Commit 2e6d3a80 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

Move the Refill Mode node.

Move the TeX mode miscellany to a new node.
Clean up the Foldout node.
Other minor changes.
parent 2e2cdb68
......@@ -50,7 +50,7 @@ Then the formatting appears on the screen in Emacs while you edit.
@xref{Formatted Text}.
@end iftex
The `automatic typing' features may be useful when writing text.
The ``automatic typing'' features may be useful when writing text.
@xref{Top, Autotyping, autotype, Features for Automatic Typing}.
@menu
......@@ -388,11 +388,11 @@ Text}).
@menu
* Auto Fill:: Auto Fill mode breaks long lines automatically.
* Refill:: Keeping paragraphs filled.
* Fill Commands:: Commands to refill paragraphs and center lines.
* Fill Prefix:: Filling paragraphs that are indented
or in a comment, etc.
* Adaptive Fill:: How Emacs can determine the fill prefix automatically.
* Refill:: Keeping paragraphs filled.
@end menu
@node Auto Fill
......@@ -453,6 +453,25 @@ paragraph properly filled again is usually with the explicit fill commands.
The section on init files says how to arrange this permanently for yourself.
@xref{Init File}.
@node Refill
@subsection Refill Mode
@cindex refilling text, word processor style
@cindex modes, Refill
@cindex Refill minor mode
Refill minor mode provides support for keeping paragraphs filled as
you type or modify them in other ways. It provides an effect similar
to typical word processor behaviour. This works by running a
paragraph-filling command at suitable times.
When you are typing text, only characters which normally trigger
auto filling, like the space character, will trigger refilling. This
is to avoid making it too slow. Apart from self-inserting characters,
other commands which modify the text cause refilling.
The current implementation is preliminary and probably not robust.
We expect to improve on it.
@node Fill Commands
@subsection Explicit Fill Commands
......@@ -534,10 +553,10 @@ two spaces for the end of a sentence, as explained above. @xref{Sentences}.
fill commands put two spaces after a colon.
@vindex sentence-end-without-period
The variable @code{sentence-end-without-period} can be set
non-@code{nil} to indicate that a sentence will end without a period.
For example, a sentence in Thai text ends with double space but without
a period.
Some languages do not use period to indicate end of sentence. For
example, a sentence in Thai text ends with double space but without a
period. Set the variable @code{sentence-end-without-period} to
@code{t} to tell the sentence commands that a period is not necessary.
@node Fill Prefix
@subsection The Fill Prefix
......@@ -699,25 +718,6 @@ line, and it should return the appropriate fill prefix based on that
line. If it returns @code{nil}, that means it sees no fill prefix in
that line.
@node Refill
@subsection Refill Mode
@cindex refilling text, word processor style
@cindex modes, Refill
@cindex Refill minor mode
Refill minor mode provides support for keeping paragraphs filled as you
type or modify them in other ways. It provides an effect similar to
typical word processor behaviour. This works by running a
paragraph-filling command at suitable times.
When you are typing text, only characters which normally trigger auto
filling, like the space character, will trigger refilling. This is to
avoid making it too slow. Apart from self-inserting characters, other
commands which modify the text cause refilling.
The current implementation is preliminary and probably not robust. We
expect to improve on it.
@node Case
@section Case Conversion Commands
@cindex case conversion
......@@ -962,12 +962,12 @@ so that Outline mode will know that sections are contained in chapters.
This works as long as no other command starts with @samp{@@chap}.
@vindex outline-level
It is possible to change the rule for calculating the level of a
heading line by setting the variable @code{outline-level}. The value of
You can change the rule for calculating the level of a heading line
by setting the variable @code{outline-level}. The value of
@code{outline-level} should be a function that takes no arguments and
returns the level of the current heading. Some major modes such as C,
Nroff, and Emacs Lisp mode set this variable and/or
@code{outline-regexp} in order to work with Outline minor mode.
Nroff, and Emacs Lisp mode set this variable and @code{outline-regexp}
in order to work with Outline minor mode.
@node Outline Motion
@subsection Outline Motion Commands
......@@ -1149,28 +1149,23 @@ want more than two views on the same outline, create additional indirect
buffers.
@node Foldout
@subsection Folding editing
@subsection Folding Editing
@cindex folding editing
The Foldout package provides folding editor extensions for Outline mode
and Outline minor mode. It may be used by putting in your @file{.emacs}
The Foldout package extends Outline mode and Outline minor mode with
``folding'' commands. The idea of folding is that you zoom in on a
nested portion of the outline, while hiding its relatives at higher
levels.
@example
(eval-after-load "outline" '(require 'foldout))
@end example
@noindent
Folding editing works as follows.
Consider an Outline mode buffer all the text and subheadings under
Consider an Outline mode buffer all the text and subheadings under
level-1 headings hidden. To look at what is hidden under one of these
headings normally you would use @kbd{C-c C-e} (@kbd{M-x show-entry}) to
expose the body or @kbd{C-c C-i} to expose the child (level-2) headings.
headings, you could use @kbd{C-c C-e} (@kbd{M-x show-entry}) to expose
the body, or @kbd{C-c C-i} to expose the child (level-2) headings.
@kindex C-c C-z
@findex foldout-zoom-subtree
With Foldout, you use @kbd{C-c C-z} (@kbd{M-x foldout-zoom-subtree}).
This exposes the body and child subheadings and narrows the buffer so
With Foldout, you use @kbd{C-c C-z} (@kbd{M-x foldout-zoom-subtree}).
This exposes the body and child subheadings, and narrows the buffer so
that only the level-1 heading, the body and the level-2 headings are
visible. Now to look under one of the level-2 headings, position the
cursor on it and use @kbd{C-c C-z} again. This exposes the level-2 body
......@@ -1178,7 +1173,7 @@ and its level-3 child subheadings and narrows the buffer again. Zooming
in on successive subheadings can be done as much as you like. A string
in the modeline shows how deep you've gone.
When zooming in on a heading, to see only the child subheadings specify
When zooming in on a heading, to see only the child subheadings specify
a numeric argument: @kbd{C-u C-c C-z}. The number of levels of children
can be specified too (compare @kbd{M-x show-children}), e.g.@: @kbd{M-2
C-c C-z} exposes two levels of child subheadings. Alternatively, the
......@@ -1186,65 +1181,76 @@ body can be spcified with a negative argument: @kbd{M-- C-c C-z}. The
whole subtree can be expanded, similarly to @kbd{C-c C-s} (@kbd{M-x
show-subtree}), by specifying a zero argument: @kbd{M-0 C-c C-z}.
While you're zoomed in you can still use outline-mode's exposure and
While you're zoomed in, you can still use Outline mode's exposure and
hiding functions without disturbing Foldout. Also, since the buffer is
narrowed, `global' editing actions will only affect text under the
narrowed, ``global'' editing actions will only affect text under the
zoomed-in heading. This is useful for restricting changes to a
particular chapter or section of your document.
@kindex C-c C-x
@findex foldout-exit-fold
Unzoom (exit) a fold using @kbd{C-c C-x} (@kbd{M-x foldout-exit-fold}).
To unzoom (exit) a fold, use @kbd{C-c C-x} (@kbd{M-x foldout-exit-fold}).
This hides all the text and subheadings under the top-level heading and
returns you to the previous view of the buffer. Specifying a numeric
argument exits that many folds. Specifying a zero argument exits all
argument exits that many levels of folds. Specifying a zero argument exits all
folds.
You might want to exit a fold without hiding the text and subheadings,
specify a negative argument. For example, @kbd{M--2 C-c C-x} exits two
folds and leaves the text and subheadings exposed.
To cancel the narrowing of a fold without hiding the text and
subheadings, specify a negative argument. For example, @kbd{M--2 C-c
C-x} exits two folds and leaves the text and subheadings exposed.
Foldout mode also provides mouse commands for entering and exiting
folds, and for showing and hiding text:
Foldout provides mouse bindings for entering and exiting folds and for
showing and hiding text as follows:
@table @asis
@item @kbd{M-C-mouse-1} zooms in on the heading clicked on
@item @kbd{M-C-Mouse-1} zooms in on the heading clicked on
@table @asis
@item single click
expose body
expose body.
@item double click
expose subheadings
expose subheadings.
@item triple click
expose body and subheadings
expose body and subheadings.
@item quad click
expose entire subtree
expose entire subtree.
@end table
@item @kbd{M-C-mouse-2} exposes text under the heading clicked on
@item @kbd{M-C-Mouse-2} exposes text under the heading clicked on
@table @r
@item single click
expose body
expose body.
@item double click
expose subheadings
expose subheadings.
@item triple click
expose body and subheadings
expose body and subheadings.
@item quad click
expose entire subtree
expose entire subtree.
@end table
@item @kbd{M-C-mouse-3} hides text under the heading clicked on or exits fold
@item @kbd{M-C-Mouse-3} hides text under the heading clicked on or exits fold
@table @r
@item single click
hide subtree
hide subtree.
@item double click
exit fold and hide text
exit fold and hide text.
@item triple click
exit fold without hiding text
exit fold without hiding text.
@item quad click
exit all folds and hide text
exit all folds and hide text.
@end table
@end table
@vindex foldout-mouse-modifiers
You can change the modifier keys used by setting
@code{foldout-mouse-modifiers}.
You can specify different modifier keys (instead of
@kbd{Control-Meta-}) by setting @code{foldout-mouse-modifiers}; but if
you have already loaded the @file{foldout.el} library, you must reload
it in order for this to take effect.
To use the Foldout package, you can type @kbd{M-x load-library
@key{RET} foldout @key{RET}}; or you can arrange for to do that
automatically by putting this in your @file{.emacs} file:
@example
(eval-after-load "outline" '(require 'foldout))
@end example
@node TeX Mode, Nroff Mode, Outline Mode, Text
@section @TeX{} Mode
......@@ -1285,61 +1291,11 @@ If the contents are insufficient to determine this, the variable
slitex-mode} to select explicitly the particular variants of @TeX{}
mode.
@vindex tex-shell-hook
@vindex tex-mode-hook
@vindex latex-mode-hook
@vindex slitex-mode-hook
@vindex plain-tex-mode-hook
Entering any kind of @TeX{} mode runs the hooks @code{text-mode-hook}
and @code{tex-mode-hook}. Then it runs either
@code{plain-tex-mode-hook} or @code{latex-mode-hook}, whichever is
appropriate. For Sli@TeX{} files, it calls @code{slitex-mode-hook}.
Starting the @TeX{} shell runs the hook @code{tex-shell-hook}.
@xref{Hooks}.
@findex iso-iso2tex
@findex iso-tex2iso
@findex iso-iso2gtex
@findex iso-gtex2iso
@cindex Latin-1 @TeX{} encoding
@TeX{} encoding
@vindex format-alist
@findex format-find-file
The commands @kbd{M-x iso-iso2tex}, @kbd{M-x iso-tex2iso}, @kbd{M-x
iso-iso2gtex} and @kbd{M-x iso-gtex2iso} can be used to convert between
Latin-1 encoded files and @TeX{}-encoded equivalents. They are included
by default in the @code{format-alist} variable, and so an be used with
@kbd{M-x format-find-file}, for instance.
@findex tildify-buffer
@findex tildify-region
@cindex ties, @TeX{}, inserting
@cindex hard spaces, @TeX{}, inserting
@cindex SGML
@cindex HTML
The commands @kbd{M-x tildify-buffer} and @kbd{M-x tildify-region} can
be used to insert missing @samp{~} @dfn{tie} characters which should be
present in the file to represent `hard spaces'. This is set up for
Czech---customize the group @samp{tildify} for other languages or for
other sorts of markup; there is support for SGML (HTML).
@cindex RefTeX package
@cindex references, La@TeX{}
@cindex La@TeX{} references
For managing all kinds of references for La@TeX{}, you can use
Ref@TeX{}. @xref{Top, , RefTeX, reftex}.
@cindex Bib@TeX{} mode
@cindex mode, Bib@TeX{}
@pindex bibtex
@findex bibtex-mode
There is also a mode for editing files for the Bib@TeX{} bibliography
program often used with La@TeX{}.
@menu
* Editing: TeX Editing. Special commands for editing in TeX mode.
* LaTeX: LaTeX Editing. Additional commands for LaTeX input files.
* Printing: TeX Print. Commands for printing part of a file with TeX.
* Misc: TeX Misc. Customization of TeX mode, and related features.
@end menu
@node TeX Editing
......@@ -1630,6 +1586,57 @@ current buffer's file. Generally, you need to do @kbd{C-c C-f}
@kbd{C-c TAB} (@code{tex-bibtex-file}), and then repeat @kbd{C-c C-f}
(@code{tex-file}) twice more to get the cross-references correct.
@node TeX Misc
@subsection @TeX{} Mode Miscellany
@vindex tex-shell-hook
@vindex tex-mode-hook
@vindex latex-mode-hook
@vindex slitex-mode-hook
@vindex plain-tex-mode-hook
Entering any variant of @TeX{} mode runs the hooks
@code{text-mode-hook} and @code{tex-mode-hook}. Then it runs either
@code{plain-tex-mode-hook}, @code{latex-mode-hook}, or
@code{slitex-mode-hook}, whichever is appropriate. Starting the
@TeX{} shell runs the hook @code{tex-shell-hook}. @xref{Hooks}.
@findex iso-iso2tex
@findex iso-tex2iso
@findex iso-iso2gtex
@findex iso-gtex2iso
@cindex Latin-1 @TeX{} encoding
@TeX{} encoding
@vindex format-alist
@findex format-find-file
The commands @kbd{M-x iso-iso2tex}, @kbd{M-x iso-tex2iso}, @kbd{M-x
iso-iso2gtex} and @kbd{M-x iso-gtex2iso} can be used to convert
between Latin-1 encoded files and @TeX{}-encoded equivalents.
@ignore
@c Too cryptic to be useful, too cryptic for me to make it better -- rms.
They
are included by default in the @code{format-alist} variable, so they
can be used with @kbd{M-x format-find-file}, for instance.
@end ignore
@ignore @c Not worth documenting if it is only for Czech -- rms.
@findex tildify-buffer
@findex tildify-region
@cindex ties, @TeX{}, inserting
@cindex hard spaces, @TeX{}, inserting
@cindex SGML
@cindex HTML
The commands @kbd{M-x tildify-buffer} and @kbd{M-x tildify-region}
insert @samp{~} (@dfn{tie}) characters where they are conventionally
required. This is set up for Czech---customize the group
@samp{tildify} for other languages or for other sorts of markup.
@end ignore
@cindex Ref@TeX{} package
@cindex references, La@TeX{}
@cindex La@TeX{} references
For managing all kinds of references for La@TeX{}, you can use
Ref@TeX{}. @xref{Top, , RefTeX, reftex}.
@node Nroff Mode
@section Nroff Mode
......@@ -1805,7 +1812,7 @@ text file: with keyboard commands, and with the mouse.
The easiest way to add properties to your document is by using the Text
Properties menu. You can get to this menu in two ways: from the Edit
menu in the menu bar, or with @kbd{C-mouse-2} (hold the @key{CTRL} key
menu in the menu bar, or with @kbd{C-Mouse-2} (hold the @key{CTRL} key
and press the middle mouse button).
Most of the items in the Text Properties menu lead to other submenus.
......
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