Commit 2cbd16b9 authored by Werner LEMBERG's avatar Werner LEMBERG
Browse files

* calc.texi, cl.texi, gnus.texi, idlwave.texi, reftex.texi: Replace

`legal' with `valid'.
parent f8b00e0f
2005-03-25 Werner Lemberg <wl@gnu.org>
* calc.texi, cl.texi, gnus.texi, idlwave.texi, reftex.texi: Replace
`legal' with `valid'.
2005-03-25 Werner Lemberg <wl@gnu.org>
* calc.texi, reftex.texi: Replace `illegal' with `invalid'.
......
......@@ -13942,7 +13942,7 @@ Without being switched into C mode first, Calc would have misinterpreted
the brackets in @samp{a[1]} and @samp{a[2]}, would not have known that
@code{atan} was equivalent to Calc's built-in @code{arctan} function,
and would have written the formula back with notations (like implicit
multiplication) which would not have been legal for a C program.
multiplication) which would not have been valid for a C program.
 
As another example, suppose you are maintaining a C program and a La@TeX{}
document, each of which needs a copy of the same formula. You can grab the
......@@ -15472,7 +15472,7 @@ backslashes in tokens.)
This will parse @samp{3 bad token 4 /"\ 5} to @samp{silly(3,4,5)}.
 
The token @kbd{#} has a predefined meaning in Calc's formula parser;
it is not legal to use @samp{"#"} in a syntax rule. However, longer
it is not valid to use @samp{"#"} in a syntax rule. However, longer
tokens that include the @samp{#} character are allowed. Also, while
@samp{"$"} and @samp{"\""} are allowed as tokens, their presence in
the syntax table will prevent those characters from working in their
......@@ -23426,7 +23426,7 @@ is allowed only within @code{IntegRules}; it means ``integrate this
with respect to the same integration variable.'' If Calc is unable
to integrate @code{u}, the integration that invoked @code{IntegRules}
also fails. Thus integrating @samp{twice(f(x))} fails, returning the
unevaluated integral @samp{integ(twice(f(x)), x)}. It is still legal
unevaluated integral @samp{integ(twice(f(x)), x)}. It is still valid
to call @code{integ} with two or more arguments, however; in this case,
if @code{u} is not integrable, @code{twice} itself will still be
integrated: If the above rule is changed to @samp{... := twice(integ(u,x))},
......@@ -25273,7 +25273,7 @@ As a special feature, if the limits are infinite (or omitted, as
described above) but the formula includes vectors subscripted by
expressions that involve the iteration variable, Calc narrows
the limits to include only the range of integers which result in
legal subscripts for the vector. For example, the sum
valid subscripts for the vector. For example, the sum
@samp{sum(k [a,b,c,d,e,f,g]_(2k),k)} evaluates to @samp{b + 2 d + 3 f}.
 
The limits of a sum do not need to be integers. For example,
......@@ -28738,7 +28738,7 @@ command.
@kindex g A
@pindex calc-graph-add-3d
The @kbd{g A} (@code{calc-graph-add-3d}) command adds a 3D curve
to the graph. It is not legal to intermix 2D and 3D curves in a
to the graph. It is not valid to intermix 2D and 3D curves in a
single graph. This command takes three arguments, ``x'', ``y'',
and ``z'', from the stack. With a positive prefix @expr{n}, it
takes @expr{n+2} arguments (common ``x'' and ``y'', plus @expr{n}
......@@ -30503,7 +30503,7 @@ of mode setting, the second is a name for the mode itself, and
the third is the value in the form of a Lisp symbol, number,
or list. Annotations with unrecognizable text in the first or
second parts are ignored. The third part is not checked to make
sure the value is of a legal type or range; if you write an
sure the value is of a valid type or range; if you write an
annotation by hand, be sure to give a proper value or results
will be unpredictable. Mode-setting annotations are case-sensitive.
 
......@@ -31792,7 +31792,7 @@ to pop @var{num} values off the stack, resimplify them by calling
@code{calc-normalize}, and hand them to your function according to the
function's argument list. Your function may include @code{&optional} and
@code{&rest} parameters, so long as calling the function with @var{num}
parameters is legal.
parameters is valid.
 
Your function must return either a number or a formula in a form
acceptable to Calc, or a list of such numbers or formulas. These value(s)
......@@ -5,7 +5,7 @@
@copying
This file documents the GNU Emacs Common Lisp emulation package.
Copyright (C) 1993, 2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
Copyright (C) 1993, 2002, 2005 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@quotation
Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
......@@ -991,7 +991,7 @@ just as with @code{setq}. @code{setf} returns the value of the last
@var{form}.
The following Lisp forms will work as generalized variables, and
so may legally appear in the @var{place} argument of @code{setf}:
so may appear in the @var{place} argument of @code{setf}:
@itemize @bullet
@item
......@@ -1073,7 +1073,7 @@ x (point-max))} in this case).
@item
A call of the form @code{(substring @var{subplace} @var{n} [@var{m}])},
where @var{subplace} is itself a legal generalized variable whose
where @var{subplace} is itself a valid generalized variable whose
current value is a string, and where the value stored is also a
string. The new string is spliced into the specified part of the
destination string. For example:
......@@ -2379,7 +2379,7 @@ that they are exclusive rather than inclusive limits:
The @code{by} value is always positive, even for downward-counting
loops. Some sort of @code{from} value is required for downward
loops; @samp{for x downto 5} is not a legal loop clause all by
loops; @samp{for x downto 5} is not a valid loop clause all by
itself.
@item for @var{var} in @var{list} by @var{function}
......@@ -2481,7 +2481,7 @@ are also recognized but are equivalent to @code{symbols} in Emacs Lisp.
Due to a minor implementation restriction, it will not work to have
more than one @code{for} clause iterating over symbols, hash tables,
keymaps, overlays, or intervals in a given @code{loop}. Fortunately,
it would rarely if ever be useful to do so. It @emph{is} legal to mix
it would rarely if ever be useful to do so. It @emph{is} valid to mix
one of these types of clauses with other clauses like @code{for ... to}
or @code{while}.
......@@ -2727,7 +2727,7 @@ not automatically imply a return value. The loop must use some
explicit mechanism, such as @code{finally return}, to return
the accumulated result.
It is legal for several accumulation clauses of the same type to
It is valid for several accumulation clauses of the same type to
accumulate into the same place. From Steele:
@example
......@@ -3248,8 +3248,8 @@ In particular,
(get sym prop) @equiv{} (getf (symbol-plist sym) prop)
@end example
It is legal to use @code{getf} as a @code{setf} place, in which case
its @var{place} argument must itself be a legal @code{setf} place.
It is valid to use @code{getf} as a @code{setf} place, in which case
its @var{place} argument must itself be a valid @code{setf} place.
The @var{default} argument, if any, is ignored in this context.
The effect is to change (via @code{setcar}) the value cell in the
list that corresponds to @var{property}, or to cons a new property-value
......@@ -3535,7 +3535,7 @@ be an integer in which case the new object is seeded from that
integer; each different integer seed will result in a completely
different sequence of random numbers.
It is legal to print a @code{random-state} object to a buffer or
It is valid to print a @code{random-state} object to a buffer or
file and later read it back with @code{read}. If a program wishes
to use a sequence of pseudo-random numbers which can be reproduced
later for debugging, it can call @code{(make-random-state t)} to
......@@ -4575,7 +4575,7 @@ initialized from the corresponding argument. Slots whose names
do not appear in the argument list are initialized based on the
@var{default-value} in their slot descriptor. Also, @code{&optional}
and @code{&key} arguments which don't specify defaults take their
defaults from the slot descriptor. It is legal to include arguments
defaults from the slot descriptor. It is valid to include arguments
which don't correspond to slot names; these are useful if they are
referred to in the defaults for optional, keyword, or @code{&aux}
arguments which @emph{do} correspond to slots.
......
......@@ -8,7 +8,7 @@
 
@copying
Copyright (c) 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001,
2002, 2003, 2004
2002, 2003, 2004, 2005
Free Software Foundation, Inc.
 
@quotation
......@@ -18594,7 +18594,7 @@ that most will look for it here, this variable tells the summary
buffer how to maneuver around undownloaded (only headers stored in the
agent) and unfetched (neither article nor headers stored) articles.
 
The legal values are @code{nil} (maneuver to any article),
The valid values are @code{nil} (maneuver to any article),
@code{undownloaded} (maneuvering while unplugged ignores articles that
have not been fetched), @code{always-undownloaded} (maneuvering always
ignores articles that have not been fetched), @code{unfetched}
......
......@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@
@set IDLVERSION 6.1
@set NSYSROUTINES 1850
@set NSYSKEYWORDS 7685
@set DATE November, 2004
@set DATE March, 2005
@set AUTHOR J.D. Smith & Carsten Dominik
@set AUTHOR-EMAIL jdsmith@@as.arizona.edu
@set MAINTAINER J.D. Smith
......@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@ Emacs, and interacting with an IDL shell run as a subprocess.
This is edition @value{EDITION} of the IDLWAVE User Manual for IDLWAVE
@value{VERSION}
Copyright @copyright{} 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004 Free Software
Copyright @copyright{} 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005 Free Software
Foundation, Inc.
Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
......@@ -60,7 +60,7 @@ license to the document, as described in section 6 of the license.
This is edition @value{EDITION} of the @cite{IDLWAVE User Manual} for
IDLWAVE version @value{VERSION}, @value{DATE}.
@sp 2
Copyright @copyright{} 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004 Free Software
Copyright @copyright{} 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005 Free Software
Foundation, Inc.
@sp 2
@cindex Copyright, of IDLWAVE
......@@ -2204,7 +2204,7 @@ case of routines, keywords, classes, and methods as they are completed, see
@defopt idlwave-abbrev-change-case (@code{nil})
Non-@code{nil} means all abbrevs will be forced to either upper or lower
case. Legal values are @code{nil}, @code{t}, and @code{down}.
case. Valid values are @code{nil}, @code{t}, and @code{down}.
@end defopt
@defopt idlwave-reserved-word-upcase (@code{nil})
......@@ -2829,7 +2829,7 @@ provides faster access (@pxref{Electric Debug Mode}).
@defopt idlwave-shell-mark-breakpoints (@code{t})
Non-@code{nil} means mark breakpoints in the source file buffers. The
value indicates the preferred method. Legal values are @code{nil},
value indicates the preferred method. Valid values are @code{nil},
@code{t}, @code{face}, and @code{glyph}.
@end defopt
......@@ -2866,7 +2866,7 @@ been set (or you give two prefix arguments), the last command on the
@defopt idlwave-shell-mark-stop-line (@code{t})
Non-@code{nil} means mark the source code line where IDL is currently
stopped. The value specifies the preferred method. Legal values are
stopped. The value specifies the preferred method. Valid values are
@code{nil}, @code{t}, @code{arrow}, and @code{face}.
@end defopt
......
......@@ -737,7 +737,7 @@ the context of the label definition and constructs a label from
that@footnote{Note that the context may contain constructs which are
invalid in labels. @b{Ref@TeX{}} will therefore strip the accent from
accented Latin-1 characters and remove everything else which is not
legal in labels. This mechanism is safe, but may not be satisfactory
valid in labels. This mechanism is safe, but may not be satisfactory
for non-western languages. Check the following variables if you need to
change things: @code{reftex-translate-to-ascii-function},
@code{reftex-derive-label-parameters}, @code{reftex-label-illegal-re},
......@@ -2833,7 +2833,7 @@ to be changed for other languages. See the variables
@vindex reftex-translate-to-ascii-function
@vindex reftex-label-illegal-re
Also, when a label is derived from context, @b{Ref@TeX{}} clears the
context string from non-ASCII characters in order to make a legal label.
context string from non-ASCII characters in order to make a valid label.
If there should ever be a version of @TeX{} which allows extended
characters @emph{in labels}, then we will have to look at the
variables @code{reftex-translate-to-ascii-function} and
......@@ -4120,7 +4120,7 @@ Flags governing label insertion. The value has the form
If @var{derive}is @code{t}, @b{Ref@TeX{}} will try to derive a sensible
label from context. A section label for example will be derived from
the section heading. The conversion of the context to a legal label is
the section heading. The conversion of the context to a valid label is
governed by the specifications given in
@code{reftex-derive-label-parameters}. If @var{derive} is @code{nil},
the default label will consist of the prefix and a unique number, like
......@@ -4166,7 +4166,7 @@ buffer.
@end deffn
@deffn Hook reftex-string-to-label-function
Function to turn an arbitrary string into a legal label.
Function to turn an arbitrary string into a valid label.
@b{Ref@TeX{}}'s default function uses the variable
@code{reftex-derive-label-parameters}.
@end deffn
......@@ -4174,7 +4174,7 @@ Function to turn an arbitrary string into a legal label.
@deffn Hook reftex-translate-to-ascii-function
Filter function which will process a context string before it is used to
derive a label from it. The intended application is to convert ISO or
Mule characters into something legal in labels. The default function
Mule characters into something valid in labels. The default function
@code{reftex-latin1-to-ascii} removes the accents from Latin-1
characters. X-Symbol (>=2.6) sets this variable to the much more
general @code{x-symbol-translate-to-ascii}.
......@@ -4558,7 +4558,7 @@ indexing from the phrase buffer.
The final entry may also be a symbol. It must have an association in
the variable @code{reftex-index-macros-builtin} to specify the main
indexing package you are using. Legal values are currently
indexing package you are using. Valid values are currently
@example
default @r{The LaTeX default - unnecessary to specify this one}
multind @r{The multind.sty package}
......@@ -4590,7 +4590,7 @@ Default index tag. When working with multiple indexes, RefTeX queries
for an index tag when creating index entries or displaying a specific
index. This variable controls the default offered for these queries.
The default can be selected with @key{RET} during selection or
completion. Legal values of this variable are:
completion. Valid values of this variable are:
@example
nil @r{Do not provide a default index}
"tag" @r{The default index tag given as a string, e.g. "idx"}
......@@ -4830,9 +4830,9 @@ This is a list of items, each item is like:
@example
@var{type}: @r{File type like @code{"bib"} or @code{"tex"}.}
@var{def-ext}: @r{The default extension for that file type, like @code{".tex"} or @code{".bib"}.}
@var{other-ext}: @r{Any number of other legal extensions for this file type.}
@var{other-ext}: @r{Any number of other valid extensions for this file type.}
@end example
When a files is searched and it does not have any of the legal extensions,
When a files is searched and it does not have any of the valid extensions,
we try the default extension first, and then the naked file name.
@end defopt
......@@ -5457,7 +5457,7 @@ lowercase labels (default @code{t}).
All @file{.rel} files have a final newline to avoid queries.
@item
Single byte representations of accented European letters (ISO-8859-1)
are now legal in labels.
are now valid in labels.
@end itemize
@noindent @b{Version 3.33}
......
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