Commit 1f7ebf7c authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

Minor clarifications.

parent cd30a00e
......@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@ Emacs operates its own X windows. You can begin typing Emacs commands
as soon as you direct your keyboard input to the Emacs frame.
@vindex initial-major-mode
When Emacs starts up, it makes a buffer named @samp{*scratch*}.
When Emacs starts up, it creates a buffer named @samp{*scratch*}.
That's the buffer you start out in. The @samp{*scratch*} buffer uses Lisp
Interaction mode; you can use it to type Lisp expressions and evaluate
them, or you can ignore that capability and simply doodle. (You can
......@@ -106,19 +106,20 @@ failing to support job control properly, but that is a matter of taste.)
dedicated X windows, @kbd{C-z} has a different meaning. Suspending an
application that uses its own X windows is not meaningful or useful.
Instead, @kbd{C-z} runs the command @code{iconify-or-deiconify-frame},
which temporarily closes up the selected Emacs frame (@pxref{Frames}).
The way to get back to a shell window is with the window manager.
which temporarily iconifies (or ``minimizes'') the selected Emacs
frame (@pxref{Frames}). Then you can use the window manager to get
back to a shell window.
@kindex C-x C-c
@findex save-buffers-kill-emacs
To kill Emacs, type @kbd{C-x C-c} (@code{save-buffers-kill-emacs}). A
two-character key is used for this to make it harder to type. This
command first offers to save any modified file-visiting buffers. If you
do not save them all, it asks for reconfirmation with @kbd{yes} before
killing Emacs, since any changes not saved will be lost forever. Also,
if any subprocesses are still running, @kbd{C-x C-c} asks for
confirmation about them, since killing Emacs will kill the subprocesses
immediately.
To exit and kill Emacs, type @kbd{C-x C-c}
(@code{save-buffers-kill-emacs}). A two-character key is used for
this to make it harder to type by accident. This command first offers
to save any modified file-visiting buffers. If you do not save them
all, it asks for reconfirmation with @kbd{yes} before killing Emacs,
since any changes not saved will be lost forever. Also, if any
subprocesses are still running, @kbd{C-x C-c} asks for confirmation
about them, since killing Emacs will also kill the subprocesses.
@vindex confirm-kill-emacs
If the value of the variable @code{confirm-kill-emacs} is
......@@ -129,10 +130,10 @@ function to use as the value of @code{confirm-kill-emacs} is the
function @code{yes-or-no-p}. The default value of
@code{confirm-kill-emacs} is @code{nil}.
There is no way to restart an Emacs session once you have killed it.
There is no way to resume an Emacs session once you have killed it.
You can, however, arrange for Emacs to record certain session
information, such as which files are visited, when you kill it, so that
the next time you restart Emacs it will try to visit the same files and
information when you kill it, such as which files are visited, so that
the next time you start Emacs it will try to visit the same files and
so on. @xref{Saving Emacs Sessions}.
The operating system usually listens for certain special characters
......
......@@ -81,12 +81,11 @@ given at the end of a line, rather than transposing the last character of
the line with the newline, which would be useless, @kbd{C-t} transposes the
last two characters on the line. So, if you catch your transposition error
right away, you can fix it with just a @kbd{C-t}. If you don't catch it so
fast, you must move the cursor back to between the two transposed
characters. If you transposed a space with the last character of the word
before it, the word motion commands are a good way of getting there.
Otherwise, a reverse search (@kbd{C-r}) is often the best way.
@xref{Search}.
fast, you must move the cursor back between the two transposed
characters before you type @kbd{C-t}. If you transposed a space with
the last character of the word before it, the word motion commands are
a good way of getting there. Otherwise, a reverse search (@kbd{C-r})
is often the best way. @xref{Search}.
@kindex C-x C-t
@findex transpose-lines
......@@ -211,7 +210,7 @@ you various alternatives for what to do about it.
To check the entire current buffer, use @kbd{M-x ispell-buffer}. Use
@kbd{M-x ispell-region} to check just the current region. To check
spelling in an email message you are writing, use @kbd{M-x
ispell-message}; that checks the whole buffer, but does not check
ispell-message}; that command checks the whole buffer, except for
material that is indented or appears to be cited from other messages.
@findex ispell
......@@ -223,7 +222,8 @@ spell-checks the current buffer.
Each time these commands encounter an incorrect word, they ask you
what to do. They display a list of alternatives, usually including
several ``near-misses''---words that are close to the word being
checked. Then you must type a character. Here are the valid responses:
checked. Then you must type a single-character response. Here are
the valid responses:
@table @kbd
@item @key{SPC}
......@@ -252,7 +252,7 @@ editing session and for this buffer.
@item i
Insert this word in your private dictionary file so that Ispell will
consider it correct it from now on, even in future sessions.
consider it correct from now on, even in future sessions.
@item u
Insert the lower-case version of this word in your private dic@-tion@-ary
......@@ -264,8 +264,8 @@ information.
@item l @var{word} @key{RET}
Look in the dictionary for words that match @var{word}. These words
become the new list of ``near-misses''; you can select one of them to
replace with by typing a digit. You can use @samp{*} in @var{word} as a
become the new list of ``near-misses''; you can select one of them as
the replacement by typing a digit. You can use @samp{*} in @var{word} as a
wildcard.
@item C-g
......
......@@ -90,7 +90,7 @@ Insert text from register @var{r} (@code{insert-register}).
@kbd{C-x r s @var{r}} stores a copy of the text of the region into
the register named @var{r}. @kbd{C-u C-x r s @var{r}}, the same
command with a numeric argument, deletes the text from the buffer as
well.
well; you can think of this as ``moving'' the region text into the register.
@kbd{C-x r i @var{r}} inserts in the buffer the text from register
@var{r}. Normally it leaves point before the text and places the mark
......@@ -247,8 +247,8 @@ to the position of the bookmark at the same time.
To display a list of all your bookmarks in a separate buffer, type
@kbd{C-x r l} (@code{list-bookmarks}). If you switch to that buffer,
you can use it to edit your bookmark definitions or annotate the
bookmarks. Type @kbd{C-h m} in that buffer for more information about
its special editing commands.
bookmarks. Type @kbd{C-h m} in the bookmark buffer for more
information about its special editing commands.
When you kill Emacs, Emacs offers to save your bookmark values in your
default bookmark file, @file{~/.emacs.bmk}, if you have changed any
......
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