Commit 279558f4 authored by Paul Eggert's avatar Paul Eggert

Minor quoting etc. fixes to misc manuals

Fix some minor quoting and spacing issues.  Distinguish more
clearly among grave accent and apostrophe (which are ASCII) and
single quote (which is not).  Prefer the standard terms
"apostrophe" and "grave accent" to alternative names that can be
confusing.  Use apostrophes to single-quote ASCII text.
* doc/misc/remember.texi: Spell the mystic's pseudonym in UTF-8
rather than approximating it in ASCII with grave accent.
parent 7c7b96eb
......@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@
SHELL = @SHELL@
# Where to find the source code. $(srcdir) will be the doc/misc subdirectory
# of the source tree. This is set by configure's `--srcdir' option.
# of the source tree. This is set by configure's '--srcdir' option.
srcdir=@srcdir@
## Where the output files go.
......
......@@ -110,11 +110,11 @@ The @code{user} is the user name. It's known as @var{:user} in
You can use spaces inside a password or other token by surrounding the
token with either single or double quotes.
You can use single quotes inside a password or other token by
You can use apostrophes inside a password or other token by
surrounding it with double quotes, e.g., @code{"he'llo"}. Similarly you
can use double quotes inside a password or other token by surrounding
it with single quotes, e.g., @code{'he"llo'}. You can't mix both (so a
password or other token can't have both single and double quotes).
it with apostrophes, e.g., @code{'he"llo'}. You can't mix both (so a
password or other token can't have both apostrophes and double quotes).
All this is optional. You could just say (but we don't recommend it,
we're just showing that it's possible)
......
......@@ -331,8 +331,9 @@ character is part of a word. If you want pairing to occur even then, set
@vindex skeleton-pair-alist
Pairing is possible for all visible characters. By default the
parenthesis @samp{(}, the square bracket @samp{[}, the brace
@samp{@{}, the pointed bracket @samp{<} and the backquote @samp{`} all
pair with the symmetrical character. All other characters pair
@samp{@{} and the pointed bracket @samp{<} all
pair with the symmetrical character, and the grave accent @samp{`}
pairs with the apostrophe @samp{'}. All other characters pair
themselves. This behavior can be modified by the variable
@code{skeleton-pair-alist}. This is in fact an alist of skeletons
(@pxref{Skeleton Language}), with the first part of each sublist
......@@ -341,8 +342,8 @@ but since pairs don't need the @code{str} element, this is ignored.
Some modes have bound the command @code{skeleton-pair-insert-maybe}
to relevant keys. These modes also configure the pairs as
appropriate. For example, when typing english prose, you'd expect the
backquote (@samp{`}) to pair with the quote (@samp{'}), while in Shell
appropriate. For example, when typing @TeX{} input, you'd expect the
grave accent (@samp{`}) to pair with the apostrophe (@samp{'}), while in Shell
script mode it must pair to itself. They can also inhibit pairing in
certain contexts. For example an escaped character stands for itself.
......@@ -626,7 +627,7 @@ See the commentary in @file{tempo.el} for more information on using the
Tempo package.
@node Hippie Expand
@chapter `Hippie' Expansion
@chapter ``Hippie'' Expansion
@findex hippie-expand
@kindex M-/
......
......@@ -12,9 +12,9 @@
@c The following macros are used for conditional output for single lines.
@c @texline foo
@c `foo' will appear only in TeX output
@c 'foo' will appear only in TeX output
@c @infoline foo
@c `foo' will appear only in non-TeX output
@c 'foo' will appear only in non-TeX output
@c @expr{expr} will typeset an expression;
@c $x$ in TeX, @samp{x} otherwise.
......@@ -431,7 +431,7 @@ Type @kbd{2 @key{RET} 3 + Q} to compute
@noindent
Type @kbd{P 2 ^} to compute
@texline @math{\pi^2 = 9.86960440109}.
@infoline the value of `pi' squared, 9.86960440109.
@infoline the value of @cpi{} squared, 9.86960440109.
@noindent
Type @key{TAB} to exchange the order of these two results.
......@@ -455,7 +455,7 @@ Type @kbd{' sqrt(2+3) @key{RET}} to compute
@noindent
Type @kbd{' pi^2 @key{RET}} to enter
@texline @math{\pi^2}.
@infoline `pi' squared.
@infoline @cpi{} squared.
To evaluate this symbolic formula as a number, type @kbd{=}.
@noindent
......@@ -1241,7 +1241,7 @@ finished in two weeks.
@c [tutorial]
@ifinfo
@c This node is accessed by the `C-x * t' command.
@c This node is accessed by the 'C-x * t' command.
@node Interactive Tutorial, Tutorial, Getting Started, Top
@chapter Tutorial
......@@ -2164,7 +2164,7 @@ the prefix.
One more way to correct an error is by editing the stack entries.
The actual Stack buffer is marked read-only and must not be edited
directly, but you can press @kbd{`} (the backquote or accent grave)
directly, but you can press @kbd{`} (grave accent)
to edit a stack entry.
Try entering @samp{3.141439} now. If this is supposed to represent
......@@ -2471,7 +2471,7 @@ We don't have enough space here to show all the zeros! They won't
fit on a typical screen, either, so you will have to use horizontal
scrolling to see them all. Press @kbd{<} and @kbd{>} to scroll the
stack window left and right by half its width. Another way to view
something large is to press @kbd{`} (back-quote) to edit the top of
something large is to press @kbd{`} (grave accent) to edit the top of
stack in a separate window. (Press @kbd{C-c C-c} when you are done.)
You can enter non-decimal numbers using the @kbd{#} symbol, too.
......@@ -3658,7 +3658,7 @@ fast! (But of course if you use @kbd{t .} you will lose the ability
to get old vectors back using the @kbd{t y} command.)
An easy way to view a full vector when @kbd{v .} mode is active is
to press @kbd{`} (back-quote) to edit the vector; editing always works
to press @kbd{`} (grave accent) to edit the vector; editing always works
with the full, unabbreviated value.
@cindex Least-squares for fitting a straight line
......@@ -6012,7 +6012,7 @@ fix, though:
@end smallexample
@noindent
When we type @kbd{Z `} (that's a back-quote character), Calc saves
When we type @kbd{Z `} (that's a grave accent), Calc saves
its mode settings and the contents of the ten ``quick variables''
for later reference. When we type @kbd{Z '} (that's an apostrophe
now), Calc restores those saved values. Thus the @kbd{p 4} and
......@@ -9042,7 +9042,7 @@ matrix (or other value) to the power @expr{n} in only
@texline @math{\log_2 n}
@infoline @expr{log(n,2)}
steps. For example, this program can compute the 1000th Fibonacci
number (a 209-digit integer!) in about 10 steps; even though the
number (a 209-digit integer!)@: in about 10 steps; even though the
@kbd{Z < ... Z >} solution had much simpler steps, it would have
required so many steps that it would not have been practical.
......@@ -10029,7 +10029,7 @@ this would be to fix a typo, as the full Emacs cursor motion and editing
keys are available during algebraic entry but not during numeric entry.
In the same vein, during either numeric or algebraic entry you can
press @kbd{`} (backquote) to switch to @code{calc-edit} mode, where
press @kbd{`} (grave accent) to switch to @code{calc-edit} mode, where
you complete your half-finished entry in a separate buffer.
@xref{Editing Stack Entries}.
......@@ -10174,7 +10174,7 @@ an ASCII character.
For example, the quoted character @samp{"x"} produces the vector
result @samp{[120]} (because 120 is the ASCII code of the lower-case
`x'; @pxref{Strings}). Since this is a vector, not an integer, it
``x''; @pxref{Strings}). Since this is a vector, not an integer, it
is displayed only according to the current mode settings. But
running Quick Calc again and entering @samp{120} will produce the
result @samp{120 (16#78, 8#170, x)} which shows the number in its
......@@ -11871,10 +11871,10 @@ the stack objects at the levels determined by the point and the mark.
@cindex Editing the stack with Emacs
The @kbd{`} (@code{calc-edit}) command creates a temporary buffer
(@file{*Calc Edit*}) for editing the top-of-stack value using regular
Emacs commands. Note that @kbd{`} is a backquote, not a quote. With a
numeric prefix argument, it edits the specified number of stack entries
at once. (An argument of zero edits the entire stack; a negative
argument edits one specific stack entry.)
Emacs commands. Note that @kbd{`} is a grave accent, not an apostrophe.
With a numeric prefix argument, it edits the specified number of stack
entries at once. (An argument of zero edits the entire stack; a
negative argument edits one specific stack entry.)
When you are done editing, press @kbd{C-c C-c} to finish and return
to Calc. The @key{RET} and @key{LFD} keys also work to finish most
......@@ -13609,11 +13609,11 @@ Weekday: ``Sunday'' for Sunday.
@item Iww
Week number: ISO 8601 week number, ``W01'' for week 1.
@item d
Day of year: ``34'' for Feb. 3.
Day of year: ``34'' for Feb.@: 3.
@item ddd
Day of year: ``034'' for Feb. 3.
Day of year: ``034'' for Feb.@: 3.
@item bdd
Day of year: `` 34'' for Feb. 3.
Day of year: `` 34'' for Feb.@: 3.
@item T
Letter: Literal ``T''.
@item h
......@@ -19228,7 +19228,7 @@ non-empty sets, respectively.
The @kbd{k p} (@code{calc-prime-test}) command checks if the integer on
the top of the stack is prime. For integers less than eight million, the
answer is always exact and reasonably fast. For larger integers, a
probabilistic method is used (see Knuth vol. II, section 4.5.4, algorithm P).
probabilistic method is used (see Knuth vol.@: II, section 4.5.4, algorithm P).
The number is first checked against small prime factors (up to 13). Then,
any number of iterations of the algorithm are performed. Each step either
discovers that the number is non-prime, or substantially increases the
......@@ -31848,7 +31848,7 @@ local variables inside the macro should not affect any variables
outside the macro. The @kbd{Z `} (@code{calc-kbd-push}) and @kbd{Z '}
(@code{calc-kbd-pop}) commands give you both of these capabilities.
When you type @kbd{Z `} (with a backquote or accent grave character),
When you type @kbd{Z `} (with a grave accent),
the values of various mode settings are saved away. The ten ``quick''
variables @code{q0} through @code{q9} are also saved. When
you type @w{@kbd{Z '}} (with an apostrophe), these values are restored.
......@@ -34284,7 +34284,7 @@ you can call it again with the same @var{n} to get a greater certainty;
@defun to-simple-fraction f
If @var{f} is a floating-point number which can be represented exactly
as a small rational number. return that number, else return @var{f}.
as a small rational number, return that number, else return @var{f}.
For example, 0.75 would be converted to 3:4. This function is very
fast.
@end defun
......@@ -88,7 +88,7 @@ the second with them pointing to the XEmacs manuals.
@c The following four macros generate the filenames and titles of the
@c main (X)Emacs manual and the Elisp/Lispref manual. Leave the
@c Texinfo variable `XEMACS' unset to generate a GNU Emacs version, set it
@c Texinfo variable 'XEMACS' unset to generate a GNU Emacs version, set it
@c to generate an XEmacs version, e.g., with
@c "makeinfo -DXEMACS cc-mode.texi".
@ifset XEMACS
......@@ -1156,7 +1156,7 @@ When this is enabled (which it normally is), indentation commands such
as @kbd{C-j} indent lines of code according to their syntactic
structure. Otherwise, a line is simply indented to the same level as
the previous one and @kbd{@key{TAB}} adjusts the indentation in steps
of `c-basic-offset'.
of @code{c-basic-offset}.
@end table
Full details on how these minor modes work are at @ref{Electric Keys},
......@@ -2045,7 +2045,7 @@ conflict).
The value may also be an association list to specify different comment
styles for different languages. The symbol for the major mode is then
looked up in the alist, and the value of that element is interpreted as
above if found. If it isn't found then the symbol `other' is looked up
above if found. If it isn't found then the symbol @code{other} is looked up
and its value is used instead.
The default value for @code{c-doc-comment-style} is
......@@ -3299,7 +3299,7 @@ only the symbol @code{after}, then the brace hangs on the right side
of the line, as in:
@example
// here, open braces always `hang'
// here, open braces always 'hang'
void spam( int i ) @{
if( i == 7 ) @{
dosomething(i);
......@@ -3992,7 +3992,7 @@ Hitting @kbd{C-c C-s} on line 4 gives us:
@cindex substatement block
@noindent
which tells us that this is a brace that @emph{opens} a substatement
block. @footnote{A @dfn{substatement} is the line after a
block.@footnote{A @dfn{substatement} is the line after a
conditional statement, such as @code{if}, @code{else}, @code{while},
@code{do}, @code{switch}, etc. A @dfn{substatement
block} is a brace block following one of these conditional statements.}
......@@ -4765,10 +4765,10 @@ covered are illustrated by this C++ example:
2: const
3: @{
4: /* this line starts a multiline
5: * comment. This line should get `c' syntax */
5: * comment. This line should get 'c' syntax */
6:
7: char* a_multiline_string = "This line starts a multiline \
8: string. This line should get `string' syntax.";
8: string. This line should get 'string' syntax.";
9:
10: note:
11: @{
......@@ -7174,7 +7174,7 @@ Emacs Lisp code that triggers the bug and include it in your report.
@cindex bug report mailing list
Bug reports should be sent to @email{bug-cc-mode@@gnu.org}. You can
also send other questions and suggestions (kudos? @t{;-)} to that
also send other questions and suggestions (kudos?@: @t{;-)} to that
address. It's a mailing list which you can join or browse an archive
of; see the web site at @uref{http://cc-mode.sourceforge.net/} for
further details.
......
......@@ -570,20 +570,20 @@ When @file{foo.el} is compiled, these variables will be set during
the compilation itself:
@example
foo1 foo3 foo5 foo7 ; `compile'
foo1 foo3 foo5 foo7 ; 'compile'
@end example
When @file{foo.elc} is loaded, these variables will be set:
@example
foo2 foo3 foo6 foo7 ; `load'
foo2 foo3 foo6 foo7 ; 'load'
@end example
And if @file{foo.el} is loaded uncompiled, these variables will
be set:
@example
foo4 foo5 foo6 foo7 ; `eval'
foo4 foo5 foo6 foo7 ; 'eval'
@end example
If these seven @code{cl-eval-when}s had been, say, inside a @code{defun},
......@@ -978,7 +978,7 @@ a
The generalized variable @code{buffer-substring}, listed above,
also works in this way by replacing a portion of the current buffer.
@c FIXME? Also `eq'? (see cl-lib.el)
@c FIXME? Also 'eq'? (see cl-lib.el)
@c Currently commented out in cl.el.
@ignore
......
......@@ -973,7 +973,7 @@ displayed in the member buffer.
@cindex @code{public} members
@item F a u
This command toggles the display of @code{public} members. The
@samp{a} stands for `access'.
@samp{a} stands for ``access''.
@cindex @code{protected} members
@item F a o
......
......@@ -868,7 +868,7 @@ It would look like this:
(defun MY-ROOT-FCN ()
"Return the root fcn for `default-directory'"
;; You might be able to use `ede-cpp-root-project-root'
;; You might be able to use 'ede-cpp-root-project-root'
;; and not write this at all.
)
......@@ -1856,7 +1856,7 @@ Preprocessor symbols will be used while parsing your files.
These macros might be passed in through the command line compiler, or
are critical symbols derived from header files. Providing header files
macro values through this slot improves accuracy and performance.
Use `:spp-files' to use these files directly.
Use @code{:spp-files} to use these files directly.
@item :spp-files
Type: @code{list} @*
......@@ -2799,7 +2799,7 @@ Default Value: @code{t}
Non @code{nil} means the rule created is part of the all target.
Setting this to @code{nil} creates the rule to build this item, but does not
include it in the ALL`all:' rule.
include it in the @code{all:} rule.
@item :configuration-variables
Type: @code{list} @*
......@@ -3457,7 +3457,7 @@ Return the variable name for @var{THIS}'s sources.
@deffn Method ede-proj-makefile-insert-dist-dependencies :AFTER this
Insert any symbols that the DIST rule should depend on.
Texinfo files want to insert generated `.info' files.
Texinfo files want to insert generated @file{.info} files.
Argument @var{THIS} is the target which needs to insert an info file.
@end deffn
......@@ -3473,7 +3473,7 @@ files in the project.
@deffn Method ede-proj-makefile-insert-dist-filepatterns :AFTER this
Insert any symbols that the DIST rule should depend on.
Texinfo files want to insert generated `.info' files.
Texinfo files want to insert generated @file{.info} files.
Argument @var{THIS} is the target which needs to insert an info file.
@end deffn
......
......@@ -556,9 +556,9 @@ Makes the next difference region current.
@kindex j
Makes the very first difference region current.
@kbd{-j} makes the last region current. Typing a number, N, and then `j'
@kbd{-j} makes the last region current. Typing a number, N, and then @kbd{j}
makes the difference region N current. Typing @minus{}N (a negative number) then
`j' makes current the region Last @minus{} N.
@kbd{j} makes current the region Last @minus{} N.
@item ga
@kindex ga
......@@ -615,8 +615,8 @@ no longer current, due to user editing.
@item m
@kindex m
Displays the current Ediff session in a frame as wide as the physical
display. This is useful when comparing files side-by-side. Typing `m' again
restores the original size of the frame.
display. This is useful when comparing files side-by-side.
Typing @kbd{m} again restores the original size of the frame.
@item |
@kindex |
......@@ -675,7 +675,7 @@ Tell Ediff to skip over regions that disagree among themselves only in the
amount of white space and line breaks.
Even though such regions will be skipped over, you can still jump to any
one of them by typing the region number and then `j'. Typing @kbd{##}
one of them by typing the region number and then @kbd{j}. Typing @kbd{##}
again puts Ediff back in the original state.
@item #c
......@@ -695,7 +695,8 @@ and @code{ediff-ignore-case}, which are explained elsewhere.
Ediff works hard to ameliorate the effects of boredom in the workplace...
Quite often differences are due to identical replacements (e.g., the word
`foo' is replaced with the word `bar' everywhere). If the number of regions
``foo'' is replaced with the word ``bar'' everywhere). If the number
of regions
with such boring differences exceeds your tolerance threshold, you may be
tempted to tell Ediff to skip these regions altogether (you will still be able
to jump to them via the command @kbd{j}). The above commands, @kbd{#h}
......@@ -750,7 +751,7 @@ You can then restart any of these sessions by either clicking on a session
record or by putting the cursor over it and then typing the return key.
(Some poor souls leave so many active Ediff sessions around that they lose
track of them completely... The `R' command is designed to save these
track of them completely... The @kbd{R} command is designed to save these
people from the recently discovered Ediff Proficiency Syndrome.)
Typing @kbd{R} brings up Ediff Registry only if it is typed into an Ediff
......@@ -800,8 +801,8 @@ is that this difference region in buffer A is as old as that in the
ancestor buffer, so the contents of that region in buffer B represents real
change.
You may want to ignore such `obvious' merges and concentrate on difference
regions where both files `clash' with the ancestor, since this means that
You may want to ignore such ``obvious'' merges and concentrate on difference
regions where both files ``clash'' with the ancestor, since this means that
two different people have been changing this region independently and they
had different ideas on how to do this.
......@@ -818,10 +819,10 @@ precisely this.
To be more precise, this toggles the check for whether the current merge is
identical to its default setting, as originally decided by Ediff. For
instance, if Ediff is merging according to the `combined' policy, then the
instance, if Ediff is merging according to the ``combined'' policy, then the
merge region is skipped over if it is different from the combination of the
regions in buffers A and B@. (Warning: swapping buffers A and B will confuse
things in this respect.) If the merge region is marked as `prefer-A' then
things in this respect.) If the merge region is marked as ``prefer-A'' then
this region will be skipped if it differs from the current difference
region in buffer A, etc.
......@@ -851,7 +852,7 @@ corresponding region from buffer B.
@item s
@kindex s
Causes the merge window shrink to its minimum size, thereby exposing as much
of the variant buffers as possible. Typing `s' again restores
of the variant buffers as possible. Typing @kbd{s} again restores
the original size of that window.
With a positive prefix argument, this command enlarges the merge window.
......@@ -1164,7 +1165,7 @@ customization and faces) can be done by putting appropriate lines in
@file{.Xdefaults}, @file{.xrdb}, or whatever X resource file is in use.
With respect to the latter, please note that the X resource
for Ediff customization is `Ediff', @emph{not} `emacs'.
for Ediff customization is ``Ediff'', @emph{not} ``emacs''.
@xref{Window and Frame Configuration},
@xref{Highlighting Difference Regions}, for further details. Please also
refer to Emacs manual for the information on how to set Emacs X resources.
......@@ -1510,7 +1511,7 @@ We shall call these regular expressions @var{regexp-A}, @var{regexp-B} and
@var{regexp-C}.
Ediff will then start stepping through only those difference regions
where the region in buffer A matches @var{regexp-A} and/or the region in
buffer B matches @var{regexp-B}, etc. Whether `and' or `or' will be used
buffer B matches @var{regexp-B}, etc. Whether ``and'' or ``or'' will be used
depends on how you respond to a question.
When scanning difference regions for the aforesaid regular expressions,
......@@ -1888,10 +1889,11 @@ Otherwise, you may have to tune the values of the variables
@item ediff-patch-options
Options to pass to @code{ediff-patch-program}.
Note: the `-b' and `-z' options should be specified in
`ediff-backup-specs', not in @code{ediff-patch-options}.
Note: the @option{-b} and @option{-z} options should be specified in
@code{ediff-backup-specs}, not in @code{ediff-patch-options}.
It is recommended to pass the `-f' option to the patch program, so it won't
It is recommended to pass the @option{-f} option to the patch program,
so it won't
ask questions. However, some implementations don't accept this option, in
which case the default value of this variable should be changed.
......@@ -1901,19 +1903,23 @@ Backup extension used by the patch program. Must be specified, even if
@item ediff-backup-specs
Backup directives to pass to the patch program.
Ediff requires that the old version of the file (before applying the patch)
is saved in a file named @file{the-patch-file.extension}. Usually
`extension' is `.orig', but this can be changed by the user, and may also be
is saved in a file named @file{the-patch-file.@var{extension}}.
Usually @var{extension} is @file{.orig}, but this can be changed by
the user, and may also be
system-dependent. Therefore, Ediff needs to know the backup extension used
by the patch program.
Some versions of the patch program let the user specify `-b backup-extension'.
Other versions only permit `-b', which (usually) assumes the extension `.orig'.
Yet others force you to use `-z<backup-extension>'.
Some versions of the patch program let the user specify @option{-b
@var{extension}} to specify a backup file name extension. Other
versions only permit @option{-b}, which (usually) assumes the
extension @file{.orig}. Yet others force you to use
@option{-z@var{extension}}.
Note that both `ediff-backup-extension' and `ediff-backup-specs' must be
properly set. If your patch program takes the option `-b', but not
`-b extension', the variable `ediff-backup-extension' must still
be set so Ediff will know which extension to use.
Both @code{ediff-backup-extension} and @var{ediff-backup-specs} must
be properly set. If your patch program takes the option @option{-b},
but not @option{-b @var{extension}}, the variable
@code{ediff-backup-extension} must still be set so Ediff will know
which extension to use.
@item ediff-custom-diff-program
@itemx ediff-custom-diff-options
......@@ -2105,7 +2111,7 @@ typing @kbd{s}. This change is temporary, until Ediff finds a reason to
redraw the screen. Typing @kbd{s} again restores the original window size.
With a positive prefix argument, the @kbd{s} command will make the merge
window slightly taller. This change is persistent. With `@kbd{-}' or
window slightly taller. This change is persistent. With ``@kbd{-}'' or
with a negative prefix argument, the command @kbd{s} makes the merge
window slightly shorter. This change also persistent.
......
......@@ -710,7 +710,7 @@ functions are bound to @key{F7}, @key{F8}, @kbd{GOLD-F8}, @key{F9},
@item
The original EDT emulation package set up many default regular and GOLD
bindings. We tried to preserve most (but not all!) of these, so users
bindings. We tried to preserve most (but not all!)@: of these, so users
of the original emulation package will feel more at home.
Nevertheless, there are still many GOLD key sequences which are not
......
......@@ -22,7 +22,7 @@ Copyright @copyright{} 2008, 2010-2015 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@quotation
This list of frequently asked questions about GNU Emacs on MS Windows
with answers (``FAQ'') may be translated into other languages,
transformed into other formats (e.g. Texinfo, Info, WWW), and updated
transformed into other formats (e.g., Texinfo, Info, WWW), and updated
with new information.
The same conditions apply to any derivative of the FAQ as apply to the FAQ
......@@ -594,7 +594,7 @@ Subject: Re: Re[2]: problem with caps/ctrl swap on NT 4.0
@smallexample
It's a binary value that lets you map keystrokes in the low-level keyboard
drivers in NT. As a result you don't have to worry about applications
bypassing mappings that you've done at a higher level (i.e. it just works).
bypassing mappings that you've done at a higher level (i.e., it just works).
Here's the format of the value:
......@@ -674,7 +674,7 @@ The minor mode @code{transient-mark-mode} changes the behavior of
the mark in two ways. First, it distinguishes between an active mark
that has just been defined or reactivated, and an inactive mark. When
the mark is active, some commands that normally act on lines, words,
buffers etc. will instead act on the region. An inactive mark needs
buffers, etc., will instead act on the region. An inactive mark needs
to be reactivated to operate on it, unless @code{mark-even-if-inactive}
is set. Secondly, @code{transient-mark-mode} also highlights the
region when it is active, providing the same visual clue that you get
......@@ -2029,8 +2029,8 @@ select it. For arguments, use @option{+$(CurLine)}
(the quotes around FilePath handle paths with spaces in them). Set the
Menu Text to say "Em&acs". The @option{+$(CurLine)} will set point in
Emacs to the same line as the cursor position in VC++. The ampersand
in the word @code{Em&acs} allows you to select emacs from the keyboard. (E
is already used for the OLE control test container.)
in the word @code{Em&acs} allows you to select emacs from the keyboard.
(E is already used for the OLE control test container.)
You should now be able to go to any source file in your project. Then,
use the pull-down menu @code{Tools->Emacs}. The active file in your
......
......@@ -3670,7 +3670,7 @@ for deleting the previous character outside of Emacs. On many Unix
systems, this command will remap @key{DEL}:
@example
stty erase `^?'
stty erase '^?'
@end example
@item
......@@ -3766,8 +3766,8 @@ You can swap two keys (or key sequences) by using the
into @key{DEL} and @key{DEL} to @kbd{C-h}, use
@lisp
(keyboard-translate ?\C-h ?\C-?) ; translate `C-h' to DEL
(keyboard-translate ?\C-? ?\C-h) ; translate DEL to `C-h'.
(keyboard-translate ?\C-h ?\C-?) ; translate 'C-h' to DEL
(keyboard-translate ?\C-? ?\C-h) ; translate DEL to 'C-h'.
@end lisp
@noindent
......
......@@ -233,7 +233,7 @@ first argument, and this one must be an @eieio{} type.
@item Support for metaclasses
There is just one default metaclass, @code{eieio-default-superclass},
and you cannot define your own. The @code{:metaclass} tag in
@code{defclass} is ignored. Also, functions like `find-class', which
@code{defclass} is ignored. Also, functions like @code{find-class}, which
should return instances of the metaclass, behave differently in
@eieio{} in that they return symbols or plain structures instead.
......
......@@ -266,54 +266,54 @@ This is a summary of keystrokes available in every ERC buffer.
@table @kbd
@item C-a or <home> (`erc-bol')
@item C-a or <home> (@code{erc-bol})
Go to beginning of line or end of prompt.
@item RET (`erc-send-current-line')
@item RET (@code{erc-send-current-line})
Send the current line
@item TAB (`erc-complete-word')
@item TAB (@code{erc-complete-word})
If at prompt, complete the current word.
Otherwise, move to the next link or button.
@item M-TAB (`ispell-complete-word')
@item M-TAB (@code{ispell-complete-word})
Complete the given word, using ispell.
@item C-c C-a (`erc-bol')
@item C-c C-a (@code{erc-bol})
Go to beginning of line or end of prompt.
@item C-c C-b (`erc-iswitchb')
Use `iswitchb-read-buffer' to prompt for a ERC buffer to switch to.
@item C-c C-b (@code{erc-iswitchb})
Use @code{iswitchb-read-buffer} to prompt for a ERC buffer to switch to.
@item C-c C-c (`erc-toggle-interpret-controls')
@item C-c C-c (@code{erc-toggle-interpret-controls})
Toggle interpretation of control sequences in messages.
@item C-c C-d (`erc-input-action')
@item C-c C-d (@code{erc-input-action})
Interactively input a user action and send it to IRC.
@item C-c C-e (`erc-toggle-ctcp-autoresponse')
@item C-c C-e (@code{erc-toggle-ctcp-autoresponse})
Toggle automatic CTCP replies (like VERSION and PING).
@item C-c C-f (`erc-toggle-flood-control')
@item C-c C-f (@code{erc-toggle-flood-control})
Toggle use of flood control on sent messages.