Commit 332b5b9a authored by Chong Yidong's avatar Chong Yidong
Browse files

(Intro): Increase conciseness slightly. Remove paragraph saying that

Emacs provides menus and mouse support (which is par for the course).
parent 7e53d36c
......@@ -1133,22 +1133,23 @@ Contributors to GNU Emacs include Jari Aalto, Per Abrahamsen, Tomas
Abrahamsson, Jay K.@: Adams, Michael Albinus, Nagy Andras, Ralf
Angeli, Joe Arceneaux, Miles Bader, David Bakhash, Juanma Barranquero,
Eli Barzilay, Steven L.@: Baur, Jay Belanger, Alexander L.@: Belikoff,
Boaz Ben-Zvi, Karl Berry, Anna M.@: Bigatti, Ray Blaak, Jim Blandy, Johan Bockg@aa{}rd,
Per Bothner, Terrence Brannon, Frank Bresz, Peter Breton, Emmanuel
Briot, Kevin Broadey, Vincent Broman, David M.@: Brown, Georges
Brun-Cottan, Joe Buehler, W@l{}odek Bzyl, Bill Carpenter, Per
Cederqvist, Hans Chalupsky, Chris Chase, Bob Chassell, Andrew Choi,
Sacha Chua, James Clark, Mike Clarkson, Glynn Clements, Andrew
Csillag, Doug Cutting, Mathias Dahl, Satyaki Das, Michael DeCorte,
Gary Delp, Matthieu Devin, Eri Ding, Jan Dj@"{a}rv, Carsten Dominik,
Scott Draves, Benjamin Drieu, Viktor Dukhovni, John Eaton, Rolf Ebert,
Paul Eggert, Stephen Eglen, Torbj@"orn Einarsson, Tsugutomo Enami,
Hans Henrik Eriksen, Michael Ernst, Ata Etemadi, Frederick Farnbach,
Oscar Figueiredo, Fred Fish, Karl Fogel, Gary Foster, Romain
Francoise, Noah Friedman, Andreas Fuchs, Hallvard Furuseth, Keith
Gabryelski, Peter S.@: Galbraith, Kevin Gallagher, Kevin Gallo, Juan
Le@'{o}n Lahoz Garc@'{@dotless{i}}a, Howard Gayle, Stephen Gildea, Julien
Gilles, David Gillespie, Bob Glickstein, Deepak Goel, Boris Goldowsky,
Boaz Ben-Zvi, Karl Berry, Anna M.@: Bigatti, Ray Blaak, Jim Blandy,
Johan Bockg@aa{}rd, Per Bothner, Terrence Brannon, Frank Bresz, Peter
Breton, Emmanuel Briot, Kevin Broadey, Vincent Broman, David M.@:
Brown, Georges Brun-Cottan, Joe Buehler, W@l{}odek Bzyl, Bill
Carpenter, Per Cederqvist, Hans Chalupsky, Chong Yidong, Chris Chase,
Bob Chassell, Andrew Choi, Sacha Chua, James Clark, Mike Clarkson,
Glynn Clements, Andrew Csillag, Doug Cutting, Mathias Dahl, Satyaki
Das, Michael DeCorte, Gary Delp, Matthieu Devin, Eri Ding, Jan
Dj@"{a}rv, Carsten Dominik, Scott Draves, Benjamin Drieu, Viktor
Dukhovni, John Eaton, Rolf Ebert, Paul Eggert, Stephen Eglen,
Torbj@"orn Einarsson, Tsugutomo Enami, Hans Henrik Eriksen, Michael
Ernst, Ata Etemadi, Frederick Farnbach, Oscar Figueiredo, Fred Fish,
Karl Fogel, Gary Foster, Romain Francoise, Noah Friedman, Andreas
Fuchs, Hallvard Furuseth, Keith Gabryelski, Peter S.@: Galbraith,
Kevin Gallagher, Kevin Gallo, Juan Le@'{o}n Lahoz
Garc@'{@dotless{i}}a, Howard Gayle, Stephen Gildea, Julien Gilles,
David Gillespie, Bob Glickstein, Deepak Goel, Boris Goldowsky,
Michelangelo Grigni, Odd Gripenstam, Kai Gro@ss{}johann, Michael
Gschwind, Henry Guillaume, Doug Gwyn, Ken'ichi Handa, Lars Hansen,
Chris Hanson, K. Shane Hartman, John Heidemann, Jon K.@: Hellan,
......@@ -1202,10 +1203,10 @@ Paul Wallington, Colin Walters, Barry Warsaw, Morten Welinder, Joseph
Brian Wells, Rodney Whitby, John Wiegley, Ed Wilkinson, Mike Williams,
Bill Wohler, Steven A. Wood, Dale R.@: Worley, Francis J.@: Wright,
Felix S. T. Wu, Tom Wurgler, Katsumi Yamaoka, Masatake Yamato,
Jonathan Yavner, Ryan Yeske, Chong Yidong, Ilya Zakharevich, Milan
Zamazal, Victor Zandy, Eli Zaretskii, Jamie Zawinski, Shenghuo Zhu,
Ian T.@: Zimmermann, Reto Zimmermann, Neal Ziring, Teodor Zlatanov,
and Detlev Zundel.
Jonathan Yavner, Ryan Yeske, Ilya Zakharevich, Milan Zamazal, Victor
Zandy, Eli Zaretskii, Jamie Zawinski, Shenghuo Zhu, Ian T.@:
Zimmermann, Reto Zimmermann, Neal Ziring, Teodor Zlatanov, and Detlev
Zundel.
@end iftex
@node Intro, Glossary, Distrib, Top
......@@ -1215,48 +1216,39 @@ and Detlev Zundel.
advanced, self-documenting, customizable, extensible editor Emacs.
(The `G' in `GNU' is not silent.)
We call Emacs advanced because it provides much more than simple
insertion and deletion. It can control subprocesses, indent programs
automatically, show two or more files at once, and edit formatted
text. Emacs editing commands operate in terms of characters, words,
lines, sentences, paragraphs, and pages, as well as expressions and
comments in various programming languages.
@dfn{Self-documenting} means that at any time you can type a special
character, @kbd{Control-h}, to find out what your options are. You can
also use it to find out what any command does, or to find all the commands
that pertain to a topic. @xref{Help}.
@dfn{Customizable} means that you can alter Emacs commands' behavior
in simple ways. For example, if you use a programming language in
which comments start with @samp{<**} and end with @samp{**>}, you can
tell the Emacs comment manipulation commands to use those strings
(@pxref{Comments}). Another sort of customization is rearrangement of
the command set. For example, you can rebind the basic cursor motion
commands (up, down, left and right) to any keys on the keyboard that
you find comfortable. @xref{Customization}.
We call Emacs @dfn{advanced} because it can do much more than simple
insertion and deletion of text. It can control subprocesses, indent
programs automatically, show two or more files at once, and more.
Emacs editing commands operate in terms of characters, words, lines,
sentences, paragraphs, and pages, as well as expressions and comments
in various programming languages.
@dfn{Self-documenting} means that at any time you can use special
commands, known as @dfn{help commands}, to find out what your options
are, or to find out what what any command does, or to find all the
commands that pertain to a given topic. @xref{Help}.
@dfn{Customizable} means that you can easily alter the behavior of
Emacs commands in simple ways. For instance, if you use a programming
language in which comments start with @samp{<**} and end with
@samp{**>}, you can tell the Emacs comment manipulation commands to
use those strings (@pxref{Comments}). To take another example, you
can rebind the basic cursor motion commands (up, down, left and right)
to any keys on the keyboard that you find comfortable.
@xref{Customization}.
@dfn{Extensible} means that you can go beyond simple customization
and write entirely new commands---programs in the Lisp language to be
run by Emacs's own Lisp interpreter. Emacs is an ``on-line
extensible'' system, which means that it is divided into many
functions that call each other, any of which can be redefined in the
middle of an editing session. Almost any part of Emacs can be
replaced without making a separate copy of all of Emacs. Most of the
editing commands of Emacs are written in Lisp; the few exceptions
and create entirely new commands. New commands are simply programs
written in the Lisp language, which are run by Emacs's own Lisp
interpreter. Existing commands can even be redefined in the middle of
an editing session, without having to restart Emacs. Most of the
editing commands in Emacs are written in Lisp; the few exceptions
could have been written in Lisp but use C instead for efficiency.
Writing an extension is programming, but non-programmers can use it
afterwards. @xref{Top, Emacs Lisp Intro, Preface, eintr, An
Introduction to Programming in Emacs Lisp}, if you want to learn Emacs
Lisp programming.
When running on a graphical display, Emacs provides its own menus
and convenient handling of mouse buttons. In addition, Emacs provides
many of the benefits of a graphical display even on a text-only
terminal. For instance, it can highlight parts of a file, display and
edit several files at once, move text between files, and edit files
while running shell commands.
@include screen.texi
@include commands.texi
@include entering.texi
......
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