Commit 26f64410 authored by Eli Zaretskii's avatar Eli Zaretskii

Another set of improvements in the Emacs manual

* doc/emacs/msdos-xtra.texi (MS-DOS Keyboard):
* doc/emacs/msdos.texi (Windows Keyboard):
* doc/emacs/mark.texi (Using Region):
* doc/emacs/frames.texi (Menu Mouse Clicks):
* doc/emacs/macos.texi (Mac / GNUstep Basics): Fix spelling of
keys.  Reported by Michael Albinus <michael.albinus@gmx.de> in
emacs-manual-bugs@gnu.org.

* doc/emacs/glossary.texi (Glossary): Document that "c.f." is a
misspelling.  Reported by Robert Pluim <rpluim@gmail.com>.
Various minor wording improvements.  Suggested by Toon Claes
<toon@iotcl.com> in emacs-manual-bugs@gnu.org.
More minor changes.  Suggested by Michael Albinus
<michael.albinus@gmx.de> in emacs-manual-bugs@gnu.org.

* doc/emacs/cmdargs.texi (Title X): Improve wording.

* doc/emacs/building.texi (Grep Searching, Compilation): Avoid
passive tense.

* doc/emacs/basic.texi (Moving Point): Move the description of the
bidi-related effects of the arrow keys from here ...
* doc/emacs/mule.texi (Bidirectional Editing): ... to here.
Explain the behavior of arrow keys between paragraphs.
parent cef3b424
......@@ -184,18 +184,8 @@ Move forward one character (@code{forward-char}).
@item @key{RIGHT}
@kindex RIGHT
@findex right-char
@vindex visual-order-cursor-movement
@cindex cursor, visual-order motion
This command (@code{right-char}) behaves like @kbd{C-f}, with one
exception: when editing right-to-left scripts such as Arabic, it
instead moves @emph{backward} if the current paragraph is a
right-to-left paragraph. @xref{Bidirectional Editing}.
If @code{visual-order-cursor-movement} is non-@code{nil}, this command
moves to the character that is to the right of the current screen
position, moving to the next or previous screen line as appropriate.
Note that this might potentially move point many buffer positions
away, depending on the surrounding bidirectional context.
This command (@code{right-char}) behaves like @kbd{C-f}, except when
point is in a right-to-left paragraph (@pxref{Bidirectional Editing}).
@item C-b
@kindex C-b
......@@ -205,12 +195,8 @@ Move backward one character (@code{backward-char}).
@item @key{LEFT}
@kindex LEFT
@findex left-char
This command (@code{left-char}) behaves like @kbd{C-b}, except it
moves @emph{forward} if the current paragraph is right-to-left.
@xref{Bidirectional Editing}.
The variable @code{visual-order-cursor-movement} affects this like
@key{RIGHT}, but moving left instead of right on the screen.
This command (@code{left-char}) behaves like @kbd{C-b}, except if the
current paragraph is right-to-left (@pxref{Bidirectional Editing}).
@item C-n
@itemx @key{DOWN}
......
......@@ -90,9 +90,9 @@ inserted above point, which remains at the end. Otherwise, point
remains fixed while compilation output is added at the end of the
buffer.
While compilation proceeds, the mode line is updated to show the
number of errors, warnings, and informational messages that have been
seen so far.
While compilation proceeds, the mode line shows the number of
errors, warnings, and informational messages emitted by the compiler
so far.
@cindex compilation buffer, keeping point at end
@vindex compilation-scroll-output
......@@ -384,16 +384,16 @@ grep -nH -e foo *.el | grep bar | grep toto
can find the corresponding lines in the original files using @w{@kbd{C-x
`}}, @key{RET}, and so forth, just like compilation errors.
As with compilation commands (@pxref{Compilation}), while the grep
command runs, the mode line is updated to show the number of matches
that have been seen so far.
Some grep programs accept a @samp{--color} option to output special
markers around matches for the purpose of highlighting. You can make
use of this feature by setting @code{grep-highlight-matches} to
@code{t}. When displaying a match in the source buffer, the exact
match will be highlighted, instead of the entire source line.
As with compilation commands (@pxref{Compilation}), while the grep
command runs, the mode line shows the running number of matches found
and highlighted so far.
The @command{grep} commands will offer to save buffers before
running. This is controlled by the @code{grep-save-buffers} variable.
The possible values are either @code{nil} (don't save), @code{ask}
......
......@@ -1104,15 +1104,14 @@ border is 2.
@node Title X
@appendixsec Frame Titles
An Emacs frame may or may not have a specified title. The frame
title, if specified, appears in window decorations and icons as the
name of the frame. If an Emacs frame has no specified title, the
default title has the form @samp{@var{invocation-name}@@@var{machine}}
(if there is only one frame) or the selected window's buffer name (if
there is more than one frame).
You can specify a title for the initial Emacs frame with a command
line option:
Each Emacs frame always has a title, which appears in window
decorations and icons as the name of the frame. The default title is
of the form @samp{@var{invocation-name}@@@var{machine}} (if there is
only one frame) or shows the selected window's buffer name (if there
is more than one frame).
You can specify a non-default title for the initial Emacs frame with
a command line option:
@table @samp
@item -T @var{title}
......
......@@ -312,7 +312,7 @@ button.
@node Menu Mouse Clicks
@section Mouse Clicks for Menus
Several mouse clicks with the @key{CTRL} and @key{SHIFT} modifiers
Several mouse clicks with the @key{Ctrl} and @key{SHIFT} modifiers
bring up menus.
@table @kbd
......
......@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ Setting the mark (q.v.@:) at a position in the text also activates it.
When the mark is active, we call the region an active region.
@xref{Mark}.
@item Alt
@item @key{Alt}
Alt is the name of a modifier bit that a keyboard input character may
have. To make a character Alt, type it while holding down the @key{Alt}
key. Such characters are given names that start with @kbd{@key{Alt}-}
......@@ -160,10 +160,11 @@ right away when you press down on a mouse button. @xref{Mouse Buttons}.
@item Byte Compilation
@xref{Glossary---Compilation}.
@item c.f.
@itemx cf.
@item cf.
@itemx c.f.
Short for ``confer'' in Latin, which means ``compare with'' or
``compare to''.
``compare to''. The second variant, ``c.f.'', is a widespread
misspelling.
@anchor{Glossary---C-}
@item @kbd{C-}
......@@ -192,7 +193,7 @@ other input events as well). @xref{User Input}.
@item Character Folding
Character folding means ignoring differences between similarly looking
characters, such as between @code{a}, and @code{@:a} and @code{@'a}.
characters, such as between @code{a}, and @code{@"a} and @code{@'a}.
Emacs performs character folding by default in text search. @xref{Lax
Search}.
......@@ -225,14 +226,16 @@ text to or from a variety of coding systems when reading or writing it.
@xref{Coding Systems}.
@item Command
A command is a Lisp function specially defined to be able to serve as a
key binding in Emacs. When you type a key sequence (q.v.), its
binding (q.v.@:) is looked up in the relevant keymaps (q.v.@:) to find
the command to run. @xref{Commands}.
A command is a Lisp function specially defined to be able to serve as
a key binding in Emacs or to be invoked by its name
(@pxref{Glossary---Command Name}). When you type a key sequence
(q.v.), its binding (q.v.@:) is looked up in the relevant keymaps
(q.v.@:) to find the command to run. @xref{Commands}.
@item Command History
@xref{Glossary---Minibuffer History}.
@anchor{Glossary---Command Name}
@item Command Name
A command name is the name of a Lisp symbol that is a command
(@pxref{Commands}). You can invoke any command by its name using
......@@ -255,7 +258,8 @@ Compilation is the process of creating an executable program from source
code. Emacs has commands for compiling files of Emacs Lisp code
(@pxref{Byte Compilation,,, elisp, the Emacs Lisp
Reference Manual}) and programs in C and other languages
(@pxref{Compilation}).
(@pxref{Compilation}). Byte-compiled Emacs Lisp code loads and
executes faster.
@item Complete Key
A complete key is a key sequence that fully specifies one action to be
......@@ -875,7 +879,7 @@ A local value of a variable (q.v.@:) applies to only one buffer.
@xref{Locals}.
@item @kbd{M-}
@kbd{M-} in the name of a character is an abbreviation for @key{Meta},
@kbd{M-} in the name of a character is an abbreviation for @key{META},
one of the modifier keys that can accompany any character.
@xref{User Input,M-}.
......@@ -933,15 +937,15 @@ a keyboard interface to navigate it. @xref{Menu Bars}.
@item Meta
Meta is the name of a modifier bit which you can use in a command
character. To enter a meta character, you hold down the @key{Meta}
character. To enter a meta character, you hold down the @key{META}
key while typing the character. We refer to such characters with
names that start with @kbd{Meta-} (usually written @kbd{M-} for
short). For example, @kbd{M-<} is typed by holding down @key{Meta}
short). For example, @kbd{M-<} is typed by holding down @key{META}
and at the same time typing @kbd{<} (which itself is done, on most
terminals, by holding down @key{SHIFT} and typing @kbd{,}).
@xref{User Input,Meta}.
On some terminals, the @key{Meta} key is actually labeled @key{Alt}
On some terminals, the @key{META} key is actually labeled @key{Alt}
or @key{Edit}.
@item Meta Character
......@@ -1139,8 +1143,8 @@ one corner and putting the mark at the diagonally opposite corner.
A recursive editing level is a state in which part of the execution of
a command involves asking you to edit some text. This text may
or may not be the same as the text to which the command was applied.
The mode line indicates recursive editing levels with square brackets
(@samp{[} and @samp{]}). @xref{Recursive Edit}.
The mode line (q.v.@:) indicates recursive editing levels with square
brackets (@samp{[} and @samp{]}). @xref{Recursive Edit}.
@item Redisplay
Redisplay is the process of correcting the image on the screen to
......@@ -1168,7 +1172,7 @@ digits. @xref{Regexps}.
@item Remote File
A remote file is a file that is stored on a system other than your own.
Emacs can access files on other computers provided that they are
connected to the same network as your machine, and (obviously) that
reachable from your machine over the network, and (obviously) that
you have a supported method to gain access to those files.
@xref{Remote Files}.
......@@ -1190,8 +1194,9 @@ newline into the text. It is also used to terminate most arguments
read in the minibuffer (q.v.). @xref{User Input,Return}.
@item Reverting
Reverting means returning to the original state. Emacs lets you
revert a buffer by re-reading its file from disk. @xref{Reverting}.
Reverting means returning to the original state. For example, Emacs
lets you revert a buffer by re-reading its file from disk.
@xref{Reverting}.
@c Seems too obvious, also there is nothing special about the format
@c these days.
......@@ -1363,6 +1368,7 @@ Emacs does not make a termscript file unless you tell it to.
@xref{Bugs}.
@item Text
``Text'' has two meanings (@pxref{Text}):
@itemize @bullet
......@@ -1371,6 +1377,7 @@ Data consisting of a sequence of characters, as opposed to binary
numbers, executable programs, and the like. The basic contents of an
Emacs buffer (aside from the text properties, q.v.@:) are always text
in this sense.
@item
Data consisting of written human language (as opposed to programs),
or following the stylistic conventions of human language.
......@@ -1473,7 +1480,7 @@ where they can be edited. @xref{Visiting}.
@item Whitespace
Whitespace is any run of consecutive formatting characters (space,
tab, newline, and backspace).
tab, newline, backspace, etc.).
@item Widening
Widening is removing any restriction (q.v.@:) on the current buffer;
......
......@@ -34,8 +34,8 @@ Support}), but we hope to improve it in the future.
@node Mac / GNUstep Basics
@section Basic Emacs usage under macOS and GNUstep
By default, the @key{alt} and @key{option} keys are the same as
@key{Meta}. The Mac @key{Cmd} key is the same as @key{Super}, and
By default, the @key{Alt} and @key{Option} keys are the same as
@key{META}. The Mac @key{Cmd} key is the same as @key{Super}, and
Emacs provides a set of key bindings using this modifier key that mimic
other Mac / GNUstep applications (@pxref{Mac / GNUstep Events}). You
can change these bindings in the usual way (@pxref{Key Bindings}).
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ can change these bindings in the usual way (@pxref{Key Bindings}).
@vindex ns-alternate-modifier
@vindex ns-right-alternate-modifier
The variable @code{ns-right-alternate-modifier} controls the
behavior of the right @key{alt} and @key{option} keys. These keys
behavior of the right @key{Alt} and @key{Option} keys. These keys
behave like the left-hand keys if the value is @code{left} (the
default). A value of @code{control}, @code{meta}, @code{alt},
@code{super}, or @code{hyper} makes them behave like the corresponding
......
......@@ -260,7 +260,7 @@ change the variable @code{use-empty-active-region} to @code{t}.
@vindex delete-active-region
As described in @ref{Erasing}, the @key{DEL}
(@code{backward-delete-char}) and @key{delete}
(@code{backward-delete-char}) and @key{Delete}
(@code{delete-forward-char}) commands also act this way. If the mark
is active, they delete the text in the region. (As an exception, if
you supply a numeric argument @var{n}, where @var{n} is not one, these
......
......@@ -84,7 +84,7 @@ a running command and for emergency escape
@vindex dos-super-key
@vindex dos-hyper-key
The PC keyboard maps use the left @key{Alt} key as the @key{META} key.
You have two choices for emulating the @key{SUPER} and @key{HYPER} keys:
You have two choices for emulating the @key{SUPER} and @key{Hyper} keys:
choose either the right @key{Ctrl} key or the right @key{Alt} key by
setting the variables @code{dos-hyper-key} and @code{dos-super-key} to 1
or 2 respectively. If neither @code{dos-super-key} nor
......
......@@ -575,7 +575,7 @@ keys (it converts lower-case characters to their upper-case
variants). However, if you set the variable
@code{w32-capslock-is-shiftlock} to a non-@code{nil} value, the
@key{CapsLock} key will affect non-character keys as well, as if you
pressed the @key{Shift} key while typing the non-character key.
pressed the @key{SHIFT} key while typing the non-character key.
@vindex w32-enable-caps-lock
If the variable @code{w32-enable-caps-lock} is set to a @code{nil}
......
......@@ -1841,7 +1841,33 @@ sometimes jump when point traverses reordered bidirectional text.
Similarly, a highlighted region covering a contiguous range of
character positions may look discontinuous if the region spans
reordered text. This is normal and similar to the behavior of other
programs that support bidirectional text. If you set
@code{visual-order-cursor-movement} to a non-@code{nil} value, cursor
motion by the arrow keys follows the visual order on screen
(@pxref{Moving Point, visual-order movement}).
programs that support bidirectional text.
@kindex RIGHT@r{, and bidirectional text}
@kindex LEFT@r{, and bidirectional text}
@findex right-char@r{, and bidirectional text}
@findex left-char@r{, and bidirectional text}
Cursor motion commands bound to arrow keys, such as @key{LEFT} and
@kbd{C-@key{RIGHT}}, are sensitive to the base direction of the
current paragraph. In a left-to-right paragraph, commands bound to
@key{RIGHT} with or without modifiers move @emph{forward} through
buffer text, but in a right-to-left paragraph they move
@emph{backward} instead. This reflects the fact that in a
right-to-left paragraph buffer positions predominantly increase when
moving to the left on display.
When you move out of a paragraph, the meaning of the arrow keys
might change if the base direction of the preceding or the following
paragraph is different from the paragraph out of which you moved.
When that happens, you need to adjust the arrow key you press to the
new base direction.
@vindex visual-order-cursor-movement
@cindex cursor, visual-order motion
By default, @key{LEFT} and @key{RIGHT} move in the logical order,
but if @code{visual-order-cursor-movement} is non-@code{nil}, these
commands move to the character that is, correspondingly, to the left
or right of the current screen position, moving to the next or
previous screen line as appropriate. Note that this might potentially
move point many buffer positions away, depending on the surrounding
bidirectional context.
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