Commit 2e66e5b7 authored by Reiner Steib's avatar Reiner Steib
Browse files

* custom.texi (File Variables): Add `unibyte' and make it more

clear that `unibyte' and `coding' are special.  Suggested by Simon
Krahnke <overlord@gmx.li>.

* mule.texi (Enabling Multibyte): Refer to File Variables.
Suggested by Simon Krahnke <overlord@gmx.li>.
parent 2ec7f67a
2004-11-29 Reiner Steib <Reiner.Steib@gmx.de>
* custom.texi (File Variables): Add `unibyte' and make it more
clear that `unibyte' and `coding' are special. Suggested by Simon
Krahnke <overlord@gmx.li>.
* mule.texi (Enabling Multibyte): Refer to File Variables.
Suggested by Simon Krahnke <overlord@gmx.li>.
2004-11-26 Jan Dj,Ad(Brv <jan.h.d@swipnet.se>
* frames.texi (Dialog Boxes): Rename use-old-gtk-file-dialog to
......
......@@ -961,7 +961,8 @@ numeric values:
You can also specify the coding system for a file in this way: just
specify a value for the ``variable'' named @code{coding}. The ``value''
must be a coding system name that Emacs recognizes. @xref{Coding
Systems}.
Systems}. @w{@samp{unibyte: t}} specifies unibyte loading for a
particular Lisp file. @xref{Enabling Multibyte}.
The @code{eval} pseudo-variable, described below, can be specified in
the first line as well.
......@@ -1022,14 +1023,15 @@ Here's an example of doing this:
# End:
@end example
Two ``variable names'' have special meanings in a local variables
Some ``variable names'' have special meanings in a local variables
list: a value for the variable @code{mode} really sets the major mode,
and a value for the variable @code{eval} is simply evaluated as an
expression and the value is ignored. @code{mode} and @code{eval} are
not real variables; setting variables named @code{mode} and @code{eval}
in any other context has no special meaning. @emph{If @code{mode} is
used to set a major mode, it should be the first ``variable'' in the
list.} Otherwise, the entries that precede it in the list of the local
expression and the value is ignored. @code{coding}, @code{unibyte},
@code{mode} and @code{eval} are not real variables; setting variables
named @code{coding}, @code{unibyte}, @code{mode} and @code{eval} in any
other context has no special meaning. @emph{If @code{mode} is used to
set a major mode, it should be the first ``variable'' in the list.}
Otherwise, the entries that precede it in the list of the local
variables are likely to be ignored, since most modes kill all local
variables as part of their initialization.
......
......@@ -195,15 +195,15 @@ initialization from the values of environment variables,
characters.
Emacs normally loads Lisp files as multibyte, regardless of whether
you used @samp{--unibyte}. This includes the Emacs initialization
file, @file{.emacs}, and the initialization files of Emacs packages
such as Gnus. However, you can specify unibyte loading for a
particular Lisp file, by putting @w{@samp{-*-unibyte: t;-*-}} in a
comment on the first line. Then that file is always loaded as unibyte
text, even if you did not start Emacs with @samp{--unibyte}. The
motivation for these conventions is that it is more reliable to always
load any particular Lisp file in the same way. However, you can load
a Lisp file as unibyte, on any one occasion, by typing @kbd{C-x
you used @samp{--unibyte}. This includes the Emacs initialization file,
@file{.emacs}, and the initialization files of Emacs packages such as
Gnus. However, you can specify unibyte loading for a particular Lisp
file, by putting @w{@samp{-*-unibyte: t;-*-}} in a comment on the first
line (@pxref{File Variables}). Then that file is always loaded as
unibyte text, even if you did not start Emacs with @samp{--unibyte}.
The motivation for these conventions is that it is more reliable to
always load any particular Lisp file in the same way. However, you can
load a Lisp file as unibyte, on any one occasion, by typing @kbd{C-x
@key{RET} c raw-text @key{RET}} immediately before loading it.
The mode line indicates whether multibyte character support is enabled
......
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