Commit 262a3aac authored by Xue Fuqiao's avatar Xue Fuqiao

Add indexes for elisp manual.

* doc/lispref/display.texi (Face Functions): Add an index.

* doc/lispref/variables.texi (Variable Aliases): Add an index.

* doc/lispref/functions.texi (Defining Functions): Add an index.

* doc/lispref/nonascii.texi (Coding System Basics): Add an index.
parent 9097ad86
2013-08-02 Xue Fuqiao <xfq.free@gmail.com>
* tutorials/TUTORIAL: Remove a redundant sentence.
* tutorials/TUTORIAL.cn: Update; synchronize with TUTORIAL.
* tutorials/TUTORIAL.translators (Maintainer): Update the maintainer.
......
......@@ -372,13 +372,15 @@ the text between the two positions.
The difference between "killing" and "deleting" is that "killed" text
can be reinserted (at any position), whereas "deleted" things cannot
be reinserted in this way (you can, however, undo a deletion--see below).
Reinsertion of killed text is called "yanking". Generally, the
commands that can remove a lot of text kill the text (they are set up so
that you can yank the text), while the commands that remove just one
character, or only remove blank lines and spaces, do deletion (so you
cannot yank that text). <DEL> and C-d do deletion in the simplest
case, with no argument. When given an argument, they kill instead.
be reinserted in this way (you can, however, undo a deletion--see
below). Reinsertion of killed text is called "yanking". (Think of it
as yanking back, or pulling back, some text that was taken away.)
Generally, the commands that can remove a lot of text kill the text
(they are set up so that you can yank the text), while the commands
that remove just one character, or only remove blank lines and spaces,
do deletion (so you cannot yank that text). <DEL> and C-d do deletion
in the simplest case, with no argument. When given an argument, they
kill instead.
>> Move the cursor to the beginning of a line which is not empty.
Then type C-k to kill the text on that line.
......@@ -391,13 +393,12 @@ treats a numeric argument specially: it kills that many lines AND
their contents. This is not mere repetition. C-u 2 C-k kills two
lines and their newlines; typing C-k twice would not do that.
Reinserting killed text is called "yanking". (Think of it as yanking
back, or pulling back, some text that was taken away.) You can yank
the killed text either at the same place where it was killed, or at
some other place in the text you are editing, or even in a different
file. You can yank the same text several times; that makes multiple
copies of it. Some other editors call killing and yanking "cutting"
and "pasting" (see the Glossary in the Emacs manual).
You can yank the killed text either at the same place where it was
killed, or at some other place in the text you are editing, or even in
a different file. You can yank the same text several times; that
makes multiple copies of it. Some other editors call killing and
yanking "cutting" and "pasting" (see the Glossary in the Emacs
manual).
The command for yanking is C-y. It reinserts the last killed text,
at the current cursor position.
......
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