Commit 2186d13f authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris
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(Mail Format): Replace "Sender" with "Message-Id", since

the former is not always used.
(Mail Headers): Use active voice.  Add "Mail-reply-to".
Change case of "Id".  Avoid repeated "appropriate".
(Mail Aliases): Fix previous change - use an example with a ".", so it
does actually get quoted when expanded.
(Mail Sending): Mailclient is the default on some systems.
(Citing Mail): Mention mail-indentation-spaces.
(Mail Mode Misc): Add an @dfn for "mail signature".
parent 4ad1654a
2009-03-15 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* sending.texi (Mail Format): Replace "Sender" with "Message-Id", since
the former is not always used.
(Mail Headers): Use active voice. Add "Mail-reply-to".
Change case of "Id". Avoid repeated "appropriate".
(Mail Aliases): Fix previous change - use an example with a ".", so it
does actually get quoted when expanded.
(Mail Sending): Mailclient is the default on some systems.
(Citing Mail): Mention mail-indentation-spaces.
(Mail Mode Misc): Add an @dfn for "mail signature".
2009-03-15 Chong Yidong <cyd@stupidchicken.com>
* mini.texi (Completion Commands): Describe Emacs 23 completion rules.
......
......@@ -91,14 +91,14 @@ separate manual. It may be useful for looking up names and addresses.
In addition to the @dfn{text} or @dfn{body}, a message has @dfn{header
fields} which say who sent it, when, to whom, why, and so on. Some
header fields, such as @samp{Date} and @samp{Sender}, are created
header fields, such as @samp{Date} and @samp{Message-Id}, are created
automatically when you send the message. Others, such as the recipient
names, must be specified by you in order to send the message properly.
In the mail buffer, you can insert and edit header fields using
ordinary editing commands. Mail mode provides commands to help you
edit some header fields, and some are preinitialized in the buffer
automatically when appropriate.
edit some header fields, and some are automatically preinitialized in
the buffer, when appropriate.
@vindex mail-header-separator
The line in the buffer that says
......@@ -211,9 +211,14 @@ To put a fixed @samp{Reply-to} address into every outgoing message, set
the variable @code{mail-default-reply-to} to that address (as a string).
Then Emacs initializes the message with a @samp{Reply-to} field as
specified. When you first compose a mail, if
@code{mail-default-reply-to} is @code{nil}, it is initialized from the
@code{mail-default-reply-to} is @code{nil}, Emacs initializes it from the
environment variable @env{REPLYTO}.
@item Mail-reply-to
This field takes precedence over @samp{Reply-to}. It is used because
some mailing lists set the @samp{Reply-to} field for their own purposes
(a somewhat controversial practice).
@item Mail-followup-to
This field contains one or more addresses. It is typically used when
you reply to a message from a mailing list that you are subscribed to.
......@@ -237,9 +242,9 @@ when you reply to a message in Rmail, and you never need to
think about it (@pxref{Rmail}).
@item References
This field lists the message IDs of related previous messages (a message
ID is a unique identifier generated when a message is sent). Rmail sets
up this field automatically when you reply to a message.
This field lists the Message-Ids of related previous messages (a
Message-Id is a unique identifier generated when a message is sent).
Rmail sets up this field automatically when you reply to a message.
@end table
The @samp{To}, @samp{CC}, and @samp{BCC} header fields can appear
......@@ -284,8 +289,7 @@ Allow the system to insert the @samp{From} field.
outgoing message by setting the variable @code{mail-default-headers}
to a string. Then @code{C-x m} inserts this string into the message
headers. If the default header fields are not appropriate for a
particular message, edit them as appropriate before sending the
message.
particular message, edit them as necessary before sending the message.
@node Mail Aliases
@section Mail Aliases
......@@ -328,12 +332,12 @@ include double quotes around parts of the address, such as the person's
full name. Emacs puts them in if they are needed. For example,
@example
alias pres "President of the United States <president@@whitehouse.gov>"
alias jsmith "John Q. Smith <none@@example.com>"
@end example
@noindent
is correct in @samp{.mailrc}. Emacs will insert the address as
@samp{"President of the United States" <president@@whitehouse.gov>}.
@samp{"John Q. Smith" <none@@example.com>}.
Emacs also recognizes ``include'' commands in @samp{.mailrc} files.
They look like this:
......@@ -493,14 +497,16 @@ showing a list of possible coding systems.
@cindex Mailclient
@vindex send-mail-function
The variable @code{send-mail-function} controls how the default mail
user agent sends mail. It should be set to a function. The default
is @code{sendmail-send-it}, which delivers mail using the Sendmail
installation on the local host. To send mail through a SMTP server,
set it to @code{smtpmail-send-it} and set up the Emacs SMTP library
(@pxref{Top,,Emacs SMTP Library, smtpmail, Sending mail via SMTP}).
Other options are @code{feedmail-send-it} (see the commentary section of
the @file{feedmail.el} package), and @code{mailclient-send-it} (see
@file{mailclient.el}).
user agent sends mail. It should be set to a function. In most cases,
the default is @code{sendmail-send-it}, which delivers mail using the
Sendmail installation on the local host. On Mac OS X and Windows,
however, the default is normally @code{mailclient-send-it} (see
@file{mailclient.el}). To send mail through an SMTP
server, set @code{send-mail-function} to @code{smtpmail-send-it} and set
up the Emacs SMTP library (@pxref{Top,,Emacs SMTP Library, smtpmail,
Sending mail via SMTP}). Another option is @code{feedmail-send-it} (see
the commentary section of the @file{feedmail.el} package).
@c FIXME Some details of Mailclient would probably be good.
@node Header Editing
@subsection Mail Header Editing
......@@ -609,16 +615,17 @@ Fill each paragraph cited from another message
@kindex C-c C-y @r{(Mail mode)}
@findex mail-yank-original
When mail sending is invoked from the Rmail mail reader using an Rmail
command, @kbd{C-c C-y} can be used inside the mail buffer to insert
the text of the message you are replying to. Normally it indents each line
command, @kbd{C-c C-y} can be used inside the mail buffer to insert the
text of the message you are replying to. Normally it indents each line
of that message three spaces and eliminates most header fields (as
specified by the variable @code{mail-yank-ignored-headers}). A numeric
argument specifies the number of spaces to indent. An argument of just
@kbd{C-u} says not to indent at all and not to eliminate anything.
@kbd{C-c C-y} always uses the current message from the Rmail buffer,
so you can insert several old messages by selecting one in Rmail,
switching to @samp{*mail*} and yanking it, then switching back to
Rmail to select another.
argument specifies the number of spaces to indent (the variable
@code{mail-indentation-spaces} specifies the default number). An
argument of just @kbd{C-u} says not to indent at all and not to
eliminate anything. @kbd{C-c C-y} always uses the current message from
the Rmail buffer, so you can insert several old messages by selecting
one in Rmail, switching to @samp{*mail*} and yanking it, then switching
back to Rmail to select another.
@vindex mail-yank-prefix
You can specify the text for @kbd{C-c C-y} to insert at the beginning
......@@ -626,7 +633,6 @@ of each line: set @code{mail-yank-prefix} to the desired string. (A
value of @code{nil} means to use indentation; this is the default.)
However, @kbd{C-u C-c C-y} never adds anything at the beginning of the
inserted lines, regardless of the value of @code{mail-yank-prefix}.
@c Indentation controlled by mail-indentation-spaces.
@kindex C-c C-r @r{(Mail mode)}
@findex mail-yank-region
......@@ -677,14 +683,14 @@ separator line---that is, to the beginning of the message body text.
@kindex C-c C-w @r{(Mail mode)}
@findex mail-signature
@vindex mail-signature
@kbd{C-c C-w} (@code{mail-signature}) adds a standard piece of text at
the end of the message to say more about who you are. For example, it
may contain telephone numbers, or your physical location. The text
comes from the variable @code{mail-signature}. It can be a fixed
string, or a Lisp expression that returns a string. If it is @code{t}
or @code{nil}, the function inserts the contents of the file
@code{mail-signature-file}. By default, this is the file
@file{~/.signature} in your home directory.
@kbd{C-c C-w} (@code{mail-signature}) adds a standard piece of text
(your @dfn{mail signature}) at the end of the message to say more about who
you are. For example, it may contain telephone numbers, or your
physical location. The text comes from the variable
@code{mail-signature}. It can be a fixed string, or a Lisp expression
that returns a string. If it is @code{t} or @code{nil}, the function
inserts the contents of the file @code{mail-signature-file}. By
default, this is the file @file{~/.signature} in your home directory.
If the variable @code{mail-signature} has a non-@code{nil} value,
starting a mail automatically inserts your signature. Otherwise, you
......
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