Commit 1db81533 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

(Entering Emacs): Update rationale at start.

(Exiting): Treat iconifying on a par with suspension.
parent af1b4255
......@@ -40,11 +40,11 @@ the editor again. With these editors, it makes sense to use a
command-line argument to say which file to edit.
But starting a new Emacs each time you want to edit a different file
does not make sense. For one thing, this would be annoyingly slow.
For another, this would fail to take advantage of Emacs's ability to
visit more than one file in a single editing session. And it would
lose the other accumulated context, such as the kill ring, registers,
undo history, and mark ring.
does not make sense. This would fail to take advantage of Emacs's
ability to visit more than one file in a single editing session, and
it would lose the other accumulated context, such as the kill ring,
registers, undo history, and mark ring, that are useful for operating
on multiple files.
The recommended way to use GNU Emacs is to start it only once, just
after you log in, and do all your editing in the same Emacs session.
......@@ -71,13 +71,19 @@ information on editing files with Emacs from other programs.
@cindex leaving Emacs
@cindex quitting Emacs
There are two commands for exiting Emacs because there are two kinds
of exiting: @dfn{suspending} Emacs and @dfn{killing} Emacs.
There are two commands for exiting Emacs because there are three
kinds of exiting: @dfn{suspending} Emacs, @dfn{Iconifying} Emacs, and
@dfn{killing} Emacs.
@dfn{Suspending} means stopping Emacs temporarily and returning
control to its parent process (usually a shell), allowing you to resume
editing later in the same Emacs job, with the same buffers, same kill
ring, same undo history, and so on. This is the usual way to exit.
ring, same undo history, and so on. This is the usual way to exit Emacs
when running on a text terminal.
@dfn{Iconifying} means replacing the Emacs frame with a small box
somewhere on the screen. This is the usual way to exit Emacs when you're
using a graphics terminal.
@dfn{Killing} Emacs means destroying the Emacs job. You can run Emacs
again later, but you will get a fresh Emacs; there is no way to resume
......@@ -93,31 +99,33 @@ Kill Emacs (@code{save-buffers-kill-emacs}).
@kindex C-z
@findex suspend-emacs
To suspend Emacs, type @kbd{C-z} (@code{suspend-emacs}). This takes
you back to the shell from which you invoked Emacs. You can resume
Emacs with the shell command @command{%emacs} in most common shells.
On systems that do not support suspending programs, @kbd{C-z} starts
an inferior shell that communicates directly with the terminal.
Emacs waits until you exit the subshell. (The way to do that is
probably with @kbd{C-d} or @command{exit}, but it depends on which shell
you use.) The only way on these systems to get back to the shell from
which Emacs was run (to log out, for example) is to kill Emacs.
Suspending also fails if you run Emacs under a shell that doesn't
support suspending programs, even if the system itself does support it.
In such a case, you can set the variable @code{cannot-suspend} to a
non-@code{nil} value to force @kbd{C-z} to start an inferior shell.
To suspend or iconify Emacs, type @kbd{C-z} (@code{suspend-emacs}).
On text terminals, this suspends Emacs. On graphics terminals,
it iconifies the Emacs frame.
Suspending Emacs takes you back to the shell from which you invoked
Emacs. You can resume Emacs with the shell command @command{%emacs}
in most common shells. On systems that don't support suspending
programs, @kbd{C-z} starts an inferior shell that communicates
directly with the terminal. Emacs waits until you exit the subshell.
(The way to do that is probably with @kbd{C-d} or @command{exit}, but
it depends on which shell you use.) The only way on these systems to
get back to the shell from which Emacs was run (to log out, for
example) is to kill Emacs.
Suspending can fail if you run Emacs under a shell that doesn't
support suspending programs, even if the system itself does support
it. In such a case, you can set the variable @code{cannot-suspend} to
a non-@code{nil} value to force @kbd{C-z} to start an inferior shell.
(One might also describe Emacs's parent shell as ``inferior'' for
failing to support job control properly, but that is a matter of taste.)
When Emacs communicates directly with an X server and creates its own
dedicated X windows, @kbd{C-z} has a different meaning. Suspending an
application that uses its own X windows is not meaningful or useful.
Instead, @kbd{C-z} runs the command @code{iconify-or-deiconify-frame},
which temporarily iconifies (or ``minimizes'') the selected Emacs
frame (@pxref{Frames}). Then you can use the window manager to get
back to a shell window.
failing to support job control properly, but that is a matter of
taste.)
On graphics terminals, @kbd{C-z} has a different meaning: it runs
the command @code{iconify-or-deiconify-frame}, which temporarily
iconifies (or ``minimizes'') the selected Emacs frame
(@pxref{Frames}). Then you can use the window manager to get back to
a shell window.
@kindex C-x C-c
@findex save-buffers-kill-emacs
......
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