Commit 31ff037a authored by Eli Zaretskii's avatar Eli Zaretskii

Restore some of the quoting in the manuals

* doc/lispref/windows.texi (Coordinates and Windows)
(Coordinates and Windows):
* doc/lispref/variables.texi (Lexical Binding)
(File Local Variables):
* doc/lispref/text.texi (Format Properties):
* doc/lispref/symbols.texi (Symbol Components):
* doc/lispref/strings.texi (Creating Strings):
* doc/lispref/sequences.texi (Sequence Functions):
* doc/lispref/searching.texi (Regexp Special, Regexp Search)
(Search and Replace):
* doc/lispref/processes.texi (Bindat Spec):
* doc/lispref/os.texi (Idle Timers):
* doc/lispref/objects.texi (Basic Char Syntax):
* doc/lispref/numbers.texi (Float Basics, Random Numbers):
* doc/lispref/nonascii.texi (Character Properties):
* doc/lispref/modes.texi (Major Mode Conventions, Mode Hooks)
(Mode Line Variables):
* doc/lispref/minibuf.texi (Text from Minibuffer):
* doc/lispref/loading.texi (Autoload):
* doc/lispref/keymaps.texi (Controlling Active Maps):
* doc/lispref/frames.texi (Frame Layout, Size and Position)
(Size Parameters, Implied Frame Resizing):
* doc/lispref/files.texi (Changing Files, Magic File Names):
* doc/lispref/eval.texi (Self-Evaluating Forms):
* doc/lispref/display.texi (Progress, Abstract Display)
(Abstract Display Example, Bidirectional Display):
* doc/lispref/commands.texi (Event Mod):
* doc/emacs/windows.texi (Displaying Buffers):
* doc/emacs/trouble.texi (Bug Criteria, Checklist):
* doc/emacs/text.texi (Enriched Text):
* doc/emacs/programs.texi (MixedCase Words):
* doc/emacs/picture-xtra.texi (Insert in Picture)
(Tabs in Picture):
* doc/emacs/misc.texi (Emacs Server, Printing):
* doc/emacs/mini.texi (Minibuffer History):
* doc/emacs/maintaining.texi (Old Revisions, VC Change Log)
(Pulling / Pushing):
* doc/emacs/killing.texi (Yanking, Cut and Paste, Clipboard):
* doc/emacs/help.texi (Help, Help Echo):
* doc/emacs/glossary.texi (Glossary):
* doc/emacs/frames.texi (Mouse Commands, Creating Frames)
(Frame Commands):
* doc/emacs/files.texi (Reverting, Saving, Directories):
* doc/emacs/entering.texi (Exiting):
* doc/emacs/emacs.texi (Top):
* doc/emacs/cmdargs.texi (Window Size X, Icons X):
* doc/emacs/anti.texi (Antinews): Restore quoting of text where
appropriate or replace quoting with @dfn.
* doc/misc/ediff.texi (Window and Frame Configuration):
* doc/lispref/processes.texi (Network Feature Testing):
* doc/lispref/display.texi (Display Margins): Quote the phrase
after "a.k.a." where appropriate.
parent bc67e467
......@@ -13,14 +13,14 @@ greater simplicity that results from the absence of many Emacs
@itemize @bullet
@item
Support for displaying and editing bidirectional text has been
Support for displaying and editing ``bidirectional'' text has been
removed. Text is now always displayed on the screen in a single
consistent direction---left to right---regardless of the underlying
script. Similarly, @kbd{C-f} and @kbd{C-b} always move the text
cursor to the right and left respectively. Also, @key{RIGHT} and
@key{LEFT} are now equivalent to @kbd{C-f} and @kbd{C-b}, as you might
expect, rather than moving forward or backward based on the underlying
paragraph direction.
``paragraph direction''.
Users of right-to-left languages, like Arabic and Hebrew, may
adapt by reading and/or editing text in left-to-right order.
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ the text in the region; it deletes a single character instead.
We have reworked how Emacs handles the clipboard and the X primary
selection. Commands for killing and yanking, like @kbd{C-w} and
@kbd{C-y}, use the primary selection and not the clipboard, so you can
use these commands without interfering with cutting or pasting
use these commands without interfering with ``cutting'' or ``pasting''
in other programs. The @samp{Cut}/@samp{Copy}/@samp{Paste} menu items
are bound to separate clipboard commands, not to the same commands as
@kbd{C-w}/@kbd{M-w}/@kbd{C-y}.
......
......@@ -1036,7 +1036,7 @@ tool bar when it processes the specified geometry.
When using one of @samp{--fullscreen}, @samp{--maximized},
@samp{--fullwidth} or @samp{--fullheight}, some window managers require
you to set the variable @code{frame-resize-pixelwise} to a non-@code{nil}
value to make a frame appear truly maximized or fullscreen.
value to make a frame appear truly maximized or full-screen.
Some window managers have options that can make them ignore both
program-specified and user-specified positions. If these are set,
......@@ -1125,12 +1125,12 @@ Start Emacs in an iconified state.
Disable the use of the Emacs icon.
@end table
Most window managers allow you to iconify (or minimize) an
Most window managers allow you to iconify (or ``minimize'') an
Emacs frame, hiding it from sight. Some window managers replace
iconified windows with tiny icons, while others remove them
entirely from sight. The @samp{-iconic} option tells Emacs to begin
running in an iconified state, rather than showing a frame right away.
The text frame doesn't appear until you deiconify (or un-minimize)
The text frame doesn't appear until you deiconify (or ``un-minimize'')
it.
By default, Emacs uses an icon containing the Emacs logo. On
......
......@@ -638,7 +638,7 @@ Enriched Text
* Enriched Indentation:: Changing the left and right margins.
* Enriched Justification:: Centering, setting text flush with the
left or right margin, etc.
* Enriched Properties:: The special text properties submenu.
* Enriched Properties:: The ``Special text properties'' submenu.
@c The automatic texinfo menu update inserts some duplicate items here
@c (faces, colors, indentation, justification, properties), because
......
......@@ -100,7 +100,7 @@ display them initially.
Kill Emacs (@code{save-buffers-kill-terminal}).
@item C-z
On a text terminal, suspend Emacs; on a graphical display,
iconify or minimize the selected frame (@code{suspend-emacs}).
iconify (or ``minimize'') the selected frame (@code{suspend-emacs}).
@end table
@kindex C-x C-c
......
......@@ -340,7 +340,7 @@ that was visited in the buffer.
* Customize Save:: Customizing the saving of files.
* Interlocking:: How Emacs protects against simultaneous editing
of one file by two users.
* Shadowing: File Shadowing. Copying files to shadows automatically.
* Shadowing: File Shadowing. Copying files to ``shadows'' automatically.
* Time Stamps:: Emacs can update time stamps on saved files.
@end menu
......@@ -941,7 +941,7 @@ buffers, type @kbd{M-x global-auto-revert-mode} to enable Global
Auto-Revert mode. These minor modes do not check or revert remote
files, because that is usually too slow.
One use of Auto-Revert mode is to tail a file such as a system
One use of Auto-Revert mode is to ``tail'' a file such as a system
log, so that changes made to that file by other programs are
continuously displayed. To do this, just move the point to the end of
the buffer, and it will stay there as the file contents change.
......@@ -1255,8 +1255,8 @@ this, it runs the program specified by
The command @kbd{M-x delete-directory} prompts for a directory name
using the minibuffer, and deletes the directory if it is empty. If
the directory is not empty, you will be asked whether you want to
delete it recursively. On systems that have a Trash (or Recycle
Bin) feature, you can make this command move the specified directory
delete it recursively. On systems that have a ``Trash'' (or ``Recycle
Bin'') feature, you can make this command move the specified directory
to the Trash instead of deleting it outright, by changing the variable
@code{delete-by-moving-to-trash} to @code{t}. @xref{Misc File Ops},
for more information about using the Trash.
......
......@@ -197,7 +197,7 @@ deactivating the mark. @xref{Shift Selection}.
@vindex mouse-wheel-follow-mouse
@vindex mouse-wheel-scroll-amount
@vindex mouse-wheel-progressive-speed
Some mice have a wheel which can be used for scrolling. Emacs
Some mice have a ``wheel'' which can be used for scrolling. Emacs
supports scrolling windows with the mouse wheel, by default, on most
graphical displays. To toggle this feature, use @kbd{M-x
mouse-wheel-mode}. The variables @code{mouse-wheel-follow-mouse} and
......@@ -388,9 +388,9 @@ boundary to the left or right.
The prefix key @kbd{C-x 5} is analogous to @kbd{C-x 4}. Whereas
each @kbd{C-x 4} command pops up a buffer in a different window in the
selected frame (@pxref{Pop Up Window}), the @kbd{C-x 5} commands use a
different frame. If an existing visible or iconified (minimized)
different frame. If an existing visible or iconified (a.k.a.@: ``minimized'')
frame already displays the requested buffer, that frame is raised and
deiconified (un-minimized); otherwise, a new frame is created on
deiconified (``un-minimized''); otherwise, a new frame is created on
the current display terminal.
The various @kbd{C-x 5} commands differ in how they find or create the
......@@ -467,8 +467,8 @@ maximized, it fills the screen.
@item <F11>
@kindex <F11>
@findex toggle-frame-fullscreen
Toggle fullscreen mode for the current frame. (The difference
between fullscreen and maximized is normally that the former
Toggle full-screen mode for the current frame. (The difference
between full-screen and maximized is normally that the former
hides window manager decorations, giving slightly more screen space to
Emacs itself.)
@end table
......@@ -476,7 +476,7 @@ Emacs itself.)
@vindex frame-resize-pixelwise
Note that with some window managers you may have to customize the
variable @code{frame-resize-pixelwise} to a non-@code{nil} value in
order to make a frame truly maximized or fullscreen. This
order to make a frame truly maximized or full-screen. This
variable, when set to a non-@code{nil} value, in general allows
resizing frames at pixel resolution, rather than in integral multiples
of lines and columns.
......
......@@ -100,7 +100,7 @@ A base buffer is a buffer whose text is shared by an indirect buffer
Some human languages, such as English, are written from left to right.
Others, such as Arabic, are written from right to left. Emacs
supports both of these forms, as well as any mixture of them---this
is bidirectional text. @xref{Bidirectional Editing}.
is ``bidirectional text''. @xref{Bidirectional Editing}.
@item Bind
To bind a key sequence means to give it a binding (q.v.).
......@@ -396,7 +396,7 @@ Variables}.
@item Dired
Dired is the Emacs facility that displays the contents of a file
directory and allows you to edit the directory, performing
directory and allows you to ``edit the directory'', performing
operations on the files in the directory. @xref{Dired}.
@item Disabled Command
......@@ -580,7 +580,7 @@ For more information, see @uref{http://fsf.org/, the FSF website}.
@item Fringe
On a graphical display (q.v.), there's a narrow portion of the frame
(q.v.@:) between the text area and the window's border. These
fringes are used to display symbols that provide information about
``fringes'' are used to display symbols that provide information about
the buffer text (@pxref{Fringes}). Emacs displays the fringe using a
special face (q.v.@:) called @code{fringe}. @xref{Faces,fringe}.
......
......@@ -72,7 +72,7 @@ inputs, but they all support @key{F1}.)
* Language Help:: Help relating to international language support.
* Misc Help:: Other help commands.
* Help Files:: Commands to display auxiliary help files.
* Help Echo:: Help on active text and tooltips.
* Help Echo:: Help on active text and tooltips (``balloon help'').
@end menu
@iftex
......@@ -634,7 +634,8 @@ Emacs (@code{describe-no-warranty}).
@cindex tooltips
@cindex balloon help
In Emacs, stretches of active text (text that does something
@cindex active text
In Emacs, stretches of @dfn{active text} (text that does something
special in response to mouse clicks or @key{RET}) often have
associated help text. This includes hyperlinks in Emacs buffers, as
well as parts of the mode line. On graphical displays, as well as
......
......@@ -306,7 +306,7 @@ e.g., @kbd{C-u 4 C-y} reinserts the fourth most recent kill.
On graphical displays, @kbd{C-y} first checks if another application
has placed any text in the system clipboard more recently than the
last Emacs kill. If so, it inserts the clipboard's text instead.
Thus, Emacs effectively treats cut or copy clipboard
Thus, Emacs effectively treats ``cut'' or ``copy'' clipboard
operations performed in other applications like Emacs kills, except
that they are not recorded in the kill ring. @xref{Cut and Paste},
for details.
......@@ -445,7 +445,7 @@ be yanked back in one place.
append to the text that @kbd{M-w} copied into the kill ring.
@node Cut and Paste
@section Cut and Paste Operations on Graphical Displays
@section ``Cut and Paste'' Operations on Graphical Displays
@cindex cut
@cindex copy
@cindex paste
......@@ -476,7 +476,7 @@ different data type by customizing @code{x-select-request-type}.
@cindex clipboard
The @dfn{clipboard} is the facility that most graphical applications
use for cutting and pasting. When the clipboard exists, the kill
use for ``cutting and pasting''. When the clipboard exists, the kill
and yank commands in Emacs make use of it.
When you kill some text with a command such as @kbd{C-w}
......@@ -493,7 +493,7 @@ losing the old clipboard data---at the risk of high memory consumption
if that data turns out to be large.
Yank commands, such as @kbd{C-y} (@code{yank}), also use the
clipboard. If another application owns the clipboard---i.e., if
clipboard. If another application ``owns'' the clipboard---i.e., if
you cut or copied text there more recently than your last kill command
in Emacs---then Emacs yanks from the clipboard instead of the kill
ring.
......@@ -512,7 +512,7 @@ change the variable @code{x-select-enable-clipboard} to @code{nil}.
@vindex x-select-enable-clipboard-manager
Many X desktop environments support a feature called the
@dfn{clipboard manager}. If you exit Emacs while it is the current
owner of the clipboard data, and there is a clipboard manager
``owner'' of the clipboard data, and there is a clipboard manager
running, Emacs transfers the clipboard data to the clipboard manager
so that it is not lost. In some circumstances, this may cause a delay
when exiting Emacs; if you wish to prevent Emacs from transferring
......
......@@ -824,7 +824,7 @@ window.
@kindex C-x v g
Many version control systems allow you to view files @dfn{annotated}
with per-line revision information, by typing @kbd{C-x v g}
(@code{vc-annotate}). This creates a new annotate buffer
(@code{vc-annotate}). This creates a new ``annotate'' buffer
displaying the file's text, with each line colored to show
how old it is. Red text is new, blue is old, and intermediate colors
indicate intermediate ages. By default, the color is scaled over the
......@@ -836,7 +836,7 @@ arguments using the minibuffer: the revision to display and annotate
(instead of the current file contents), and the time span in days the
color range should cover.
From the annotate buffer, these and other color scaling options are
From the ``annotate'' buffer, these and other color scaling options are
available from the @samp{VC-Annotate} menu. In this buffer, you can
also use the following keys to browse the annotations of past revisions,
view diffs, or view log entries:
......@@ -901,11 +901,11 @@ Display the change history for the current repository
(@code{vc-print-root-log}).
@item C-x v I
Display the changes that a pull operation will retrieve
Display the changes that a ``pull'' operation will retrieve
(@code{vc-log-incoming}).
@item C-x v O
Display the changes that will be sent by the next push operation
Display the changes that will be sent by the next ``push'' operation
(@code{vc-log-outgoing}).
@end table
......@@ -1355,13 +1355,13 @@ commit will be committed to that specific branch.
@table @kbd
@item C-x v +
On a decentralized version control system, update the current branch
by pulling in changes from another location.
by ``pulling in'' changes from another location.
On a centralized version control system, update the current VC
fileset.
@item C-x v P
On a decentralized version control system, push changes from the
On a decentralized version control system, ``push'' changes from the
current branch to another location. This concept does not exist
for centralized version control systems.
@end table
......
......@@ -620,7 +620,7 @@ fetching later entries into the minibuffer.
entries in the minibuffer history (e.g., if you haven't previously
typed @kbd{M-p}), Emacs tries fetching from a list of default
arguments: values that you are likely to enter. You can think of this
as moving through the future history.
as moving through the ``future history''.
If you edit the text inserted by the @kbd{M-p} or @kbd{M-n}
minibuffer history commands, this does not change its entry in the
......
......@@ -1515,7 +1515,7 @@ command history, or other kinds of information with any existing Emacs
process.
You can solve this problem by setting up Emacs as an @dfn{edit
server}, so that it listens for external edit requests and acts
server}, so that it ``listens'' for external edit requests and acts
accordingly. There are two ways to start an Emacs server:
@itemize
......@@ -1808,7 +1808,7 @@ as detailed below, or using the @samp{File} menu on the menu bar.
@findex htmlfontify-buffer
Aside from the commands described in this section, you can also
print hardcopies from Dired (@pxref{Operating on Files}) and the diary
(@pxref{Displaying the Diary}). You can also print an Emacs
(@pxref{Displaying the Diary}). You can also ``print'' an Emacs
buffer to HTML with the command @kbd{M-x htmlfontify-buffer}, which
converts the current buffer to a HTML file, replacing Emacs faces with
CSS-based markup. Furthermore, Org mode allows you to print Org
......
......@@ -164,18 +164,18 @@ Move up after insertion (@code{picture-movement-up}).
Move down after insertion (@code{picture-movement-down}).
@item C-c `
@itemx C-c @key{Home}
Move up and left (northwest) after insertion (@code{picture-movement-nw}).
Move up and left (``northwest'') after insertion (@code{picture-movement-nw}).
@item C-c '
@itemx C-c @key{prior}
Move up and right (northeast) after insertion
Move up and right (``northeast'') after insertion
(@code{picture-movement-ne}).
@item C-c /
@itemx C-c @key{End}
Move down and left (southwest) after insertion
Move down and left (``southwest'') after insertion
@*(@code{picture-movement-sw}).
@item C-c \
@itemx C-c @key{next}
Move down and right (southeast) after insertion
Move down and right (``southeast'') after insertion
@*(@code{picture-movement-se}).
@end table
......@@ -197,12 +197,12 @@ C-b} (@code{picture-motion-reverse}) moves in the opposite direction.
Two kinds of tab-like action are provided in Picture mode. Use
@kbd{M-@key{TAB}} (@code{picture-tab-search}) for context-based tabbing.
With no argument, it moves to a point underneath the next
interesting character that follows whitespace in the previous
``interesting'' character that follows whitespace in the previous
nonblank line. ``Next'' here means ``appearing at a horizontal position
greater than the one point starts out at''. With an argument, as in
@kbd{C-u M-@key{TAB}}, this command moves to the next such interesting
character in the current line. @kbd{M-@key{TAB}} does not change the
text; it only moves point. Interesting characters are defined by
text; it only moves point. ``Interesting'' characters are defined by
the variable @code{picture-tab-chars}, which should define a set of
characters. The syntax for this variable is like the syntax used inside
of @samp{[@dots{}]} in a regular expression---but without the @samp{[}
......
......@@ -1340,7 +1340,7 @@ based on the spell-checker's dictionary. @xref{Spelling}.
@section MixedCase Words
@cindex camel case
Some programming styles make use of mixed-case (or CamelCase)
Some programming styles make use of mixed-case (or ``CamelCase'')
symbols like @samp{unReadableSymbol}. (In the GNU project, we recommend
using underscores to separate words within an identifier, rather than
using case distinctions.) Emacs has various features to make it easier
......
......@@ -2071,7 +2071,7 @@ serves as an example of the features of Enriched mode.
* Enriched Indentation:: Changing the left and right margins.
* Enriched Justification:: Centering, setting text flush with the
left or right margin, etc.
* Enriched Properties:: The special text properties submenu.
* Enriched Properties:: The ``special text properties'' submenu.
@end menu
@node Enriched Mode
......
......@@ -538,10 +538,10 @@ not feel obliged to read this list before reporting a bug.
@cindex bug criteria
@cindex what constitutes an Emacs bug
If Emacs accesses an invalid memory location or exits with an
operating system error message that indicates a problem in the program
(as opposed to something like ``disk full''), then it is certainly a
bug.
If Emacs accesses an invalid memory location (a.k.a.@:
``segmentation fault'') or exits with an operating system error
message that indicates a problem in the program (as opposed to
something like ``disk full''), then it is certainly a bug.
If the Emacs display does not correspond properly to the contents of
the buffer, then it is a bug. But you should check that features like
......@@ -964,7 +964,7 @@ More detailed advice and other useful techniques for debugging Emacs
are available in the file @file{etc/DEBUG} in the Emacs distribution.
That file also includes instructions for investigating problems
whereby Emacs stops responding (many people assume that Emacs is
hung, whereas in fact it might be in an infinite loop).
``hung'', whereas in fact it might be in an infinite loop).
To find the file @file{etc/DEBUG} in your Emacs installation, use the
directory name stored in the variable @code{data-directory}.
......
......@@ -339,7 +339,7 @@ in response to a user command. There are several different ways in
which commands do this.
Many commands, like @kbd{C-x C-f} (@code{find-file}), display the
buffer by taking over the selected window, expecting that the
buffer by ``taking over'' the selected window, expecting that the
user's attention will be diverted to that buffer. These commands
usually work by calling @code{switch-to-buffer} internally
(@pxref{Select Buffer}).
......
......@@ -2621,7 +2621,7 @@ then continues to wait for a valid input character, or keyboard-quit.
from @code{read-event}.
@defvar extra-keyboard-modifiers
This variable lets Lisp programs press the modifier keys on the
This variable lets Lisp programs ``press'' the modifier keys on the
keyboard. The value is a character. Only the modifiers of the
character matter. Each time the user types a keyboard key, it is
altered as if those modifier keys were held down. For instance, if
......
......@@ -386,7 +386,7 @@ results of @code{point-min} and @code{point-max} correspondingly.
Alternatively, you can set @var{min-value} and @var{max-value} to
@code{nil}. In that case, the progress reporter does not report
process percentages; it instead displays a spinner that rotates a
process percentages; it instead displays a ``spinner'' that rotates a
notch each time you update the progress reporter.
If @var{min-value} and @var{max-value} are numbers, you can give the
......@@ -4644,7 +4644,7 @@ variables:
@defvar left-margin-width
This variable specifies the width of the left margin, in character
cell (a.k.a.@: column) units. It is buffer-local in all buffers.
cell (a.k.a.@: ``column'') units. It is buffer-local in all buffers.
A value of @code{nil} means no left marginal area.
@end defvar
......@@ -5883,8 +5883,8 @@ in the search, instead of starting at the next button.
The Ewoc package constructs buffer text that represents a structure
of Lisp objects, and updates the text to follow changes in that
structure. This is like the view component in the
model--view--controller design paradigm. Ewoc means ``Emacs's
structure. This is like the ``view'' component in the
``model--view--controller'' design paradigm. Ewoc means ``Emacs's
Widget for Object Collections''.
An @dfn{ewoc} is a structure that organizes information required to
......@@ -6164,7 +6164,7 @@ The buffer is in Color Components mode."
@cindex controller part, model/view/controller
This example can be extended to be a color selection widget (in
other words, the controller part of the model--view--controller
other words, the ``controller'' part of the ``model--view--controller''
design paradigm) by defining commands to modify @code{colorcomp-data}
and to finish the selection process, and a keymap to tie it all
together conveniently.
......@@ -6822,9 +6822,9 @@ positions do not increase monotonically with string or buffer
position. In performing this @dfn{bidirectional reordering}, Emacs
follows the Unicode Bidirectional Algorithm (a.k.a.@: @acronym{UBA}),
which is described in Annex #9 of the Unicode standard
(@url{http://www.unicode.org/reports/tr9/}). Emacs provides a Full
Bidirectionality class implementation of the @acronym{UBA},
consistent with the requirements of the Unicode Standard v7.0.
(@url{http://www.unicode.org/reports/tr9/}). Emacs provides a ``Full
Bidirectionality'' class implementation of the @acronym{UBA},
consistent with the requirements of the Unicode Standard v8.0.
@defvar bidi-display-reordering
If the value of this buffer-local variable is non-@code{nil} (the
......
......@@ -146,7 +146,7 @@ contents unchanged.
@result{} 123
@end group
@group
(eval '123) ; @r{Evaluated by hand---result is the same.}
(eval '123) ; @r{Evaluated "by hand"---result is the same.}
@result{} 123
@end group
@group
......
......@@ -1603,7 +1603,7 @@ file. This works only on some operating systems, and only if you have
the correct permissions to do so.
If the optional argument @var{preserve-permissions} is non-@code{nil},
this function copies the file modes (or permissions) of
this function copies the file modes (or ``permissions'') of
@var{oldname} to @var{newname}, as well as the Access Control List and
SELinux context (if any). @xref{Information about Files}.
......@@ -2753,7 +2753,7 @@ no prefix argument is given, and @code{nil} otherwise.
@end deffn
@node Magic File Names
@section Making Certain File Names Magic
@section Making Certain File Names ``Magic''
@cindex magic file names
You can implement special handling for certain file names. This is
......
......@@ -500,7 +500,7 @@ Position}).
@cindex external border
The @dfn{external border} is part of the decorations supplied by the
window manager. It's typically used for resizing the frame with the
mouse. The external border is normally not shown on fullboth and
mouse. The external border is normally not shown on ``fullboth'' and
maximized frames (@pxref{Size Parameters}) and doesn't exist for text
terminal frames.
......@@ -841,7 +841,7 @@ of its character size, however, may: be ignored, cause a rounding
(GTK+), or be accepted (Lucid, Motif, MS-Windows).
With some window managers you may have to set this to non-@code{nil} in
order to make a frame appear truly maximized or fullscreen.
order to make a frame appear truly maximized or full-screen.
@end defopt
@defun set-frame-size frame width height pixelwise
......@@ -914,7 +914,7 @@ resize the frame's outer size, hence this will alter the number of
displayed lines.
Occasionally, such @dfn{implied frame resizing} may be unwanted, for
example, when the frame is maximized or made fullscreen (where it's
example, when the frame is maximized or made full-screen (where it's
turned off by default). In other cases you can disable implied resizing
with the following option:
......@@ -1288,34 +1288,34 @@ or both. Its value can be @code{fullwidth}, @code{fullheight},
@code{fullboth}, or @code{maximized}. A @dfn{fullwidth} frame is as
wide as possible, a @dfn{fullheight} frame is as tall as possible, and
a @dfn{fullboth} frame is both as wide and as tall as possible. A
@dfn{maximized} frame is like a fullboth frame, except that it usually
@dfn{maximized} frame is like a ``fullboth'' frame, except that it usually
keeps its title bar and the buttons for resizing
and closing the frame. Also, maximized frames typically avoid hiding
any task bar or panels displayed on the desktop. A fullboth frame,
any task bar or panels displayed on the desktop. A ``fullboth'' frame,
on the other hand, usually omits the title bar and occupies the entire
available screen space.
Fullheight and fullwidth frames are more similar to maximized
Full-height and full-width frames are more similar to maximized
frames in this regard. However, these typically display an external
border which might be absent with maximized frames. Hence the heights
of maximized and fullheight frames and the widths of maximized and
fullwidth frames often differ by a few pixels.
of maximized and full-height frames and the widths of maximized and
full-width frames often differ by a few pixels.
With some window managers you may have to customize the variable
@code{frame-resize-pixelwise} (@pxref{Size and Position}) in order to
make a frame truly appear maximized or fullscreen. Moreover,
make a frame truly appear maximized or full-screen. Moreover,
some window managers might not support smooth transition between the
various fullscreen or maximization states. Customizing the variable
various full-screen or maximization states. Customizing the variable
@code{x-frame-normalize-before-maximize} can help to overcome that.
@vindex fullscreen-restore, a frame parameter
@item fullscreen-restore
This parameter specifies the desired fullscreen state of the frame
after invoking the @code{toggle-frame-fullscreen} command (@pxref{Frame
Commands,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}) in the fullboth state.
Commands,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}) in the ``fullboth'' state.
Normally this parameter is installed automatically by that command when
toggling the state to fullboth. If, however, you start Emacs in the
fullboth state, you have to specify the desired behavior in your initial
``fullboth'' state, you have to specify the desired behavior in your initial
file as, for example
@example
......
......@@ -929,7 +929,7 @@ sequences entered using the menu bar, even if they do not affect the
menu bar display. So if a menu bar key sequence comes in, you should
clear the variables before looking up and executing that key sequence.
Modes that use the variables would typically do this anyway; normally
they respond to events that they do not handle by unreading them and
they respond to events that they do not handle by ``unreading'' them and
exiting.
@end defvar
......
......@@ -456,7 +456,7 @@ Autoloading can also be triggered by looking up the documentation of
the function or macro (@pxref{Documentation Basics}).
There are two ways to set up an autoloaded function: by calling
@code{autoload}, and by writing a magic comment in the
@code{autoload}, and by writing a ``magic'' comment in the
source before the real definition. @code{autoload} is the low-level
primitive for autoloading; any Lisp program can call @code{autoload} at
any time. Magic comments are the most convenient way to make a function
......
......@@ -143,7 +143,7 @@ reads the text and returns the resulting Lisp object, unevaluated.
The argument @var{default} specifies default values to make available
through the history commands. It should be a string, a list of
strings, or @code{nil}. The string or strings become the minibuffer's
future history, available to the user with @kbd{M-n}.
``future history'', available to the user with @kbd{M-n}.
If @var{read} is non-@code{nil}, then @var{default} is also used
as the input to @code{read}, if the user enters empty input.
......@@ -194,8 +194,8 @@ in @code{read-from-minibuffer} it should be a string, a list of
strings, or @code{nil}, which is equivalent to an empty string. When
@var{default} is a string, that string is the default value. When it
is a list of strings, the first string is the default value. (All
these strings are available to the user in the future minibuffer
history.)
these strings are available to the user in the ``future minibuffer
history''.)
This function works by calling the
@code{read-from-minibuffer} function:
......@@ -262,8 +262,8 @@ The last string or pattern used in query-replace commands.
The function now has a list of regular expressions that it passes to
@code{read-from-minibuffer} to obtain the user's input. The first
element of the list is the default result in case of empty input. All
elements of the list are available to the user as the future
minibuffer history list (@pxref{Minibuffer History, future list,,
elements of the list are available to the user as the ``future
minibuffer history'' list (@pxref{Minibuffer History, future list,,
emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}).
The optional argument @var{history}, if non-@code{nil}, is a symbol
......
......@@ -305,7 +305,7 @@ which documentation to print.
@item
The major mode command should set the variable @code{mode-name} to the
pretty name of the mode, usually a string (but see @ref{Mode Line
``pretty'' name of the mode, usually a string (but see @ref{Mode Line
Data}, for other possible forms). The name of the mode appears
in the mode line.
......@@ -901,7 +901,7 @@ such a major mode, please correct it to follow these conventions.
When you defined a major mode using @code{define-derived-mode}, it
automatically makes sure these conventions are followed. If you
define a major mode by hand, not using @code{define-derived-mode},
define a major mode ``by hand'', not using @code{define-derived-mode},
use the following functions to handle these conventions automatically.
@defun run-mode-hooks &rest hookvars
......@@ -1974,7 +1974,7 @@ This variable is used to identify @code{emacsclient} frames.
The following three variables are used in @code{mode-line-modes}:
@defvar mode-name
This buffer-local variable holds the pretty name of the current
This buffer-local variable holds the ``pretty'' name of the current
buffer's major mode. Each major mode should set this variable so that
the mode name will appear in the mode line. The value does not have
to be a string, but can use any of the data types valid in a mode-line
......
......@@ -483,7 +483,7 @@ Corresponds to the Unicode @code{Numeric_Value} property for
characters whose @code{Numeric_Type} is @samp{Decimal}. The value is
an integer, or @code{nil} if the character has no decimal digit value.
For unassigned codepoints, the value is @code{nil}, which means
@acronym{NaN}, or not a number.
@acronym{NaN}, or ``not a number''.
@item digit-value
Corresponds to the Unicode @code{Numeric_Value} property for
......
......@@ -224,7 +224,7 @@ distinguish them.
@cindex NaN
The @acronym{IEEE} floating-point standard supports positive
infinity and negative infinity as floating-point values. It also
provides for a class of values called NaN or not a number;
provides for a class of values called NaN, or ``not a number'';
numerical functions return such values in cases where there is no
correct answer. For example, @code{(/ 0.0 0.0)} returns a NaN@.
Although NaN values carry a sign, for practical purposes there is no other
......@@ -1217,7 +1217,8 @@ fashion. The numbers are not truly random, but they have certain
properties that mimic a random series. For example, all possible
values occur equally often in a pseudo-random series.
Pseudo-random numbers are generated from a seed. Starting from
@cindex seed, for random number generation
Pseudo-random numbers are generated from a @dfn{seed value}. Starting from
any given seed, the @code{random} function always generates the same
sequence of numbers. By default, Emacs initializes the random seed at
startup, in such a way that the sequence of values of @code{random}
......
......@@ -310,7 +310,7 @@ vertical tab, formfeed, space, return, del, and escape as @samp{?\a},
@samp{?\b}, @samp{?\t}, @samp{?\n}, @samp{?\v}, @samp{?\f},
@samp{?\s}, @samp{?\r}, @samp{?\d}, and @samp{?\e}, respectively.
(@samp{?\s} followed by a dash has a different meaning---it applies
the super modifier to the following character.) Thus,