Commit 2ab04b95 authored by Kenichi Handa's avatar Kenichi Handa
Browse files

merge trunk

parents a79703f5 58a70b94
2011-12-03 Paul Eggert <eggert@cs.ucla.edu>
* INSTALL.BZR: Mention configure -C, --disable-maintainer-mode.
Propagate configure flags to sub-configures.
* Makefile.in (cache_file, MAINTAINER_MODE_FLAG, CONFIGUREFLAGS):
New macros.
(config.status, bootstrap): Use them to propagate configure flags
to sub-configures.
* configure.in (cache_file): AC_SUBST this, for Makefile.in.
2011-12-03 Paul Eggert <eggert@cs.ucla.edu>
* .bzrignore: Add config.cache.
2011-11-27 Jan Djärv <jan.h.d@swipnet.se>
* configure.in: Check for gtk_window_set_has_resize_grip.
......@@ -8156,7 +8171,7 @@
1994-01-08 Roland McGrath (roland@churchy.gnu.ai.mit.edu)
* configure.in (creating src/Makefile): Put code inside 2nd arg to
AC_OUTPUT as it should be; hopefully noone will again see fit to
AC_OUTPUT as it should be; hopefully no one will again see fit to
gratuitously break this and not make a change log entry.
Optimized sed processing of Makefile.in and cpp output; now
preserves comments previously removed from the cpp input.
......
......@@ -28,6 +28,10 @@ options you can set):
$ ./configure
If you want later builds to go faster, at the expense of sometimes
doing the wrong thing if you update the build procedure, you can
invoke "./configure -C --disable-maintainer-mode" instead.
Some of the files that are included in the Emacs tarball, such as
byte-compiled Lisp files, are not stored in Bazaar. Therefore, to
build from Bazaar you must run "make bootstrap" instead of just "make":
......
......@@ -66,6 +66,11 @@ CDPATH=
# ==================== Things `configure' Might Edit ====================
MAINTAINER_MODE_FLAG = --disable-maintainer-mode
@MAINT@MAINTAINER_MODE_FLAG = --enable-maintainer-mode
cache_file = @cache_file@
CONFIGURE_FLAGS = --cache-file=$(cache_file) $(MAINTAINER_MODE_FLAG)
CC=@CC@
CFLAGS=@CFLAGS@
LDFLAGS=@LDFLAGS@
......@@ -404,7 +409,7 @@ config.status: ${srcdir}/configure ${srcdir}/lisp/version.el
if [ -x ./config.status ]; then \
./config.status --recheck; \
else \
./configure; \
./configure $(CONFIGURE_FLAGS); \
fi
AUTOCONF_INPUTS = @MAINT@ $(srcdir)/configure.in $(srcdir)/aclocal.m4
......@@ -936,7 +941,7 @@ bootstrap: bootstrap-clean FRC
if [ -x ./config.status ]; then \
./config.status; \
else \
./configure --enable-maintainer-mode; \
./configure $(CONFIGURE_FLAGS); \
fi
$(MAKE) $(MFLAGS) info all
......
......@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@ Copyright (C) 2001-2011 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
See the end of the file for license conditions.
This directory tree holds version 24.0.91 of GNU Emacs, the extensible,
This directory tree holds version 24.0.92 of GNU Emacs, the extensible,
customizable, self-documenting real-time display editor.
The file INSTALL in this directory says how to build and install GNU
......
......@@ -99,6 +99,7 @@ Eli Zaretskii
src/xfaces.c
src/xdisp.c
src/term.c
src/dispnew.c
src/frame.c
src/dired.c
......@@ -108,6 +109,7 @@ Eli Zaretskii
lisp/info.el
lisp/ls-lisp.el
lisp/startup.el
lisp/w32*.el
Stefan Monnier
src/intervals.c
......@@ -148,7 +150,6 @@ src/coding.c
src/composite.c
src/config.in
src/data.c
src/dispnew.c
src/doc.c
src/doprnt.c
src/ecrt0.c
......@@ -214,7 +215,6 @@ src/w32term.c
src/w32xfns.c
src/widget.c
src/window.c
src/xdisp.c
src/xfns.c
src/xmenu.c
src/xrdb.c
......
......@@ -67,7 +67,7 @@ minor_version ()
## $1 = program
## $2 = minimum version.
## Return 0 if program is present with version >= minumum version.
## Return 0 if program is present with version >= minimum version.
## Return 1 if program is missing.
## Return 2 if program is present but too old.
## Return 3 for unexpected error (eg failed to parse version).
......
......@@ -723,6 +723,7 @@ build_cpu = @build_cpu@
build_os = @build_os@
build_vendor = @build_vendor@
builddir = @builddir@
cache_file = @cache_file@
canonical = @canonical@
configuration = @configuration@
datadir = @datadir@
......
#! /bin/sh
# Guess values for system-dependent variables and create Makefiles.
# Generated by GNU Autoconf 2.65 for emacs 24.0.91.
# Generated by GNU Autoconf 2.65 for emacs 24.0.92.
#
#
# Copyright (C) 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001,
......@@ -549,8 +549,8 @@ MAKEFLAGS=
# Identity of this package.
PACKAGE_NAME='emacs'
PACKAGE_TARNAME='emacs'
PACKAGE_VERSION='24.0.91'
PACKAGE_STRING='emacs 24.0.91'
PACKAGE_VERSION='24.0.92'
PACKAGE_STRING='emacs 24.0.92'
PACKAGE_BUGREPORT=''
PACKAGE_URL=''
 
......@@ -1217,6 +1217,7 @@ build
PROFILING_CFLAGS
MAINT
GZIP_INFO
cache_file
am__untar
am__tar
AMTAR
......@@ -1884,7 +1885,7 @@ if test "$ac_init_help" = "long"; then
# Omit some internal or obsolete options to make the list less imposing.
# This message is too long to be a string in the A/UX 3.1 sh.
cat <<_ACEOF
\`configure' configures emacs 24.0.91 to adapt to many kinds of systems.
\`configure' configures emacs 24.0.92 to adapt to many kinds of systems.
 
Usage: $0 [OPTION]... [VAR=VALUE]...
 
......@@ -1958,7 +1959,7 @@ fi
 
if test -n "$ac_init_help"; then
case $ac_init_help in
short | recursive ) echo "Configuration of emacs 24.0.91:";;
short | recursive ) echo "Configuration of emacs 24.0.92:";;
esac
cat <<\_ACEOF
 
......@@ -2121,7 +2122,7 @@ fi
test -n "$ac_init_help" && exit $ac_status
if $ac_init_version; then
cat <<\_ACEOF
emacs configure 24.0.91
emacs configure 24.0.92
generated by GNU Autoconf 2.65
 
Copyright (C) 2009 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
......@@ -2843,7 +2844,7 @@ cat >config.log <<_ACEOF
This file contains any messages produced by compilers while
running configure, to aid debugging if configure makes a mistake.
 
It was created by emacs $as_me 24.0.91, which was
It was created by emacs $as_me 24.0.92, which was
generated by GNU Autoconf 2.65. Invocation command line was
 
$ $0 $@
......@@ -3676,7 +3677,7 @@ fi
 
# Define the identity of the package.
PACKAGE='emacs'
VERSION='24.0.91'
VERSION='24.0.92'
 
 
cat >>confdefs.h <<_ACEOF
......@@ -4070,6 +4071,9 @@ else
fi
 
 
## Makefile.in needs the cache file name.
## This is an option because I do not know if all info/man support
## compressed files, nor how to test if they do so.
 
......@@ -23104,7 +23108,7 @@ cat >>$CONFIG_STATUS <<\_ACEOF || ac_write_fail=1
# report actual input values of CONFIG_FILES etc. instead of their
# values after options handling.
ac_log="
This file was extended by emacs $as_me 24.0.91, which was
This file was extended by emacs $as_me 24.0.92, which was
generated by GNU Autoconf 2.65. Invocation command line was
 
CONFIG_FILES = $CONFIG_FILES
......@@ -23170,7 +23174,7 @@ _ACEOF
cat >>$CONFIG_STATUS <<_ACEOF || ac_write_fail=1
ac_cs_config="`$as_echo "$ac_configure_args" | sed 's/^ //; s/[\\""\`\$]/\\\\&/g'`"
ac_cs_version="\\
emacs config.status 24.0.91
emacs config.status 24.0.92
configured by $0, generated by GNU Autoconf 2.65,
with options \\"\$ac_cs_config\\"
 
......
......@@ -22,7 +22,7 @@ dnl You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
dnl along with GNU Emacs. If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.
AC_PREREQ(2.65)
AC_INIT(emacs, 24.0.91)
AC_INIT(emacs, 24.0.92)
AC_CONFIG_HEADER(src/config.h:src/config.in)
AC_CONFIG_SRCDIR(src/lisp.h)
AC_CONFIG_AUX_DIR(build-aux)
......@@ -182,6 +182,9 @@ OPTION_DEFAULT_ON([gnutls],[don't use -lgnutls for SSL/TLS support])
dnl http://lists.gnu.org/archive/html/emacs-devel/2008-04/msg01844.html
OPTION_DEFAULT_ON([makeinfo],[don't require makeinfo for building manuals])
## Makefile.in needs the cache file name.
AC_SUBST(cache_file)
## This is an option because I do not know if all info/man support
## compressed files, nor how to test if they do so.
OPTION_DEFAULT_ON([compress-info],[don't compress the installed Info pages])
......
2011-12-04 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
* programs.texi (Program Modes): Mention modes that are not
included with Emacs. Fix references to other manuals for tex.
Add index entry for backward-delete-char-untabify. Mention
prog-mode-hook.
(Which Function): Use "global minor mode" terminology.
(Basic Indent, Multi-line Indent): Refer to previous descriptions
in Indentation chapter to avoid duplication.
(Expressions): Copyedit.
(Matching): Document Electric Pair mode.
* ack.texi (Acknowledgments):
* rmail.texi (Movemail, Other Mailbox Formats):
* frames.texi (Frames): Don't capitalize "Unix".
2011-12-04 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
* text.texi (Nroff Mode): Mention what nroff is.
(Text Based Tables, Table Recognition): Don't say "Table mode"
since it's not a major or minor mode.
(Text Based Tables): Reduce the size of the example.
(Table Definition): Clarify definitions.
(Table Creation): Add key table.
(Cell Commands): Use kbd for commands.
(Table Rows and Columns): Combine nodes Row Commands and Column
Commands.
(Fixed Width Mode): Node deleted; contents moved to parent.
(Table Conversion): Shorten example.
(Measuring Tables): Merge into Table Misc.
2011-12-03 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
* text.texi (TeX Mode): Mention AUCTeX package.
(TeX Editing): Add xref to documentation for Occur.
(LaTeX Editing): Add xref to Completion node.
(TeX Print): Fix description of tex-directory.
(Enriched Text): Renamed from Formatted Text. Make this node and
its subnodes less verbose, since text/enriched files are
practically unused.
(Enriched Mode): Renamed from Requesting Formatted Text.
(Format Colors): Node deleted.
(Enriched Faces): Renamed from Format Faces. Describe commands
for applying colors too.
(Forcing Enriched Mode): Node deleted; merged into Enriched Mode.
* frames.texi (Menu Mouse Clicks): Tweak description of C-Mouse-2.
* display.texi (Colors): New node.
* cmdargs.texi (Colors X):
* xresources.texi (GTK styles):
* custom.texi (Face Customization): Reference it.
* glossary.texi (Glossary): Remove "formatted text" and "WYSIWYG".
Link to Fill Commands for Justification entry.
2011-12-03 Eli Zaretskii <eliz@gnu.org>
* display.texi (Auto Scrolling): More accurate description of what
scroll-*-aggressively does, including the effect of non-zero
margin. Fix "i.e." markup.
2011-12-02 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
* text.texi (Pages): Mention how formfeed chars are displayed.
(Auto Fill): Note convention for calling auto-fill-mode from Lisp.
Describe adaptive filling more precisely.
(Fill Commands): Note that filling removes excess whitespace.
(Text Mode): Note auto-mode-alist entries for Text mode. TAB is
now bound to indent-for-tab-command in Text mode.
(Outline Mode): Copyedits.
(Outline Visibility): Note that Reveal mode is a buffer-local
minor mode.
* modes.texi (Major Modes): Move note about checking major-mode in
a hook function here, from Text mode.
2011-11-28 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
* text.texi (Words): Add xref to Position Info.
......
......@@ -1272,8 +1272,8 @@ Colin Walters wrote Ibuffer, an enhanced buffer menu.
Barry Warsaw wrote @file{assoc.el}, a set of utility functions for
working with association lists; @file{cc-mode.el}, a mode for editing
C, C@t{++}, and Java code, based on earlier work by Dave Detlefs,
Stewart Clamen, and Richard Stallman; @file{elp.el}, a profiler
for Emacs Lisp programs; @file{man.el}, a mode for reading UNIX manual
Stewart Clamen, and Richard Stallman; @file{elp.el}, a profiler for
Emacs Lisp programs; @file{man.el}, a mode for reading Unix manual
pages; @file{regi.el}, providing an AWK-like functionality for use in
lisp programs; @file{reporter.el}, providing customizable bug
reporting for lisp packages; and @file{supercite.el}, a minor mode for
......
......@@ -69,7 +69,7 @@ arguments.)
* Environment:: Environment variables that Emacs uses.
* Display X:: Changing the default display and using remote login.
* Font X:: Choosing a font for text, under X.
* Colors:: Choosing display colors.
* Colors X:: Choosing display colors.
* Window Size X:: Start-up window size, under X.
* Borders X:: Internal and external borders, under X.
* Title X:: Specifying the initial frame's title.
......@@ -784,7 +784,7 @@ Use @var{font} as the default font.
When passing a font specification to Emacs on the command line, you
may need to ``quote'' it, by enclosing it in quotation marks, if it
contains characters that the shell treats specially (e.g. spaces).
contains characters that the shell treats specially (e.g.@: spaces).
For example:
@smallexample
......@@ -794,27 +794,14 @@ emacs -fn "DejaVu Sans Mono-12"
@xref{Fonts}, for other ways to specify the default font and font name
formats.
@node Colors
@node Colors X
@appendixsec Window Color Options
@cindex color of window, from command line
@cindex text colors, from command line
@findex list-colors-display
@cindex available colors
On a color display, you can specify which color to use for various
parts of the Emacs display. To find out what colors are available on
your system, type @kbd{M-x list-colors-display}, or press
@kbd{C-Mouse-2} and select @samp{Display Colors} from the pop-up menu.
(A particular window system might support many more colors, but the
list displayed by @code{list-colors-display} shows their portable
subset that can be safely used on any display supported by Emacs.)
If you do not specify colors, on windowed displays the default for the
background is white and the default for all other colors is black. On a
monochrome display, the foreground is black, the background is white,
and the border is gray if the display supports that. On terminals, the
background is usually black and the foreground is white.
Here is a list of the command-line options for specifying colors:
You can use the following command-line options to specify the colors
to use for various parts of the Emacs display. Colors may be
specified using either color names or RGB triplets (@pxref{Colors}).
@table @samp
@item -fg @var{color}
......@@ -822,15 +809,15 @@ background is usually black and the foreground is white.
@itemx --foreground-color=@var{color}
@opindex --foreground-color
@cindex foreground color, command-line argument
Specify the foreground color. @var{color} should be a standard color
name, or a numeric specification of the color's red, green, and blue
components as in @samp{#4682B4} or @samp{RGB:46/82/B4}.
Specify the foreground color, overriding the color specified by the
@code{default} face (@pxref{Faces}).
@item -bg @var{color}
@opindex -bg
@itemx --background-color=@var{color}
@opindex --background-color
@cindex background color, command-line argument
Specify the background color.
Specify the background color, overriding the color specified by the
@code{default} face.
@item -bd @var{color}
@opindex -bd
@itemx --border-color=@var{color}
......
......@@ -430,15 +430,8 @@ means that it's disabled. You can enable or disable the attribute by
clicking that button. When the attribute is enabled, you can change
the attribute value in the usual ways.
You can specify a color name (use @kbd{M-x list-colors-display} for
a list of them) or a hexadecimal color specification of the form
@samp{#@var{rr}@var{gg}@var{bb}}. (@samp{#000000} is black,
@samp{#ff0000} is red, @samp{#00ff00} is green, @samp{#0000ff} is
blue, and @samp{#ffffff} is white.) On a black-and-white display, the
colors you can use for the background are @samp{black}, @samp{white},
@samp{gray}, @samp{gray1}, and @samp{gray3}. Emacs supports these
shades of gray by using background stipple patterns instead of a
color.
The foreground and background colors can be specified using color
names or RGB triplets. @xref{Colors}.
Setting, saving and resetting a face work like the same operations for
variables (@pxref{Changing a Variable}).
......
......@@ -21,6 +21,7 @@ the text is displayed.
* View Mode:: Viewing read-only buffers.
* Follow Mode:: Follow mode lets two windows scroll as one.
* Faces:: How to change the display style using faces.
* Colors:: Specifying colors for faces.
* Standard Faces:: Emacs' predefined faces.
* Text Scale:: Increasing or decreasing text size in a buffer.
* Font Lock:: Minor mode for syntactic highlighting using faces.
......@@ -238,26 +239,32 @@ centered after scrolling.
@cindex aggressive scrolling
@vindex scroll-up-aggressively
@vindex scroll-down-aggressively
When the window does scroll by a longer distance, you can control
how aggressively it scrolls by setting the variables
@code{scroll-up-aggressively} and @code{scroll-down-aggressively}.
The value of @code{scroll-up-aggressively} should be either
@code{nil}, or a fraction @var{f} between 0 and 1. A fraction
specifies where on the screen to put point when scrolling upward,
i.e. forward. When point goes off the window end, the new start
position is chosen to put point @var{f} parts of the window height
from the bottom. Thus, larger @var{f} means more aggressive
scrolling: more new text is brought into view. The default value,
@code{nil}, is equivalent to 0.5.
When the window does scroll by a distance longer than
@code{scroll-step}, you can control how aggressively it scrolls by
setting the variables @code{scroll-up-aggressively} and
@code{scroll-down-aggressively}. The value of
@code{scroll-up-aggressively} should be either @code{nil}, or a
fraction @var{f} between 0 and 1. A fraction specifies where on the
screen to put point when scrolling upward, i.e.@: forward. When point
goes off the window end, the new start position is chosen to put point
@var{f} parts of the window height from the bottom margin. Thus,
larger @var{f} means more aggressive scrolling: more new text is
brought into view. The default value, @code{nil}, is equivalent to
0.5.
Likewise, @code{scroll-down-aggressively} is used for scrolling
down, i.e. backward. The value specifies how far point should be
placed from the top of the window; thus, as with
down, i.e.@: backward. The value specifies how far point should be
placed from the top margin of the window; thus, as with
@code{scroll-up-aggressively}, a larger value is more aggressive.
These two variables are ignored if either @code{scroll-step} or
@code{scroll-conservatively} are set to a non-zero value.
Note that @code{scroll-margin}, described below, limits the amount
of scrolling so as to put point outside of the top or bottom margin,
even if aggressive scrolling specifies a fraction @var{f} that is
larger than the window portion between the top and the bottom margins.
@vindex scroll-margin
The variable @code{scroll-margin} restricts how close point can come
to the top or bottom of a window. Its value is a number of screen
......@@ -455,7 +462,7 @@ one large window.
To turn off Follow mode, type @kbd{M-x follow-mode} a second time.
@node Faces
@section Faces: Controlling Text Display Style
@section Text Faces
@cindex faces
Emacs can display text in several different styles, called
......@@ -474,10 +481,8 @@ matching that regular expression (@pxref{Regexps}).
It's possible for a given face to look different in different
frames. For instance, some text-only terminals do not support all
face attributes, particularly font, height, and width, and some
support a limited range of colors. The @code{list-faces-display}
command shows the appearance for the selected frame.
support a limited range of colors.
@cindex face colors, setting
@cindex background color
@cindex default face
You can customize a face to alter its appearance, and save those
......@@ -492,25 +497,58 @@ background color.
You can also use X resources to specify attributes of any particular
face. @xref{Resources}.
Emacs can display variable-width fonts, but some Emacs commands,
particularly indentation commands, do not account for variable
character display widths. Therefore, we recommend not using
variable-width fonts for most faces, particularly those assigned by
Font Lock mode.
@node Colors
@section Colors for Faces
@cindex color name
@cindex RGB triplet
Faces can have various foreground and background colors. When you
specify a color for a face---for instance, when customizing the face
(@pxref{Face Customization})---you can use either a @dfn{color name}
or an @dfn{RGB triplet}.
@findex list-colors-display
A color name is a pre-defined name, such as @samp{dark orange} or
@samp{medium sea green}. To view a list of color names, type @kbd{M-x
list-colors-display}. If you run this command on a graphical display,
it shows the full range of color names known to Emacs (these are the
standard X11 color names, defined in X's @file{rgb.txt} file). If you
run the command on a text-only terminal, it shows only a small subset
of colors that can be safely displayed on such terminals. However,
Emacs understands X11 color names even on text-only terminals; if a
face is given a color specified by an X11 color name, it is displayed
using the closest-matching terminal color.
An RGB triplet is a string of the form @samp{#RRGGBB}. Each of the
R, G, and B components is a hexadecimal number specifying the
component's relative intensity, one to four digits long (usually two
digits are used). The components must have the same number of digits.
For hexadecimal values A to F, either upper or lower case are
acceptable.
The @kbd{M-x list-colors-display} command also shows the equivalent
RGB triplet for each named color. For instance, @samp{medium sea
green} is equivalent to @samp{#3CB371}.
@cindex face colors, setting
@findex set-face-foreground
@findex set-face-background
You can also change the foreground and background colors of a face
with @kbd{M-x set-face-foreground} and @kbd{M-x set-face-background}.
These commands prompt in the minibuffer for a face name and a color
name, with completion, and then set that face to use the specified
color (@pxref{Face Customization}, for information about color names).
You can change the foreground and background colors of a face with
@kbd{M-x set-face-foreground} and @kbd{M-x set-face-background}.
These commands prompt in the minibuffer for a face name and a color,
with completion, and then set that face to use the specified color.
They affect the face colors on all frames, but their effects do not
persist for future Emacs sessions, unlike using the customization
buffer or X resources. You can also use frame parameters to set
foreground and background colors for a specific frame; see @ref{Frame
foreground and background colors for a specific frame; @xref{Frame
Parameters}.
Emacs can display variable-width fonts, but some Emacs commands,
particularly indentation commands, do not account for variable
character display widths. Therefore, we recommend not using
variable-width fonts for most faces, particularly those assigned by
Font Lock mode.
@node Standard Faces
@section Standard Faces
......@@ -1016,13 +1054,13 @@ trailing whitespace in the region instead.
@cindex fringes, and unused line indication
On graphical displays, Emacs can indicate unused lines at the end of
the window with a small image in the left fringe (@pxref{Fringes}).
The image appears for window lines that do not correspond to any
buffer text. Blank lines at the end of the buffer then stand out
because they do not have this image in the fringe. To enable this
feature, set the buffer-local variable @code{indicate-empty-lines} to
a non-@code{nil} value. You can enable or disable this feature for
all new buffers by setting the default value of this variable,
e.g.@:@code{(setq-default indicate-empty-lines t)}.
The image appears for screen lines that do not correspond to any
buffer text, so blank lines at the end of the buffer stand out because
they lack this image. To enable this feature, set the buffer-local
variable @code{indicate-empty-lines} to a non-@code{nil} value. You
can enable or disable this feature for all new buffers by setting the
default value of this variable, e.g.@: @code{(setq-default
indicate-empty-lines t)}.
@node Selective Display
@section Selective Display
......@@ -1251,7 +1289,7 @@ as octal escape sequences instead of caret escape sequences.
Some non-@acronym{ASCII} characters have the same appearance as an
@acronym{ASCII} space or hyphen (minus) character. Such characters
can cause problems if they are entered into a buffer without your
realization, e.g. by yanking; for instance, source code compilers
realization, e.g.@: by yanking; for instance, source code compilers
typically do not treat non-@acronym{ASCII} spaces as whitespace
characters. To deal with this problem, Emacs displays such characters
specially: it displays @code{U+00A0} (no-break space) with the
......
......@@ -39,7 +39,7 @@ developing GNU and promoting software freedom.''
@c in general, keep the following line commented out, unless doing a
@c copy of this manual that will be published. The manual should go
@c onto the distribution in the full, 8.5 x 11" size.
@c @smallbook
@smallbook
@ifset smallbook
@smallbook
......@@ -113,25 +113,6 @@ Emacs Lisp Reference Manual}.
@insertcopying
@end ifnottex
@ignore
These subcategories have been deleted for simplicity
and to avoid conflicts.
Completion
Backup Files
Auto-Saving: Protection Against Disasters
Tags
Text Mode
Outline Mode
@TeX{} Mode
Formatted Text
Shell Command History
The ones for Dired and Rmail have had the items turned into :: items
to avoid conflicts.
Also Running Shell Commands from Emacs
and Sending Mail and Registers and Minibuffer.
@end ignore
@menu
* Distrib:: How to get the latest Emacs distribution.
* Intro:: An introduction to Emacs concepts.
......@@ -350,6 +331,7 @@ Controlling the Display
* View Mode:: Viewing read-only buffers.
* Follow Mode:: Follow mode lets two windows scroll as one.
* Faces:: How to change the display style using faces.
* Colors:: Specifying colors for faces.
* Standard Faces:: Emacs' predefined faces.
* Text Scale:: Increasing or decreasing text size in a buffer.
* Font Lock:: Minor mode for syntactic highlighting using faces.
......@@ -569,8 +551,8 @@ Commands for Human Languages
* TeX Mode:: Editing input to the formatter TeX.
* HTML Mode:: Editing HTML and SGML files.
* Nroff Mode:: Editing input to the formatter nroff.
* Formatted Text:: Editing formatted text directly in WYSIWYG fashion.
* Text Based Tables:: Editing text-based tables in WYSIWYG fashion.
* Enriched Text:: Editing text ``enriched'' with fonts, colors, etc.
* Text Based Tables:: Commands for editing text-based tables.
* Two-Column:: Splitting text columns into separate windows.
Filling Text
......@@ -597,18 +579,16 @@ Outline Mode
* TeX Print:: Commands for printing part of a file with TeX.
* TeX Misc:: Customization of TeX mode, and related features.