Commit 2ad80941 authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris
Browse files

Small lispref/markers.texi edits

* doc/lispref/markers.texi (Overview of Markers): Copyedits.
(Creating Markers): Update approximate example buffer size.
(The Mark): Don't mention uninteresting return values.
parent 763d4948
2012-03-07 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* markers.texi (Overview of Markers): Copyedits.
(Creating Markers): Update approximate example buffer size.
(The Mark): Don't mention uninteresting return values.
2012-03-05 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
* positions.texi (Text Lines): Document count-words.
......
@c -*-texinfo-*-
@c This is part of the GNU Emacs Lisp Reference Manual.
@c Copyright (C) 1990-1995, 1998-1999, 2001-2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@c Copyright (C) 1990-1995, 1998-1999, 2001-2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@c See the file elisp.texi for copying conditions.
@setfilename ../../info/markers
@node Markers, Text, Positions, Top
......@@ -27,8 +27,8 @@ deleted, so that it stays with the two characters on either side of it.
@node Overview of Markers
@section Overview of Markers
A marker specifies a buffer and a position in that buffer. The
marker can be used to represent a position in the functions that
A marker specifies a buffer and a position in that buffer. A
marker can be used to represent a position in functions that
require one, just as an integer could be used. In that case, the
marker's buffer is normally ignored. Of course, a marker used in this
way usually points to a position in the buffer that the function
......@@ -38,12 +38,12 @@ operates on, but that is entirely the programmer's responsibility.
A marker has three attributes: the marker position, the marker
buffer, and the insertion type. The marker position is an integer
that is equivalent (at a given time) to the marker as a position in
that buffer. But the marker's position value can change often during
the life of the marker. Insertion and deletion of text in the buffer
relocate the marker. The idea is that a marker positioned between two
characters remains between those two characters despite insertion and
deletion elsewhere in the buffer. Relocation changes the integer
equivalent of the marker.
that buffer. But the marker's position value can change during
the life of the marker, and often does. Insertion and deletion of
text in the buffer relocate the marker. The idea is that a marker
positioned between two characters remains between those two characters
despite insertion and deletion elsewhere in the buffer. Relocation
changes the integer equivalent of the marker.
@cindex marker relocation
Deleting text around a marker's position leaves the marker between the
......@@ -63,7 +63,7 @@ will continue to use time if they do point somewhere.
@cindex markers as numbers
Because it is common to perform arithmetic operations on a marker
position, most of the arithmetic operations (including @code{+} and
position, most of these operations (including @code{+} and
@code{-}) accept markers as arguments. In such cases, the marker
stands for its current position.
......@@ -188,7 +188,7 @@ chapter.
(point-min-marker)
@result{} #<marker at 1 in markers.texi>
(point-max-marker)
@result{} #<marker at 15573 in markers.texi>
@result{} #<marker at 24080 in markers.texi>
@end group
@group
......@@ -229,8 +229,8 @@ buffer.
@end group
@group
(copy-marker 20000)
@result{} #<marker at 7572 in markers.texi>
(copy-marker 90000)
@result{} #<marker at 24080 in markers.texi>
@end group
@end example
......@@ -509,7 +509,8 @@ example:
This function sets the current buffer's mark to @var{position}, and
pushes a copy of the previous mark onto @code{mark-ring}. If
@var{position} is @code{nil}, then the value of point is used.
@code{push-mark} returns @code{nil}.
@c Doesn't seem relevant.
@c @code{push-mark} returns @code{nil}.
The function @code{push-mark} normally @emph{does not} activate the
mark. To do that, specify @code{t} for the argument @var{activate}.
......@@ -523,8 +524,9 @@ This function pops off the top element of @code{mark-ring} and makes
that mark become the buffer's actual mark. This does not move point in
the buffer, and it does nothing if @code{mark-ring} is empty. It
deactivates the mark.
The return value is not meaningful.
@c
@c Seems even less relevant.
@c The return value is not meaningful.
@end defun
@defopt transient-mark-mode
......
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