Commit 31cc861c authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris

* doc/misc/faq.texi: Convert @inforefs to @xrefs.

Fix some malformed cross-references.
parent 52af8e0a
2012-04-28 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* faq.texi: Convert @inforefs to @xrefs.
Fix some malformed cross-references.
2012-04-26 Ippei Furuhashi <top.tuna+orgmode@gmail.com> (tiny change)
* org.texi (Agenda commands): Fix two typos: give corresponding
......
......@@ -195,8 +195,7 @@ pressed.}.
Also, on very few keyboards does @kbd{C-?} generate @acronym{ASCII} code 127.
@c FIXME I cannot understand the previous sentence.
@inforef{Keys, Keys, emacs}, for more information. (@xref{Emacs
manual}, for more information about Info.)
@xref{Keys,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}.
@node Extended commands
@section What does @file{M-x @var{command}} mean?
......@@ -1338,7 +1337,7 @@ of files from Macintosh, Microsoft, and Unix platforms.
@cindex Init file, setting up
@cindex Customization file, setting up
@inforef{Init File, Init File, emacs}.
@xref{Init File,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}.
In general, new Emacs users should not be provided with @file{.emacs}
files, because this can cause confusing non-standard behavior. Then
......@@ -1353,8 +1352,8 @@ rather than Lisp code.
While Customize might indeed make it easier to configure Emacs,
consider taking a bit of time to learn Emacs Lisp and modifying your
@file{.emacs} directly. Simple configuration options are described
rather completely in @inforef{Init File, Init File, emacs}, for users
interested in performing frequently requested, basic tasks.
rather completely in @ref{Init File,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual},
for users interested in performing frequently requested, basic tasks.
Sometimes users are unsure as to where their @file{.emacs} file should
be found. Visiting the file as @file{~/.emacs} from Emacs will find
......@@ -1370,7 +1369,7 @@ The main Customize entry point is @kbd{M-x customize @key{RET}}. This
command takes you to a buffer listing all the available Customize
groups. From there, you can access all customizable options and faces,
change their values, and save your changes to your init file.
@inforef{Easy Customization, Easy Customization, emacs}.
@xref{Easy Customization,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}.
If you know the name of the group in advance (e.g. ``shell''), use
@kbd{M-x customize-group @key{RET}}.
......@@ -1675,16 +1674,16 @@ M-x replace-regexp @key{RET} [^ @key{TAB} C-q @key{LFD} C-q @key{RET} C-q C-l @k
@cindex Searching for newlines
@cindex Replacing newlines
Use @kbd{C-q C-j}. For more information, see @inforef{Special Isearch,
Special Input for Incremental Search, emacs}.
Use @kbd{C-q C-j}. For more information,
@pxref{Special Isearch,, Special Input for Incremental Search, emacs,
The GNU Emacs Manual}.
@node Yanking text in isearch
@section How do I copy text from the kill ring into the search string?
@cindex Yanking text into the search string
@cindex isearch yanking
Use @kbd{M-y}. @inforef{Isearch Yank, Isearch Yanking, emacs}.
Use @kbd{M-y}. @xref{Isearch Yank,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}.
@node Wrapping words automatically
@section How do I make Emacs wrap words for me?
......@@ -2133,7 +2132,7 @@ commands you've typed.
To repeat a set of commands, use keyboard macros. Use @kbd{C-x (} and
@kbd{C-x )} to make a keyboard macro that invokes the command and then
type @kbd{C-x e}. (@inforef{Keyboard Macros, Keyboard Macros, emacs}.)
type @kbd{C-x e}. @xref{Keyboard Macros,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}.
If you're really desperate for the @code{.} command in @code{vi} that
redoes the last insertion/deletion, use VIPER, a @code{vi} emulation
......@@ -2145,7 +2144,7 @@ mode which comes with Emacs, and which appears to support it.
@cindex X resources
@cindex Setting X resources
@inforef{X Resources, X Resources, emacs}.
@xref{X Resources,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}.
You can also use a resource editor, such as editres (for X11R5 and
onwards), to look at the resource names for the menu bar, assuming Emacs
......@@ -2256,7 +2255,7 @@ See also the variable @code{track-eol} and the command
@cindex Suspending Emacs
@kbd{C-z} iconifies Emacs when running under X and suspends Emacs
otherwise. @inforef{Frame Commands, Frame Commands, emacs}.
otherwise. @xref{Frame Commands,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}.
@node Using regular expressions
@section How do I use regexps (regular expressions) in Emacs?
......@@ -2266,7 +2265,7 @@ otherwise. @inforef{Frame Commands, Frame Commands, emacs}.
@cindex Unix regexps, differences from Emacs
@cindex Text strings, putting regexps in
@inforef{Regexp Backslash, Regexp Backslash, emacs}.
@xref{Regexp Backslash,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}.
The @code{or} operator is @samp{\|}, not @samp{|}, and the grouping operators
are @samp{\(} and @samp{\)}. Also, the string syntax for a backslash is
......@@ -2323,7 +2322,7 @@ To accept all replacements in each file, hit @kbd{!}.
Another way to do the same thing is to use the ``tags'' feature of
Emacs: it includes the command @code{tags-query-replace} which performs
a query-replace across all the files mentioned in the @file{TAGS} file.
@inforef{Tags Search, Tags Search, emacs}.
@xref{Tags Search,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}.
@node Documentation for etags
@section Where is the documentation for @code{etags}?
......@@ -2366,8 +2365,8 @@ the Unix shell, try GNU @code{ls} with the @samp{-B} option. GNU
@code{ls} is part of the GNU Fileutils package, available from
@samp{ftp.gnu.org} and its mirrors (@pxref{Current GNU distributions}).
To disable or change the way backups are made, @inforef{Backup Names, ,
emacs}.
To disable or change the way backups are made,
@pxref{Backup Names,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}.
@cindex Backup files in a single directory
Beginning with Emacs 21.1, you can control where Emacs puts backup files
......@@ -2397,8 +2396,8 @@ package (@pxref{Packages that do not come with Emacs}). This
package also allows you to place all auto-save files in one directory,
such as @file{/tmp}.
To disable or change how @code{auto-save-mode} works, @inforef{Auto
Save, , emacs}.
To disable or change how @code{auto-save-mode} works,
@pxref{Auto Save,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}.
@node Going to a line by number
@section How can I go to a certain line given its number?
......@@ -2621,7 +2620,7 @@ consult the documentation of the variables @code{ps-printer-name},
Customize the @code{scroll-conservatively} variable with @kbd{M-x
customize-variable @key{RET} scroll-conservatively @key{RET}} and set it
to a large value like, say, 10000. For an explanation of what this
means, @inforef{Auto Scrolling, Auto Scrolling, emacs}.
means, @pxref{Auto Scrolling,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}.
Alternatively, use the following Lisp form in your @file{.emacs}:
......@@ -2692,8 +2691,8 @@ put the following in your @file{.emacs} file:
To avoid the slightly distracting visual effect of Emacs starting with
its default frame size and then growing to fullscreen, you can add an
@samp{Emacs.Geometry} entry to the Windows registry settings (see
@pxref{(emacs)X Resources}).
@samp{Emacs.Geometry} entry to the Windows registry settings.
@xref{X Resources,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}.
To compute the correct values for width and height, first maximize the
Emacs frame and then evaluate @code{(frame-height)} and
......@@ -3058,7 +3057,7 @@ You can also tell Emacs whether to allow the evaluation of Emacs Lisp
code found at the bottom of files by setting the variable
@code{enable-local-eval}.
For more information, @inforef{File Variables, File Variables, emacs}.
@xref{File Variables,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}.
@item
Synthetic X events. (Yes, a risk; use @samp{MIT-MAGIC-COOKIE-1} or
......@@ -3501,7 +3500,7 @@ Keys can be bound to commands either interactively or in your
To bind a key just in the current major mode, type @kbd{M-x
local-set-key @key{RET} @var{key} @var{cmd} @key{RET}}.
@inforef{Key Bindings, Key Bindings, emacs}, for further details.
@xref{Key Bindings,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}.
To make the process of binding keys interactively easier, use the
following ``trick'': First bind the key interactively, then immediately
......@@ -3766,8 +3765,8 @@ keymaps.
However, in the specific case of @kbd{C-h} and @key{DEL}, you should
toggle @code{normal-erase-is-backspace-mode} instead of calling
@code{keyboard-translate}. @inforef{DEL Does Not Delete, DEL Does Not Delete,
emacs}.
@code{keyboard-translate}.
@xref{DEL Does Not Delete,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}.
Keyboard translations are not the same as key bindings in keymaps.
Emacs contains numerous keymaps that apply in different situations, but
......@@ -3895,7 +3894,7 @@ terminals. Non-@acronym{ASCII} keys and mouse events (e.g. @kbd{C-=} and
@cindex @key{Meta} key and @code{xterm}
@cindex Xterm and @key{Meta} key
@inforef{Unibyte Mode, Single-Byte Character Set Support, emacs}.
@xref{Unibyte Mode,, Single-Byte Character Set Support, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}.
If the advice in the Emacs manual fails, try all of these methods before
asking for further help:
......@@ -4019,8 +4018,8 @@ You can get the old behavior by binding @kbd{SPC} to
@cindex Displaying eight-bit characters
@cindex Eight-bit characters, displaying
@inforef{Unibyte Mode, Single-byte Character Set
Support, emacs}. On a Unix, when Emacs runs on a text-only terminal
@xref{Unibyte Mode,, Single-byte Character Set Support, emacs, The GNU
Emacs Manual}. On a Unix, when Emacs runs on a text-only terminal
display or is invoked with @samp{emacs -nw}, you typically need to use
@code{set-terminal-coding-system} to tell Emacs what the terminal can
display, even after setting the language environment; otherwise
......@@ -4035,10 +4034,10 @@ terminal coding system automatically.
@cindex Eight-bit characters, entering
@cindex Input, 8-bit characters
Various methods are available for input of eight-bit characters. See
@inforef{Unibyte Mode, Single-byte Character Set
Support, emacs}. For more sophisticated methods, @inforef{Input
Methods, Input Methods, emacs}.
Various methods are available for input of eight-bit characters.
@xref{Unibyte Mode,, Single-byte Character Set Support, emacs, The GNU
Emacs Manual}. For more sophisticated methods,
@pxref{Input Methods,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}.
@node Right-to-left alphabets
@section Where is an Emacs that can handle Semitic (right-to-left) alphabets?
......@@ -4377,7 +4376,7 @@ you to start Emacs quickly when you needed to.
Use @kbd{M-x gnus}. For more information on Gnus, @pxref{Top,, the Gnus
Manual, gnus, The Gnus Manual}, which includes @ref{Frequently Asked
Questions,, the Gnus FAQ, gnus}.
Questions,, the Gnus FAQ, gnus, The Gnus Manual}.
@node Gnus does not work with NNTP
......
Markdown is supported
0% or .
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment