Commit 1dcac243 authored by Jay Belanger's avatar Jay Belanger

calc.texi (Simplification modes, Conversions)

(Operating on Selections, Basic Simplifications)
(Algebraic Simplifications):  Mention "basic" simplifications.
(Algebraic Entry): Remove mention of default simplifications.
parent 4939150c
2012-08-01 Jay Belanger <jay.p.belanger@gmail.com>
* calc.texi (Simplification modes): Mention "basic" simplification.
* calc.texi (Simplification modes, Conversions)
(Operating on Selections): Mention "basic" simplification.
(The Calc Mode Line): Mention the mode line display for Basic
simplification mode.
(Simplify Formulas): Refer to 'algebraic' rather than 'default'
......@@ -14,6 +15,7 @@
(Trigonometric/Hyperbolic Functions, Reducing and Mapping)
(Kinds of Declarations, Functions for Declarations): Mention
"algebraic simplifications" instead of `a s'.
(Algebraic Entry): Remove mention of default simplifications.
2012-07-30 Jay Belanger <jay.p.belanger@gmail.com>
......
......@@ -10123,7 +10123,7 @@ formula that goes onto the stack. (Thus @kbd{' pi @key{RET}} pushes
the variable @samp{pi}, but @kbd{' pi M-@key{RET}} pushes 3.1415.)
If you finish your algebraic entry by pressing @key{LFD} (or @kbd{C-j})
instead of @key{RET}, Calc disables the default simplifications
instead of @key{RET}, Calc disables simplification
(as if by @kbd{m O}; @pxref{Simplification Modes}) while the entry
is being pushed on the stack. Thus @kbd{' 1+2 @key{RET}} pushes 3
on the stack, but @kbd{' 1+2 @key{LFD}} pushes the formula @expr{1+2};
......@@ -12613,12 +12613,12 @@ fast algebraic simplifications such as @expr{a+0} to @expr{a}, and
@kindex m B
@pindex calc-bin-simplify-mode
The @kbd{m B} (@code{calc-bin-simplify-mode}) mode applies the limited
The @kbd{m B} (@code{calc-bin-simplify-mode}) mode applies the basic
simplifications to a result and then, if the result is an integer,
uses the @kbd{b c} (@code{calc-clip}) command to clip the integer according
to the current binary word size. @xref{Binary Functions}. Real numbers
are rounded to the nearest integer and then clipped; other kinds of
results (after the default simplifications) are left alone.
results (after the basic simplifications) are left alone.
@kindex m A
@pindex calc-alg-simplify-mode
......@@ -16714,10 +16714,10 @@ produced!) Integers and fractions are generally unaffected by this
operation. Vectors and formulas are cleaned by cleaning each component
number (i.e., pervasively).
If the simplification mode is set below the limited level, it is raised
to the limited level for the purposes of this command. Thus, @kbd{c c}
applies the limited simplifications even if their automatic application
is disabled. @xref{Simplification Modes}.
If the simplification mode is set below basic simplification, it is raised
for the purposes of this command. Thus, @kbd{c c} applies the basic
simplifications even if their automatic application is disabled.
@xref{Simplification Modes}.
@cindex Roundoff errors, correcting
A numeric prefix argument to @kbd{c c} sets the floating-point precision
......@@ -22124,7 +22124,7 @@ now to take the cosine of the selected part.)
@kindex j v
@pindex calc-sel-evaluate
The @kbd{j v} (@code{calc-sel-evaluate}) command performs the
limited simplifications on the selected sub-formula.
basic simplifications on the selected sub-formula.
These simplifications would normally be done automatically
on all results, but may have been partially inhibited by
previous selection-related operations, or turned off altogether
......@@ -22412,14 +22412,14 @@ a serious user of Calc's algebra facilities.
As well as the simplifications described here, if you have stored
any rewrite rules in the variable @code{EvalRules} then these rules
will also be applied before any built-in default simplifications.
will also be applied before any of the basic simplifications.
@xref{Automatic Rewrites}, for details.
@tex
\bigskip
@end tex
And now, on with the limited set of simplifications:
And now, on with the basic simplifications:
Arithmetic operators like @kbd{+} and @kbd{*} always take two
arguments in Calc's internal form. Sums and products of three or
......@@ -22737,7 +22737,7 @@ of terms including non-adjacent ones.
Products are sorted into a canonical order using the commutative
law. For example, @expr{b c a} is commuted to @expr{a b c}.
This allows easier comparison of products; for example, the limited
This allows easier comparison of products; for example, the basic
simplifications will not change @expr{x y + y x} to @expr{2 x y},
but the algebraic simplifications; it first rewrites the sum to
@expr{x y + x y} which can then be recognized as a sum of identical
......@@ -22796,10 +22796,10 @@ simplified successfully.
Integer powers of the variable @code{i} are simplified according
to the identity @expr{i^2 = -1}. If you store a new value other
than the complex number @expr{(0,1)} in @code{i}, this simplification
will no longer occur. This is not done by the limited
will no longer occur. This is not done by the basic
simplifications; in case someone (unwisely) wants to use the name
@code{i} for a variable unrelated to complex numbers, they can use
limited simplifications.
basic simplification mode.
Square roots of integer or rational arguments are simplified in
several ways. (Note that these will be left unevaluated only in
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