo is a short message displayed in the echo area when the mouse
pointer is located on portions of display that require some
explanations. Emacs displays help echo for menu items, parts of the
mode line, tool-bar buttons, etc. On graphics displays, the messages
......@@ -894,7 +894,7 @@ The Emacs kill commands set the primary selection and the yank command
uses the primary selection when appropriate. @xref{Killing}.
@item Prompt
A prompt is text printed to ask the user for input. Displaying a prompt
A prompt is text used to ask the user for input. Displaying a prompt
is called prompting. Emacs prompts always appear in the echo area
(q.v.@:). One kind of prompting happens when the minibuffer is used to
read an argument (@pxref{Minibuffer}); the echoing which happens when
......
......@@ -185,8 +185,8 @@ programming language you are editing (@code{info-lookup-symbol}).
@findex describe-key-briefly
The most basic @kbd{C-h} options are @kbd{C-h c}
(@code{describe-key-briefly}) and @w{@kbd{C-h k}} (@code{describe-key}).
@kbd{C-h c @var{key}} prints in the echo area the name of the command
that @var{key} is bound to. For example, @kbd{C-h c C-f} prints
@kbd{C-h c @var{key}} displays in the echo area the name of the command
that @var{key} is bound to. For example, @kbd{C-h c C-f} displays
@samp{forward-char}. Since command names are chosen to describe what
the commands do, this is a good way to get a very brief description of
what @var{key} does.
......@@ -246,7 +246,7 @@ f} command, then go on editing.
@kindex C-h w
@findex where-is
@kbd{C-h w @var{command} @key{RET}} tells you what keys are bound to
@var{command}. It prints a list of the keys in the echo area. If it
@var{command}. It displays a list of the keys in the echo area. If it
says the command is not on any key, you must use @kbd{M-x} to run it.
@kbd{C-h w} runs the command @code{where-is}.
......@@ -482,7 +482,7 @@ mode.
@kindex C-h l
@findex view-lossage
If something surprising happens, and you are not sure what commands you
typed, use @kbd{C-h l} (@code{view-lossage}). @kbd{C-h l} prints the last
typed, use @kbd{C-h l} (@code{view-lossage}). @kbd{C-h l} displays the last
100 command characters you typed in. If you see commands that you don't
know, you can use @kbd{C-h c} to find out what they do.
......@@ -490,7 +490,7 @@ know, you can use @kbd{C-h c} to find out what they do.
@findex describe-mode
Emacs has numerous major modes, each of which redefines a few keys and
makes a few other changes in how editing works. @kbd{C-h m}
(@code{describe-mode}) prints documentation on the current major mode,
(@code{describe-mode}) displays documentation on the current major mode,
which normally describes all the commands that are changed in this
mode.
......@@ -551,6 +551,6 @@ various situations with solutions or workarounds in many cases.
When a region of text is ``active,'' so that you can select it with
the mouse or a key like @kbd{RET}, it often has associated help text.
Areas of the mode line are examples. This help will normally be
printed in the echo area when you move point into the active text. In
shown in the echo area when you move point into the active text. In
a window system you can display the help text as a ``tooltip''
(sometimes known as ``balloon help''). @xref{Tooltips}.
......@@ -46,10 +46,10 @@ while. It comes back after a few seconds, or as soon as you type
anything.
@item
If in the minibuffer you use a command whose purpose is to print a
message in the echo area, such as @kbd{C-x =}, the message is printed
normally, and the minibuffer is hidden for a while. It comes back
after a few seconds, or as soon as you type anything.
If in the minibuffer you use a command whose purpose is to display a
message in the echo area, such as @kbd{C-x =}, the message hides the
minibuffer for a while. The minibuffer contents come back after a few
seconds, or as soon as you type anything.
@item
Echoing of keystrokes does not take place while the minibuffer is in
......@@ -254,7 +254,7 @@ Complete the minibuffer text, but don't go beyond one word
Submit the text in the minibuffer as the argument, possibly completing
first as described below (@code{minibuffer-complete-and-exit}).
@item ?
Print a list of all possible completions of the text in the minibuffer
Display a list of all possible completions of the text in the minibuffer
(@code{minibuffer-list-completions}).
@end table
......
......@@ -123,18 +123,18 @@ feedback. You can change this behavior by setting a variable
(@pxref{Display Custom}).
@cindex error message in the echo area
If a command cannot be executed, it may print an @dfn{error message}
If a command cannot be executed, it may display an @dfn{error message}
in the echo area. Error messages are accompanied by beeping or by
flashing the screen. The error also discards any input you have typed
ahead.
Some commands print informative messages in the echo area. These
Some commands display informative messages in the echo area. These
messages look much like error messages, but they are not announced with
a beep and do not throw away input. Sometimes the message tells you
what the command has done, when this is not obvious from looking at the
text being edited. Sometimes the sole purpose of a command is to print
a message giving you specific information---for example, @kbd{C-x =}
prints a message describing the character position of point in the text
text being edited. Sometimes the sole purpose of a command is to show
you a message giving you specific information---for example, @kbd{C-x =}
displays a message describing the character position of point in the text
and its current column in the window. Commands that take a long time
often display messages ending in @samp{...} while they are working, and
add @samp{done} at the end when they are finished.
......
......@@ -358,7 +358,7 @@ the next page, and @minus{}1 means the previous one.
@kindex C-x l
@findex count-lines-page
The @kbd{C-x l} command (@code{count-lines-page}) is good for deciding
where to break a page in two. It prints in the echo area the total number
where to break a page in two. It displays in the echo area the total number
of lines in the current page, and then divides it up into those preceding
the current line and those following, as in
......@@ -1366,7 +1366,7 @@ text that belongs inside. Afterward, use the command @kbd{C-c @}}
@kindex C-j @r{(@TeX{} mode)}
There are two commands for checking the matching of braces. @kbd{C-j}
(@code{tex-terminate-paragraph}) checks the paragraph before point, and
inserts two newlines to start a new paragraph. It prints a message in
inserts two newlines to start a new paragraph. It outputs a message in
the echo area if any mismatch is found. @kbd{M-x tex-validate-region}
checks a region, paragraph by paragraph. The errors are listed in the
@samp{*Occur*} buffer, and you can use @kbd{C-c C-c} or @kbd{Mouse-2} in
......@@ -1664,7 +1664,7 @@ Move to the beginning of the next line that isn't an nroff command
@item M-p
Like @kbd{M-n} but move up (@code{backward-text-line}).
@item M-?
Prints in the echo area the number of text lines (lines that are not
Displays in the echo area the number of text lines (lines that are not
nroff commands) in the region (@code{count-text-lines}).
@end table
......
......@@ -699,7 +699,7 @@ to display your locale settings.
You can use the @kbd{M-!} command to execute these commands from
Emacs, and then copy the output from the @samp{*Messages*} buffer into
the bug report. Alternatively, @kbd{M-x getenv @key{RET} LC_ALL
@key{RET}} will print the value of @code{LC_ALL} in the echo area, and
@key{RET}} will display the value of @code{LC_ALL} in the echo area, and
you can copy its output from the @samp{*Messages*} buffer.
@item
......
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