Commit 1be208c2 authored by Paul Eggert's avatar Paul Eggert

Prefer straight quoting in some etc text files

These files are plain text and might be used by non-Emacs apps.
They’re mostly ASCII, so just use straight quotes.
parent 582222b5
......@@ -54,9 +54,9 @@ kick in, provided that you run under GDB.
** Getting control to the debugger
`Fsignal' is a very useful place to put a breakpoint in. All Lisp
'Fsignal' is a very useful place to put a breakpoint in. All Lisp
errors go through there. If you are only interested in errors that
would fire the debugger, breaking at `maybe_call_debugger' is useful.
would fire the debugger, breaking at 'maybe_call_debugger' is useful.
It is useful, when debugging, to have a guaranteed way to return to
the debugger at any time. When using X, this is easy: type C-z at the
......@@ -70,10 +70,10 @@ On modern POSIX systems, you can override that with this command:
handle SIGINT stop nopass
After this `handle' command, SIGINT will return control to GDB. If
you want the C-g to cause a QUIT within Emacs as well, omit the `nopass'.
After this 'handle' command, SIGINT will return control to GDB. If
you want the C-g to cause a QUIT within Emacs as well, omit the 'nopass'.
A technique that can work when `handle SIGINT' does not is to store
A technique that can work when 'handle SIGINT' does not is to store
the code for some character into the variable stop_character. Thus,
set stop_character = 29
......@@ -81,7 +81,7 @@ the code for some character into the variable stop_character. Thus,
makes Control-] (decimal code 29) the stop character.
Typing Control-] will cause immediate stop. You cannot
use the set command until the inferior process has been started.
Put a breakpoint early in `main', or suspend the Emacs,
Put a breakpoint early in 'main', or suspend the Emacs,
to get an opportunity to do the set command.
Another technique for get control to the debugger is to put a
......@@ -91,7 +91,7 @@ is Fredraw_display, which you can invoke at will interactively with
When Emacs is running in a terminal, it is sometimes useful to use a separate
terminal for the debug session. This can be done by starting Emacs as usual,
then attaching to it from gdb with the `attach' command which is explained in
then attaching to it from gdb with the 'attach' command which is explained in
the node "Attach" of the GDB manual.
On MS-Windows, you can start Emacs in its own separate terminal by
......@@ -103,36 +103,36 @@ setting the new-console option before running Emacs under GDB:
** Examining Lisp object values.
When you have a live process to debug, and it has not encountered a
fatal error, you can use the GDB command `pr'. First print the value
in the ordinary way, with the `p' command. Then type `pr' with no
fatal error, you can use the GDB command 'pr'. First print the value
in the ordinary way, with the 'p' command. Then type 'pr' with no
arguments. This calls a subroutine which uses the Lisp printer.
You can also use `pp value' to print the emacs value directly.
You can also use 'pp value' to print the emacs value directly.
To see the current value of a Lisp Variable, use `pv variable'.
To see the current value of a Lisp Variable, use 'pv variable'.
Note: It is not a good idea to try `pr', `pp', or `pv' if you know that Emacs
Note: It is not a good idea to try 'pr', 'pp', or 'pv' if you know that Emacs
is in deep trouble: its stack smashed (e.g., if it encountered SIGSEGV
due to stack overflow), or crucial data structures, such as `obarray',
corrupted, etc. In such cases, the Emacs subroutine called by `pr'
due to stack overflow), or crucial data structures, such as 'obarray',
corrupted, etc. In such cases, the Emacs subroutine called by 'pr'
might make more damage, like overwrite some data that is important for
debugging the original problem.
Also, on some systems it is impossible to use `pr' if you stopped
Emacs while it was inside `select'. This is in fact what happens if
Also, on some systems it is impossible to use 'pr' if you stopped
Emacs while it was inside 'select'. This is in fact what happens if
you stop Emacs while it is waiting. In such a situation, don't try to
use `pr'. Instead, use `s' to step out of the system call. Then
Emacs will be between instructions and capable of handling `pr'.
use 'pr'. Instead, use 's' to step out of the system call. Then
Emacs will be between instructions and capable of handling 'pr'.
If you can't use `pr' command, for whatever reason, you can use the
`xpr' command to print out the data type and value of the last data
If you can't use 'pr' command, for whatever reason, you can use the
'xpr' command to print out the data type and value of the last data
value, For example:
p it->object
xpr
You may also analyze data values using lower-level commands. Use the
`xtype' command to print out the data type of the last data value.
'xtype' command to print out the data type of the last data value.
Once you know the data type, use the command that corresponds to that
type. Here are these commands:
......@@ -181,20 +181,20 @@ Then Emacs hits the breakpoint:
[...]
}
Now we can use `pr' to print the frame parameters:
Now we can use 'pr' to print the frame parameters:
(gdb) pp $->param_alist
((background-mode . light) (display-type . color) [...])
The Emacs C code heavily uses macros defined in lisp.h. So suppose
we want the address of the l-value expression near the bottom of
`add_command_key' from keyboard.c:
'add_command_key' from keyboard.c:
XVECTOR (this_command_keys)->contents[this_command_key_count++] = key;
XVECTOR is a macro, so GDB only knows about it if Emacs has been compiled with
preprocessor macro information. GCC provides this if you specify the options
`-gdwarf-N' (where N is 2 or higher) and `-g3'. In this case, GDB can
'-gdwarf-N' (where N is 2 or higher) and '-g3'. In this case, GDB can
evaluate expressions like "p XVECTOR (this_command_keys)".
When this information isn't available, you can use the xvector command in GDB
......@@ -210,20 +210,20 @@ to get the same result. Here is how:
(gdb) p &$
$4 = (int *) 0x411008
Here's a related example of macros and the GDB `define' command.
There are many Lisp vectors such as `recent_keys', which contains the
Here's a related example of macros and the GDB 'define' command.
There are many Lisp vectors such as 'recent_keys', which contains the
last 300 keystrokes. We can print this Lisp vector
p recent_keys
pr
But this may be inconvenient, since `recent_keys' is much more verbose
than `C-h l'. We might want to print only the last 10 elements of
this vector. `recent_keys' is updated in keyboard.c by the command
But this may be inconvenient, since 'recent_keys' is much more verbose
than 'C-h l'. We might want to print only the last 10 elements of
this vector. 'recent_keys' is updated in keyboard.c by the command
XVECTOR (recent_keys)->contents[recent_keys_index] = c;
So we define a GDB command `xvector-elts', so the last 10 keystrokes
So we define a GDB command 'xvector-elts', so the last 10 keystrokes
are printed by
xvector-elts recent_keys recent_keys_index 10
......@@ -242,15 +242,15 @@ where you can define xvector-elts as follows:
document xvector-elts
Prints a range of elements of a Lisp vector.
xvector-elts v n i
prints `i' elements of the vector `v' ending at the index `n'.
prints 'i' elements of the vector 'v' ending at the index 'n'.
end
** Getting Lisp-level backtrace information within GDB
The most convenient way is to use the `xbacktrace' command. This
The most convenient way is to use the 'xbacktrace' command. This
shows the names of the Lisp functions that are currently active.
If that doesn't work (e.g., because the `backtrace_list' structure is
If that doesn't work (e.g., because the 'backtrace_list' structure is
corrupted), type "bt" at the GDB prompt, to produce the C-level
backtrace, and look for stack frames that call Ffuncall. Select them
one by one in GDB, by typing "up N", where N is the appropriate number
......@@ -291,25 +291,25 @@ some redisplay optimizations produce wrong results. (You know that redisplay
optimizations might be involved if "M-x redraw-display RET", or even just
typing "M-x", causes Emacs to correct the bad display.) Since the cursor
blinking feature triggers periodic redisplay cycles, we recommend disabling
`blink-cursor-mode' before invoking `trace-redisplay', so that you have less
'blink-cursor-mode' before invoking 'trace-redisplay', so that you have less
clutter in the trace. You can also have up to 30 last trace messages dumped to
standard error by invoking the `dump-redisplay-history' command.
standard error by invoking the 'dump-redisplay-history' command.
To find the code paths which were taken by the display engine, search xdisp.c
for the trace messages you see.
The command `dump-glyph-matrix' is useful for producing on standard error
The command 'dump-glyph-matrix' is useful for producing on standard error
stream a full dump of the selected window's glyph matrix. See the function's
doc string for more details. If you are debugging redisplay issues in
text-mode frames, you may find the command `dump-frame-glyph-matrix' useful.
text-mode frames, you may find the command 'dump-frame-glyph-matrix' useful.
Other commands useful for debugging redisplay are `dump-glyph-row' and
`dump-tool-bar-row'.
Other commands useful for debugging redisplay are 'dump-glyph-row' and
'dump-tool-bar-row'.
If you run Emacs under GDB, you can print the contents of any glyph matrix by
just calling that function with the matrix as its argument. For example, the
following command will print the contents of the current matrix of the window
whose pointer is in `w':
whose pointer is in 'w':
(gdb) p dump_glyph_matrix (w->current_matrix, 2)
......@@ -321,51 +321,51 @@ disabled. Configuring Emacs with --enable-checking='yes,glyphs' enables it.
Building Emacs like that activates many assertions which scrutinize
display code operation more than Emacs does normally. (To see the
code which tests these assertions, look for calls to the `eassert'
code which tests these assertions, look for calls to the 'eassert'
macros.) Any assertion that is reported to fail should be investigated.
When you debug display problems running emacs under X, you can use
the `ff' command to flush all pending display updates to the screen.
the 'ff' command to flush all pending display updates to the screen.
The src/.gdbinit file defines many useful commands for dumping redisplay
related data structures in a terse and user-friendly format:
`ppt' prints value of PT, narrowing, and gap in current buffer.
`pit' dumps the current display iterator `it'.
`pwin' dumps the current window 'win'.
`prow' dumps the current glyph_row `row'.
`pg' dumps the current glyph `glyph'.
`pgi' dumps the next glyph.
`pgrow' dumps all glyphs in current glyph_row `row'.
`pcursor' dumps current output_cursor.
'ppt' prints value of PT, narrowing, and gap in current buffer.
'pit' dumps the current display iterator 'it'.
'pwin' dumps the current window 'win'.
'prow' dumps the current glyph_row 'row'.
'pg' dumps the current glyph 'glyph'.
'pgi' dumps the next glyph.
'pgrow' dumps all glyphs in current glyph_row 'row'.
'pcursor' dumps current output_cursor.
The above commands also exist in a version with an `x' suffix which takes an
object of the relevant type as argument. For example, `pgrowx' dumps all
glyphs in its argument, which must be of type `struct glyph_row'.
The above commands also exist in a version with an 'x' suffix which takes an
object of the relevant type as argument. For example, 'pgrowx' dumps all
glyphs in its argument, which must be of type 'struct glyph_row'.
Since redisplay is performed by Emacs very frequently, you need to place your
breakpoints cleverly to avoid hitting them all the time, when the issue you are
debugging did not (yet) happen. Here are some useful techniques for that:
. Put a breakpoint at `Fredraw_display' before running Emacs. Then do
. Put a breakpoint at 'Fredraw_display' before running Emacs. Then do
whatever is required to reproduce the bad display, and invoke "M-x
redraw-display". The debugger will kick in, and you can set or enable
breakpoints in strategic places, knowing that the bad display will be
redrawn from scratch.
. For debugging incorrect cursor position, a good place to put a breakpoint is
in `set_cursor_from_row'. The first time this function is called as part of
`redraw-display', Emacs is redrawing the minibuffer window, which is usually
in 'set_cursor_from_row'. The first time this function is called as part of
'redraw-display', Emacs is redrawing the minibuffer window, which is usually
not what you want; type "continue" to get to the call you want. In general,
always make sure `set_cursor_from_row' is called for the right window and
always make sure 'set_cursor_from_row' is called for the right window and
buffer by examining the value of w->contents: it should be the buffer whose
display you are debugging.
. `set_cursor_from_row' is also a good place to look at the contents of a
screen line (a.k.a. "glyph row"), by means of the `pgrow' GDB command. Of
. 'set_cursor_from_row' is also a good place to look at the contents of a
screen line (a.k.a. "glyph row"), by means of the 'pgrow' GDB command. Of
course, you need first to make sure the cursor is on the screen line which
you want to investigate. If you have set a breakpoint in `Fredraw_display',
as advised above, move cursor to that line before invoking `redraw-display'.
you want to investigate. If you have set a breakpoint in 'Fredraw_display',
as advised above, move cursor to that line before invoking 'redraw-display'.
. If the problem happens only at some specific buffer position or for some
specific rarely-used character, you can make your breakpoints conditional on
......@@ -383,14 +383,14 @@ debugging did not (yet) happen. Here are some useful techniques for that:
. You can also make the breakpoints conditional on what object is being used
for producing glyphs for display. The it->method member has the value
GET_FROM_BUFFER for displaying buffer contents, GET_FROM_STRING for
displaying a Lisp string (e.g., a `display' property or an overlay string),
GET_FROM_IMAGE for displaying an image, etc. See `enum it_method' in
displaying a Lisp string (e.g., a 'display' property or an overlay string),
GET_FROM_IMAGE for displaying an image, etc. See 'enum it_method' in
dispextern.h for the full list of values.
** Following longjmp call.
Recent versions of glibc (2.4+?) encrypt stored values for setjmp/longjmp which
prevents GDB from being able to follow a longjmp call using `next'. To
prevents GDB from being able to follow a longjmp call using 'next'. To
disable this protection you need to set the environment variable
LD_POINTER_GUARD to 0.
......@@ -400,11 +400,11 @@ Debugging with GDB in Emacs offers some advantages over the command line (See
the GDB Graphical Interface node of the Emacs manual). There are also some
features available just for debugging Emacs:
1) The command gud-pp is available on the tool bar (the `pp' icon) and
1) The command gud-pp is available on the tool bar (the 'pp' icon) and
allows the user to print the s-expression of the variable at point,
in the GUD buffer.
2) Pressing `p' on a component of a watch expression that is a lisp object
2) Pressing 'p' on a component of a watch expression that is a lisp object
in the speedbar prints its s-expression in the GUD buffer.
3) The STOP button on the tool bar is adjusted so that it sends SIGTSTP
......@@ -415,11 +415,11 @@ features available just for debugging Emacs:
** Debugging what happens while preloading and dumping Emacs
Debugging `temacs' is useful when you want to establish whether a
problem happens in an undumped Emacs. To run `temacs' under a
debugger, type "gdb temacs", then start it with `r -batch -l loadup'.
Debugging 'temacs' is useful when you want to establish whether a
problem happens in an undumped Emacs. To run 'temacs' under a
debugger, type "gdb temacs", then start it with 'r -batch -l loadup'.
If you need to debug what happens during dumping, start it with `r -batch -l
If you need to debug what happens during dumping, start it with 'r -batch -l
loadup dump' instead. For debugging the bootstrap dumping, use "loadup
bootstrap" instead of "loadup dump".
......@@ -444,7 +444,7 @@ option, like this:
emacs -xrm "emacs.synchronous: true"
Setting a breakpoint in the function `x_error_quitter' and looking at
Setting a breakpoint in the function 'x_error_quitter' and looking at
the backtrace when Emacs stops inside that function will show what
code causes the X protocol errors.
......@@ -455,25 +455,25 @@ procedure:
- Run Emacs under a debugger and put a breakpoint inside the
primitive function which, when called from Lisp, triggers the X
protocol errors. For example, if the errors happen when you
delete a frame, put a breakpoint inside `Fdelete_frame'.
delete a frame, put a breakpoint inside 'Fdelete_frame'.
- When the breakpoint breaks, step through the code, looking for
calls to X functions (the ones whose names begin with "X" or
"Xt" or "Xm").
- Insert calls to `XSync' before and after each call to the X
- Insert calls to 'XSync' before and after each call to the X
functions, like this:
XSync (f->output_data.x->display_info->display, 0);
where `f' is the pointer to the `struct frame' of the selected
where 'f' is the pointer to the 'struct frame' of the selected
frame, normally available via XFRAME (selected_frame). (Most
functions which call X already have some variable that holds the
pointer to the frame, perhaps called `f' or `sf', so you shouldn't
pointer to the frame, perhaps called 'f' or 'sf', so you shouldn't
need to compute it.)
If your debugger can call functions in the program being debugged,
you should be able to issue the calls to `XSync' without recompiling
you should be able to issue the calls to 'XSync' without recompiling
Emacs. For example, with GDB, just type:
call XSync (f->output_data.x->display_info->display, 0)
......@@ -484,8 +484,8 @@ procedure:
Either way, systematically step through the code and issue these
calls until you find the first X function called by Emacs after
which a call to `XSync' winds up in the function
`x_error_quitter'. The first X function call for which this
which a call to 'XSync' winds up in the function
'x_error_quitter'. The first X function call for which this
happens is the one that generated the X protocol error.
- You should now look around this offending X call and try to figure
......@@ -506,7 +506,7 @@ to start debugging.
** If the symptom of the bug is that Emacs fails to respond
Don't assume Emacs is `hung'--it may instead be in an infinite loop.
Don't assume Emacs is 'hung'--it may instead be in an infinite loop.
To find out which, make the problem happen under GDB and stop Emacs
once it is not responding. (If Emacs is using X Windows directly, you
can stop Emacs by typing C-z at the GDB job. On MS-Windows, run Emacs
......@@ -514,8 +514,8 @@ as usual, and then attach GDB to it -- that will usually interrupt
whatever Emacs is doing and let you perform the steps described
below.)
Then try stepping with `step'. If Emacs is hung, the `step' command
won't return. If it is looping, `step' will return.
Then try stepping with 'step'. If Emacs is hung, the 'step' command
won't return. If it is looping, 'step' will return.
If this shows Emacs is hung in a system call, stop it again and
examine the arguments of the call. If you report the bug, it is very
......@@ -524,19 +524,19 @@ what the arguments are.
If Emacs is in an infinite loop, try to determine where the loop
starts and ends. The easiest way to do this is to use the GDB command
`finish'. Each time you use it, Emacs resumes execution until it
exits one stack frame. Keep typing `finish' until it doesn't
'finish'. Each time you use it, Emacs resumes execution until it
exits one stack frame. Keep typing 'finish' until it doesn't
return--that means the infinite loop is in the stack frame which you
just tried to finish.
Stop Emacs again, and use `finish' repeatedly again until you get back
to that frame. Then use `next' to step through that frame. By
Stop Emacs again, and use 'finish' repeatedly again until you get back
to that frame. Then use 'next' to step through that frame. By
stepping, you will see where the loop starts and ends. Also, examine
the data being used in the loop and try to determine why the loop does
not exit when it should.
On GNU and Unix systems, you can also trying sending Emacs SIGUSR2,
which, if `debug-on-event' has its default value, will cause Emacs to
which, if 'debug-on-event' has its default value, will cause Emacs to
attempt to break it out of its current loop and into the Lisp
debugger. This feature is useful when a C-level debugger is not
conveniently available.
......@@ -572,7 +572,7 @@ in such an extremity. Do
17:i
:r -l loadup (or whatever)
It is necessary to refer to the file `nmout' to convert
It is necessary to refer to the file 'nmout' to convert
numeric addresses into symbols and vice versa.
It is useful to be running under a window system.
......@@ -591,7 +591,7 @@ screen. To make these records, do
The dribble file contains all characters read by Emacs from the
terminal, and the termscript file contains all characters it sent to
the terminal. The use of the directory `~/' prevents interference
the terminal. The use of the directory '~/' prevents interference
with any other user.
If you have irreproducible display problems, put those two expressions
......@@ -600,7 +600,7 @@ you were running, kill it, and rename the two files. Then you can start
another Emacs without clobbering those files, and use it to examine them.
An easy way to see if too much text is being redrawn on a terminal is to
evaluate `(setq inverse-video t)' before you try the operation you think
evaluate '(setq inverse-video t)' before you try the operation you think
will cause too much redrawing. This doesn't refresh the screen, so only
newly drawn text is in inverse video.
......@@ -608,7 +608,7 @@ newly drawn text is in inverse video.
If you encounter bugs whereby Emacs built with LessTif grabs all mouse
and keyboard events, or LessTif menus behave weirdly, it might be
helpful to set the `DEBUGSOURCES' and `DEBUG_FILE' environment
helpful to set the 'DEBUGSOURCES' and 'DEBUG_FILE' environment
variables, so that one can see what LessTif was doing at this point.
For instance
......@@ -617,7 +617,7 @@ For instance
emacs &
causes LessTif to print traces from the three named source files to a
file in `/usr/tmp' (that file can get pretty large). The above should
file in '/usr/tmp' (that file can get pretty large). The above should
be typed at the shell prompt before invoking Emacs, as shown by the
last line above.
......@@ -628,29 +628,29 @@ the machine where you started GDB and use the debugger from there.
** Debugging problems which happen in GC
The array `last_marked' (defined on alloc.c) can be used to display up
The array 'last_marked' (defined on alloc.c) can be used to display up
to 500 last objects marked by the garbage collection process.
Whenever the garbage collector marks a Lisp object, it records the
pointer to that object in the `last_marked' array, which is maintained
as a circular buffer. The variable `last_marked_index' holds the
index into the `last_marked' array one place beyond where the pointer
pointer to that object in the 'last_marked' array, which is maintained
as a circular buffer. The variable 'last_marked_index' holds the
index into the 'last_marked' array one place beyond where the pointer
to the very last marked object is stored.
The single most important goal in debugging GC problems is to find the
Lisp data structure that got corrupted. This is not easy since GC
changes the tag bits and relocates strings which make it hard to look
at Lisp objects with commands such as `pr'. It is sometimes necessary
at Lisp objects with commands such as 'pr'. It is sometimes necessary
to convert Lisp_Object variables into pointers to C struct's manually.
Use the `last_marked' array and the source to reconstruct the sequence
Use the 'last_marked' array and the source to reconstruct the sequence
that objects were marked. In general, you need to correlate the
values recorded in the `last_marked' array with the corresponding
values recorded in the 'last_marked' array with the corresponding
stack frames in the backtrace, beginning with the innermost frame.
Some subroutines of `mark_object' are invoked recursively, others loop
Some subroutines of 'mark_object' are invoked recursively, others loop
over portions of the data structure and mark them as they go. By
looking at the code of those routines and comparing the frames in the
backtrace with the values in `last_marked', you will be able to find
connections between the values in `last_marked'. E.g., when GC finds
backtrace with the values in 'last_marked', you will be able to find
connections between the values in 'last_marked'. E.g., when GC finds
a cons cell, it recursively marks its car and its cdr. Similar things
happen with properties of symbols, elements of vectors, etc. Use
these connections to reconstruct the data structure that was being
......@@ -691,7 +691,7 @@ xterm window, then type these commands inside that window:
Let's say these commands print "/dev/ttyp4" and "xterm", respectively.
Now start Emacs (the normal, windowed-display session, i.e. without
the `-nw' option), and invoke "M-x gdb RET emacs RET" from there. Now
the '-nw' option), and invoke "M-x gdb RET emacs RET" from there. Now
type these commands at GDB's prompt:
(gdb) set args -nw -t /dev/ttyp4
......@@ -702,7 +702,7 @@ The debugged Emacs should now start in no-window mode with its display
directed to the xterm window you opened above.
Similar arrangement is possible on a character terminal by using the
`screen' package.
'screen' package.
On MS-Windows, you can start Emacs in its own separate terminal by
setting the new-console option before running Emacs under GDB:
......@@ -736,13 +736,13 @@ memory. Here are some of the changes you might find necessary:
- cd ..; src/temacs
(Note that this runs `temacs' instead of the usual `emacs' executable.
(Note that this runs 'temacs' instead of the usual 'emacs' executable.
This avoids problems with dumping Emacs mentioned above.)
Some malloc debugging libraries might print lots of false alarms for
bitfields used by Emacs in some data structures. If you want to get
rid of the false alarms, you will have to hack the definitions of
these data structures on the respective headers to remove the `:N'
these data structures on the respective headers to remove the ':N'
bitfield definitions (which will cause each such field to use a full
int).
......@@ -792,19 +792,19 @@ opened at Emacs' startup; this console window also shows the output of
'debug_print'.
For example, start and run Emacs in the debugger until it is waiting
for user input. Then click on the `Break' button in the debugger to
halt execution. Emacs should halt in `ZwUserGetMessage' waiting for
an input event. Use the `Call Stack' window to select the procedure
`w32_msp_pump' up the call stack (see below for why you have to do
for user input. Then click on the 'Break' button in the debugger to
halt execution. Emacs should halt in 'ZwUserGetMessage' waiting for
an input event. Use the 'Call Stack' window to select the procedure
'w32_msp_pump' up the call stack (see below for why you have to do
this). Open the QuickWatch window and enter
"debug_print(Vexec_path)". Evaluating this expression will then print
out the contents of the Lisp variable `exec-path'.
out the contents of the Lisp variable 'exec-path'.
If QuickWatch reports that the symbol is unknown, then check the call
stack in the `Call Stack' window. If the selected frame in the call
stack in the 'Call Stack' window. If the selected frame in the call
stack is not an Emacs procedure, then the debugger won't recognize
Emacs symbols. Instead, select a frame that is inside an Emacs
procedure and try using `debug_print' again.
procedure and try using 'debug_print' again.
If QuickWatch invokes debug_print but nothing happens, then check the
thread that is selected in the debugger. If the selected thread is
......
......@@ -7,7 +7,7 @@
-- --
----------------------------------------------------------------------
"Is it legal for a `struct interval' to have a total_length field of
"Is it legal for a 'struct interval' to have a total_length field of
zero?"
"We can't be arrested for it as far as I know, but it is definitely
invalid for an interval to have zero length."
......@@ -131,7 +131,7 @@ have escaped John's notice."
Re: patch for woman (woman-topic-at-point)
"Sorry for the long message. I wanted to make the problem clear
also for people not familiar with `woman'."
also for people not familiar with 'woman'."
"Most hackers, I take?
For a moment there I thought you had a patch that you could put on
a woman, and it would make her come right to the topic at point
......
......@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@ copy and change it--those freedoms are what "free software" means.
The precise conditions for copying and modification are stated in the
document "GNU General Public License," a copy of which is required to
be distributed with every copy of GNU Emacs. It is usually in a file
named `COPYING' in the same directory as this file. These conditions
named 'COPYING' in the same directory as this file. These conditions
are designed to make sure that everyone who has a copy of GNU Emacs
(including modified versions) has the freedom to redistribute and
change it.
......@@ -32,12 +32,12 @@ online store at http://shop.fsf.org.
Emacs has been run on GNU/Linux, FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD, and on many
Unix systems, on a variety of types of cpu, as well as on MSDOS,
Windows and MacOS. See the file `etc/MACHINES' in the Emacs
Windows and MacOS. See the file 'etc/MACHINES' in the Emacs
distribution for a full list of machines that GNU Emacs has been tested
on, with machine-specific installation notes and warnings.
GNU Emacs is distributed with no warranty (see the General Public
License for full details, in the file `COPYING' in this directory (see
License for full details, in the file 'COPYING' in this directory (see
above)), and neither I nor the Free Software Foundation promises any
kind of support or assistance to users. The foundation keeps a list
of people who are willing to offer support and assistance for hire.
......@@ -73,7 +73,7 @@ you can contribute.
Your donations will help to support the development of additional GNU
software. GNU/Linux systems (variants of GNU, based on the kernel
Linux) have millions of users, but there is still much to be done.
For more information on GNU, see the file `GNU' in this directory (see
For more information on GNU, see the file 'GNU' in this directory (see
above).
Richard M Stallman
......
......@@ -88,7 +88,7 @@ that match it, Emacs then looks for an tag whose implicit tag name
matches the request. etags.c uses implicit tag names when possible, in
order to reduce the size of the tags file.
An implicit tag name is deduced from the pattern by discarding the
last character if it is one of ` \f\t\n\r()=,;', then taking all the
last character if it is one of ' \f\t\n\r()=,;', then taking all the
rightmost consecutive characters in the pattern which are not one of
those.
......
......@@ -16,7 +16,7 @@ met:
contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived
from this software without specific prior written permission.
THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE REGENTS AND CONTRIBUTORS ``AS IS'' AND ANY
THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE REGENTS AND CONTRIBUTORS "AS IS" AND ANY
EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE
DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE REGENTS OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY
......
......@@ -10,12 +10,12 @@ Information about older releases, and platforms that are no longer
supported, has been removed. Consult older versions of this file if
you are interested in this information.
The `configure' script uses the configuration name, and the results of
The 'configure' script uses the configuration name, and the results of
testing the system, to decide which options to use in src/config.h and
elsewhere (eg Makefiles).
If you add support for a new configuration, add a section to this
file, and edit the `configure.ac' source as needed.
file, and edit the 'configure.ac' source as needed.
Some obsolete platforms are unsupported beginning with Emacs 23.1. See
the list at the end of this file.
......@@ -90,9 +90,9 @@ the list at the end of this file.
On Solaris, do not use /usr/ucb/cc. Use /opt/SUNWspro/bin/cc. Make
sure that /usr/ccs/bin and /opt/SUNWspro/bin are in your PATH before
/usr/ucb. (Most free software packages have the same requirement on
Solaris.) With this compiler, use `/opt/SUNWspro/bin/cc -E' as the
Solaris.) With this compiler, use '/opt/SUNWspro/bin/cc -E' as the
preprocessor. If this inserts extra whitespace into its output (see
the PROBLEMS file) then add the option `-Xs'.
the PROBLEMS file) then add the option '-Xs'.
To build a 64-bit Emacs (with larger maximum buffer size) on a
Solaris system which supports 64-bit executables, specify the -m64
......
......@@ -21,7 +21,7 @@ It's completely redundant now, as far as we know.
A typical error message might be something like
No fonts match `-*-fixed-medium-r-*--6-*-*-*-*-*-iso8859-1'
No fonts match -*-fixed-medium-r-*--6-*-*-*-*-*-iso8859-1
This happens because some X resource specifies a bad font family for
Emacs to use. The possible places where this specification might be are:
......@@ -85,7 +85,7 @@ This could happen if you compress the file lisp/subdirs.el. That file
tells Emacs what are the directories where it should look for Lisp
files. Emacs cannot work with subdirs.el compressed, since the
Auto-compress mode it needs for this will not be loaded until later,
when your .emacs file is processed. (The package `fontset.el' is
when your .emacs file is processed. (The package 'fontset.el' is
required to set up fonts used to display text on window systems, and
it's loaded very early in the startup procedure.)
......@@ -132,26 +132,26 @@ optimization. To do this, configure Emacs with
This is known to happen when Emacs is compiled with MinGW GCC 4.6.1
with the -O2 option (which is the default in the Windows build). The