Commit 342fd6cd authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman

Fix formatting ugliness.

parent 9a262535
......@@ -426,7 +426,7 @@ to what @code{eval-when-compile} does.
@section Compiler Errors
@cindex compiler errors
Byte compilation writes errors and warnings into the buffer
Byte compilation outputs all errors and warnings into the buffer
@samp{*Compile-Log*}. The messages include file names and line
numbers that identify the location of the problem. The usual Emacs
commands for operating on compiler diagnostics work properly on
......
......@@ -658,7 +658,8 @@ means you should always list the most specific types first, and the
most general last. Here's an example of proper usage:
@example
(choice (const :tag "Off" nil) symbol (sexp :tag "Other"))
(choice (const :tag "Off" nil)
symbol (sexp :tag "Other"))
@end example
@noindent
......
......@@ -471,15 +471,15 @@ entered--entering a function:} as a line of text at the top of the
buffer.
@item debug
@code{debug} as first argument indicates a call to @code{debug}
because of entry to a function that was set to debug on entry. The
debugger displays @samp{Debugger entered--entering a function:}, just
as in the @code{lambda} case. It also marks the stack frame for that
function so that it will invoke the debugger when exited.
@code{debug} as first argument means @code{debug} was called because
of entry to a function that was set to debug on entry. The debugger
displays the string @samp{Debugger entered--entering a function:},
just as in the @code{lambda} case. It also marks the stack frame for
that function so that it will invoke the debugger when exited.
@item t
When the first argument is @code{t}, this indicates a call to
@code{debug} due to evaluation of a list form when
@code{debug} due to evaluation of a function call form when
@code{debug-on-next-call} is non-@code{nil}. The debugger displays
@samp{Debugger entered--beginning evaluation of function call form:}
as the top line in the buffer.
......
......@@ -547,15 +547,15 @@ remaining time and clearly see that Emacs is busy working, not hung.
reporting operation progress. Here is a working example that does
nothing useful:
@example
@smallexample
(let ((progress-reporter
(make-progress-reporter "Collecting some mana for Emacs..."
(make-progress-reporter "Collecting mana for Emacs..."
0 500)))
(dotimes (k 500)
(sit-for 0.01)
(progress-reporter-update progress-reporter k))
(progress-reporter-done progress-reporter))
@end example
@end smallexample
@defun make-progress-reporter message min-value max-value &optional current-value min-change min-time
This function creates and returns a @dfn{progress reporter}---an
......@@ -1296,8 +1296,8 @@ A cons cell of the form @code{(foreground-color . @var{color-name})} or
@code{(background-color . @var{color-name})}. These elements specify
just the foreground color or just the background color.
@code{(foreground-color . @var{color-name})} is equivalent to
@code{(:foreground @var{color-name})}, and likewise for the background.
@code{(foreground-color . @var{color-name})} has the same effect as
@code{(:foreground @var{color-name})}; likewise for the background.
@end itemize
@item mouse-face
......@@ -2757,10 +2757,9 @@ For instance, this changes the default fontset to use a font of which
registry name is @samp{JISX0208.1983} for all characters belonging to
the charset @code{japanese-jisx0208}.
@example
@smallexample
(set-fontset-font nil 'japanese-jisx0208 '(nil . "JISX0208.1983"))
@end example
@end smallexample
@end defun
@defun char-displayable-p char
......@@ -3137,7 +3136,7 @@ single unit. By contrast, characters that have similar but distinct
Lisp objects as their @code{display} properties are handled
separately. Here's a function that illustrates this point:
@example
@smallexample
(defun foo ()
(goto-char (point-min))
(dotimes (i 5)
......@@ -3146,7 +3145,7 @@ separately. Here's a function that illustrates this point:
(forward-char 1)
(put-text-property (point) (1+ (point)) 'display string)
(forward-char 1))))
@end example
@end smallexample
@noindent
It gives each of the first ten characters in the buffer string
......@@ -3158,7 +3157,7 @@ Likewise for each following pair of characters. Thus, the ten
characters appear as five A's. This function would have the same
results:
@example
@smallexample
(defun foo ()
(goto-char (point-min))
(dotimes (i 5)
......@@ -3166,7 +3165,7 @@ results:
(put-text-property (point) (2+ (point)) 'display string)
(put-text-property (point) (1+ (point)) 'display string)
(forward-char 2))))
@end example
@end smallexample
@noindent
This illustrates that what matters is the property value for
......@@ -3262,18 +3261,20 @@ as an absolute number of pixels.
The following expressions are supported:
@example
@smallexample
@group
@var{expr} ::= @var{num} | (@var{num}) | @var{unit} | @var{elem} | @var{pos} | @var{image} | @var{form}
@var{num} ::= @var{integer} | @var{float} | @var{symbol}
@var{unit} ::= in | mm | cm | width | height
@end group
@group
@var{elem} ::= left-fringe | right-fringe | left-margin | right-margin
| scroll-bar | text
@var{pos} ::= left | center | right
@var{form} ::= (@var{num} . @var{expr}) | (@var{op} @var{expr} ...)
@var{op} ::= + | -
@end group
@end example
@end smallexample
The form @var{num} specifies a fraction of the default frame font
height or width. The form @code{(@var{num})} specifies an absolute
......@@ -3331,7 +3332,7 @@ in the @code{display} text property.
Display @var{string} instead of the text that has this property.
@item (image . @var{image-props})
This display specification is an image descriptor (@pxref{Images}).
This kind of display specification is an image descriptor (@pxref{Images}).
When used as a display specification, it means to display the image
instead of the text that has the display specification.
......
......@@ -330,7 +330,7 @@ program to stop.
Proceed to the stop point near where point is (@code{edebug-goto-here}).
@item f
Run the program forward over one expression
Run the program for one expression
(@code{edebug-forward-sexp}).
@item o
......@@ -462,9 +462,9 @@ point (@code{edebug-unset-breakpoint}).
@item x @var{condition} @key{RET}
Set a conditional breakpoint which stops the program only if
@var{condition} evaluates to a non-@code{nil} value
(@code{edebug-set-conditional-breakpoint}). With a prefix argument, the
breakpoint is temporary.
evaluating @var{condition} produces a non-@code{nil} value
(@code{edebug-set-conditional-breakpoint}). With a prefix argument,
the breakpoint is temporary.
@item B
Move point to the next breakpoint in the current definition
......@@ -585,8 +585,8 @@ effect outside of Edebug.
@table @kbd
@item v
View the outside window configuration (@code{edebug-view-outside}).
Type @kbd{C-x X w} to return to Edebug.
Switch to viewing the outside window configuration
(@code{edebug-view-outside}). Type @kbd{C-x X w} to return to Edebug.
@item p
Temporarily display the outside current buffer with point at its
......@@ -1035,11 +1035,12 @@ saves (and later restores) these additional data:
The current match data. @xref{Match Data}.
@item
@code{last-command}, @code{this-command}, @code{last-command-char},
@code{last-input-char}, @code{last-input-event},
@code{last-command-event}, @code{last-event-frame},
@code{last-nonmenu-event}, and @code{track-mouse}. Commands used within
Edebug do not affect these variables outside of Edebug.
The variables @code{last-command}, @code{this-command},
@code{last-command-char}, @code{last-input-char},
@code{last-input-event}, @code{last-command-event},
@code{last-event-frame}, @code{last-nonmenu-event}, and
@code{track-mouse}. Commands used within Edebug do not affect these
variables outside of Edebug.
The key sequence returned by @code{this-command-keys} is changed by
executing commands within Edebug and there is no way to reset
......@@ -1099,13 +1100,13 @@ macro. To do this, add a @code{debug} declaration to the macro
definition. Here is a simple example that shows the specification for
the @code{for} example macro (@pxref{Argument Evaluation}).
@example
@smallexample
(defmacro for (var from init to final do &rest body)
"Execute a simple \"for\" loop.
For example, (for i from 1 to 10 do (print i))."
(declare (debug (symbolp "from" form "to" form "do" &rest form)))
...)
@end example
@end smallexample
The Edebug specification says which parts of a call to the macro are
forms to be evaluated. For simple macros, the @var{specification}
......
......@@ -63,7 +63,7 @@ See @code{/} and @code{%} in @ref{Numbers}.
@xref{Function Indirection}.
@item cyclic-variable-indirection
@code{"Symbol's chain of variable indirections contains a loop"}@*
@code{"Symbol's chain of variable indirections\@* contains a loop"}@*
@xref{Variable Aliases}.
@item end-of-buffer
......
......@@ -98,9 +98,9 @@ new buffer and reading the file into it. It also returns that buffer.
Aside from some technical details, the body of the @code{find-file}
function is basically equivalent to:
@example
@smallexample
(switch-to-buffer (find-file-noselect filename nil nil wildcards))
@end example
@end smallexample
@noindent
(See @code{switch-to-buffer} in @ref{Displaying Buffers}.)
......@@ -2731,9 +2731,9 @@ This function tests whether @var{filename} is a remote file. If
If @var{filename} is indeed remote, the return value is a string that
identifies the remote system.
This identifier string may include a host name, a user name, and
characters designating the method used to access the remote system.
For example, the remote identifier string for the filename
This identifier string can include a host name and a user name, as
well as characters designating the method used to access the remote
system. For example, the remote identifier string for the filename
@code{/ssh:user@@host:/some/file} is @code{/ssh:user@@host:}.
If @code{file-remote-p} returns the same identifier for two different
......
......@@ -1550,13 +1550,13 @@ clients. It takes two optional arguments, @var{type} and
The @var{data-type} argument specifies the form of data conversion to
use, to convert the raw data obtained from another X client into Lisp
data. Meaningful values include @code{TEXT}, @code{STRING},
@code{UTF8_STRING},
@code{TARGETS}, @code{LENGTH}, @code{DELETE}, @code{FILE_NAME},
@code{CHARACTER_POSITION}, @code{LINE_NUMBER}, @code{COLUMN_NUMBER},
@code{OWNER_OS}, @code{HOST_NAME}, @code{USER}, @code{CLASS},
@code{NAME}, @code{ATOM}, and @code{INTEGER}. (These are symbols with
upper-case names in accord with X conventions.) The default for
@var{data-type} is @code{STRING}.
@code{UTF8_STRING}, @code{TARGETS}, @code{LENGTH}, @code{DELETE},
@code{FILE_NAME}, @code{CHARACTER_POSITION}, @code{NAME},
@code{LINE_NUMBER}, @code{COLUMN_NUMBER}, @code{OWNER_OS},
@code{HOST_NAME}, @code{USER}, @code{CLASS}, @code{ATOM}, and
@code{INTEGER}. (These are symbols with upper-case names in accord
with X conventions.) The default for @var{data-type} is
@code{STRING}.
@end defun
@cindex cut buffer
......@@ -1822,8 +1822,8 @@ xterm.vt100.background: yellow
@end example
@noindent
in in your X resources file (usually named @file{~/.Xdefaults} or
@file{~/.Xresources}). Then:
in in your X resources file (whose name is usually @file{~/.Xdefaults}
or @file{~/.Xresources}). Then:
@example
@group
......
......@@ -525,9 +525,9 @@ defines the symbol @var{name} as a function that looks like this:
@var{name}. It returns the value @var{name}, but usually we ignore this
value.
As described previously (@pxref{Lambda Expressions}),
@var{argument-list} is a list of argument names and may include the
keywords @code{&optional} and @code{&rest}. Also, the first two of the
As described previously, @var{argument-list} is a list of argument
names and may include the keywords @code{&optional} and @code{&rest}
(@pxref{Lambda Expressions}). Also, the first two of the
@var{body-forms} may be a documentation string and an interactive
declaration.
......@@ -1174,20 +1174,13 @@ You can define a function as an alias and declare it obsolete at the
same time using the macro @code{define-obsolete-function-alias}.
@defmac define-obsolete-function-alias obsolete-name current-name &optional when docstring
This macro marks the function @var{obsolete-name} obsolete and also defines
it as an alias for the function @var{current-name}. A typical call has the
form:
This macro marks the function @var{obsolete-name} obsolete and also
defines it as an alias for the function @var{current-name}. It is
equivalent to the following:
@example
(define-obsolete-function-alias 'old-fun 'new-fun "22.1" "Doc.")
@end example
@noindent
which is equivalent to the following two lines of code:
@example
(defalias 'old-fun 'new-fun "Doc.")
(make-obsolete 'old-fun 'new-fun "22.1")
(defalias @var{obsolete-name} @var{current-name} @var{docstring})
(make-obsolete @var{obsolete-name} @var{current-name} @var{when})
@end example
@end defmac
......
......@@ -119,7 +119,7 @@ retrieves the text from a file if the value calls for that. If the
property value isn't @code{nil}, isn't a string, and doesn't refer to
text in a file, then it is evaluated to obtain a string.
Finally, @code{documentation-property} passes the string through
The last thing this function does is pass the string through
@code{substitute-command-keys} to substitute actual key bindings,
unless @var{verbatim} is non-@code{nil}.
......
......@@ -1335,10 +1335,10 @@ a key binding.
instead of @code{kill-line} and @code{kill-word}. It can establish
this by making these two command-remapping bindings in its keymap:
@example
@smallexample
(define-key my-mode-map [remap kill-line] 'my-kill-line)
(define-key my-mode-map [remap kill-word] 'my-kill-word)
@end example
@end smallexample
Whenever @code{my-mode-map} is an active keymap, if the user types
@kbd{C-k}, Emacs will find the standard global binding of
......@@ -1349,10 +1349,10 @@ so instead of running @code{kill-line}, Emacs runs
Remapping only works through a single level. In other words,
@example
@smallexample
(define-key my-mode-map [remap kill-line] 'my-kill-line)
(define-key my-mode-map [remap my-kill-line] 'my-other-kill-line)
@end example
@end smallexample
@noindent
does not have the effect of remapping @code{kill-line} into
......
......@@ -395,7 +395,7 @@ setting up a buffer-local value for the variable
@item
The mode should specify how Imenu should find the definitions or
sections of a buffer, by setting up a buffer-local value for the
variable @code{imenu-generic-expression}, for the pair of variables
variable @code{imenu-generic-expression}, for the two variables
@code{imenu-prev-index-position-function} and
@code{imenu-extract-index-name-function}, or for the variable
@code{imenu-create-index-function} (@pxref{Imenu}).
......@@ -2290,8 +2290,8 @@ A nested sub-alist element looks like this:
It creates the submenu @var{menu-title} specified by @var{sub-alist}.
The default value of @code{imenu-create-index-function} is
@code{imenu-default-create-index-function}. This function uses
@code{imenu-prev-index-position-function} and
@code{imenu-default-create-index-function}. This function calls the
value of @code{imenu-prev-index-position-function} and the value of
@code{imenu-extract-index-name-function} to produce the index alist.
However, if either of these two variables is @code{nil}, the default
function uses @code{imenu-generic-expression} instead.
......@@ -2456,7 +2456,7 @@ highlighted (instead of the entire text that @var{matcher} matched).
@end example
If you use @code{regexp-opt} to produce the regular expression
@var{matcher}, then you can use @code{regexp-opt-depth} (@pxref{Regexp
@var{matcher}, you can use @code{regexp-opt-depth} (@pxref{Regexp
Functions}) to calculate the value for @var{subexp}.
@item (@var{matcher} . @var{facespec})
......@@ -2657,8 +2657,7 @@ non-@code{nil} value, they are added at the end of
Some modes provide specialized support you can use in additional
highlighting patterns. See the variables
@code{c-font-lock-extra-types}, @code{c++-font-lock-extra-types},
@code{objc-font-lock-extra-types} and
@code{java-font-lock-extra-types}, for example.
and @code{java-font-lock-extra-types}, for example.
@strong{Warning:} major mode functions must not call
@code{font-lock-add-keywords} under any circumstances, either directly
......
......@@ -1067,11 +1067,11 @@ for decoding (in case @var{operation} does decoding), and
@var{encoding-system} is the coding system for encoding (in case
@var{operation} does encoding).
The argument @var{operation} should be a symbol, one of
@code{insert-file-contents}, @code{write-region}, @code{call-process},
@code{call-process-region}, @code{start-process}, or
@code{open-network-stream}. These are the names of the Emacs I/O primitives
that can do coding system conversion.
The argument @var{operation} should be a symbol, any one of
@code{insert-file-contents}, @code{write-region},
@code{start-process}, @code{call-process}, @code{call-process-region},
or @code{open-network-stream}. These are the names of the Emacs I/O
primitives that can do coding system conversion.
The remaining arguments should be the same arguments that might be given
to that I/O primitive. Depending on the primitive, one of those
......@@ -1081,9 +1081,9 @@ name is the target. For subprocess primitives, the process name is the
target. For @code{open-network-stream}, the target is the service name
or port number.
This function looks up the target in @code{file-coding-system-alist},
@code{process-coding-system-alist}, or
@code{network-coding-system-alist}, depending on @var{operation}.
Depending on @var{operation}, this function looks up the target in
@code{file-coding-system-alist}, @code{process-coding-system-alist},
or @code{network-coding-system-alist}.
@end defun
@node Specifying Coding Systems
......
......@@ -91,10 +91,10 @@ name is usually @file{site-start.el}.
@cindex @file{site-start.el}
@item
It loads your init file (usually @file{~/.emacs}), unless @samp{-q}
(or @samp{--no-init-file}), @samp{-Q}, or @samp{--batch} was specified
on the command line. The @samp{-u} option can specify another user
whose home directory should be used instead of @file{~}.
It loads your init file (usually @file{~/.emacs}), unless the option
@samp{-q} (or @samp{--no-init-file}), @samp{-Q}, or @samp{--batch} was
specified on the command line. The @samp{-u} option can specify
another user whose home directory should be used instead of @file{~}.
@item
It loads the library @file{default} (if any), unless
......@@ -606,9 +606,10 @@ through various functions. These variables include the name of the
system, the user's @acronym{UID}, and so on.
@defvar system-configuration
This variable holds the GNU configuration name for the hardware/software
configuration of your system, as a string. The convenient way to test
parts of this string is with @code{string-match}.
This variable holds the standard GNU configuration name for the
hardware/software configuration of your system, as a string. The
convenient way to test parts of this string is with
@code{string-match}.
@end defvar
@defvar system-type
......
......@@ -169,7 +169,7 @@ function.
(shell-quote-argument "foo > bar")
@result{} "foo\\ \\>\\ bar"
;; @r{This example shows the behavior on MS-DOS and MS-Windows systems.}
;; @r{This example shows the behavior on MS-DOS and MS-Windows.}
(shell-quote-argument "foo > bar")
@result{} "\"foo > bar\""
@end example
......@@ -2277,13 +2277,16 @@ is COOKIES without the directory part."
(buffer-string))))
(sel (random (bindat-get-field info :count)))
(beg (cdar (bindat-get-field info :offset sel)))
(end (or (cdar (bindat-get-field info :offset (1+ sel)))
(end (or (cdar (bindat-get-field info
:offset (1+ sel)))
(nth 7 (file-attributes cookies)))))
(switch-to-buffer (get-buffer-create
(format "*Fortune Cookie: %s*"
(file-name-nondirectory cookies))))
(switch-to-buffer
(get-buffer-create
(format "*Fortune Cookie: %s*"
(file-name-nondirectory cookies))))
(erase-buffer)
(insert-file-contents-literally cookies nil beg (- end 3))))
(insert-file-contents-literally
cookies nil beg (- end 3))))
(defun fcookie-create-index (cookies &optional index delim)
"Scan file COOKIES, and write out its index file.
......@@ -2311,18 +2314,19 @@ COOKIES, indicates the border between entries."
offsets (cons (1- p) offsets))))
(with-temp-buffer
(set-buffer-multibyte nil)
(insert (string-make-unibyte
(bindat-pack
fcookie-index-spec
`((:version . 2)
(:count . ,count)
(:longest . ,max)
(:shortest . ,min)
(:flags . 0)
(:delim . ,delim)
(:offset . ,(mapcar (lambda (o)
(list (cons :foo o)))
(nreverse offsets)))))))
(insert
(string-make-unibyte
(bindat-pack
fcookie-index-spec
`((:version . 2)
(:count . ,count)
(:longest . ,max)
(:shortest . ,min)
(:flags . 0)
(:delim . ,delim)
(:offset . ,(mapcar (lambda (o)
(list (cons :foo o)))
(nreverse offsets)))))))
(let ((coding-system-for-write 'raw-text-unix))
(write-file (or index (concat cookies ".dat")))))))
@end lisp
......@@ -2392,7 +2396,7 @@ A binary data representation:
The corresponding decoded structure:
@lisp
(setq decoded-structure (bindat-unpack packet-spec binary-data))
(setq decoded (bindat-unpack packet-spec binary-data))
@result{}
((header
(dest-ip . [192 168 1 100])
......@@ -2415,7 +2419,7 @@ The corresponding decoded structure:
Fetching data from this structure:
@lisp
(bindat-get-field decoded-structure 'item 1 'id)
(bindat-get-field decoded 'item 1 'id)
@result{} "BCDEFG"
@end lisp
......
......@@ -244,16 +244,15 @@ first tries to match all three @samp{a}s; but the rest of the pattern is
The next alternative is for @samp{a*} to match only two @samp{a}s. With
this choice, the rest of the regexp matches successfully.@refill
Nested repetition operators can be extremely slow or loop infinitely
if they use repetition operators inside repetition operators. For
example, it could take hours for the regular expression
@samp{\(x+y*\)*a} to try to match the sequence
@samp{xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxz}, before it ultimately
fails. Emacs must try each way of grouping the 35 @samp{x}s before
concluding that none of them can work. Even worse, @samp{\(x*\)*} can
match the null string in infinitely many ways, so it causes an
infinite loop. To avoid these problems, check nested repetitions
carefully.
Nested repetition operators take a long time, or even forever, if they
lead to ambiguous matching. For example, trying to match the regular
expression @samp{\(x+y*\)*a} against the string
@samp{xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxz} could take hours before it
ultimately fails. Emacs must try each way of grouping the 35
@samp{x}s before concluding that none of them can work. Even worse,
@samp{\(x*\)*} can match the null string in infinitely many ways, so
it causes an infinite loop. To avoid these problems, check nested
repetitions carefully.
@item @samp{+}
@cindex @samp{+} in regexp
......@@ -347,9 +346,10 @@ different characters.
@item @samp{[^ @dots{} ]}
@cindex @samp{^} in regexp
@samp{[^} begins a @dfn{complemented character alternative}, which matches any
character except the ones specified. Thus, @samp{[^a-z0-9A-Z]} matches
all characters @emph{except} letters and digits.
@samp{[^} begins a @dfn{complemented character alternative}. This
matches any character except the ones specified. Thus,
@samp{[^a-z0-9A-Z]} matches all characters @emph{except} letters and
digits.
@samp{^} is not special in a character alternative unless it is the first
character. The character following the @samp{^} is treated as if it
......
......@@ -298,7 +298,8 @@ useful. If you need such a result, use an explicit value for
@var{separators}:
@example
(split-string " two words " split-string-default-separators)
(split-string " two words "
split-string-default-separators)
@result{} ("" "two" "words" "")
@end example
......@@ -353,8 +354,8 @@ practice:
@end defun
@defvar split-string-default-separators
The default value of @var{separators} for @code{split-string}, initially
@w{@samp{"[ \f\t\n\r\v]+"}}.
The default value of @var{separators} for @code{split-string}. Its
usual value is @w{@samp{"[ \f\t\n\r\v]+"}}.
@end defvar
@node Modifying Strings
......
......@@ -1497,10 +1497,10 @@ of justification. It can be @code{left}, @code{right}, @code{full},
follow specified justification style (see @code{current-justification},
below). @code{nil} means to do full justification.
If @var{eop} is non-@code{nil}, that means do left-justification if
@code{current-justification} specifies full justification. This is used
for the last line of a paragraph; even if the paragraph as a whole is
fully justified, the last line should not be.
If @var{eop} is non-@code{nil}, that means do only left-justification
if @code{current-justification} specifies full justification. This is
used for the last line of a paragraph; even if the paragraph as a
whole is fully justified, the last line should not be.
If @var{nosqueeze} is non-@code{nil}, that means do not change interior
whitespace.
......@@ -1727,12 +1727,11 @@ Adaptive Fill mode matches this regular expression against the text
starting after the left margin whitespace (if any) on a line; the
characters it matches are that line's candidate for the fill prefix.
The default value of this variable is
@w{@samp{"[ \t]*\\([-|#;>*]+[ \t]*\\|(?[0-9]+[.)][ \t]*\\)*"}}. This
matches a number enclosed in parentheses or followed by a period,
or certain punctuation characters, or any sequence of these
intermingled with whitespace. In particular, it matches a sequence of
whitespace, possibly empty.
@w{@samp{"[ \t]*\\([-|#;>*]+[ \t]*\\|(?[0-9]+[.)][ \t]*\\)*"}} is the
default value. This matches a number enclosed in parentheses or
followed by a period, or certain punctuation characters, or any
sequence of these intermingled with whitespace. In particular, it
matches a sequence of whitespace, possibly empty.
@end defopt
@defopt adaptive-fill-first-line-regexp
......@@ -2969,7 +2968,8 @@ A cons cell of the form @code{(foreground-color . @var{color-name})} or
just the foreground color or just the background color.
@code{(foreground-color . @var{color-name})} is equivalent to
@code{(:foreground @var{color-name})}, and likewise for the background.
specifying @code{(:foreground @var{color-name})}, and likewise for the
background.
@end itemize
You can use Font Lock Mode (@pxref{Font Lock Mode}), to dynamically
......@@ -3561,9 +3561,9 @@ The action code is always @code{t}.
For example, here is how Info mode handles @key{Mouse-1}:
@example
@smallexample
(define-key Info-mode-map [follow-link] 'mouse-face)
@end example
@end smallexample
@item a function
If the condition is a valid function, @var{func}, then a position
......@@ -3574,11 +3574,11 @@ action code.
For example, here is how pcvs enables @key{Mouse-1} to follow links on
file names only:
@example
@smallexample
(define-key map [follow-link]
(lambda (pos)
(if (eq (get-char-property pos 'face) 'cvs-filename-face) t)))
@end example
(eq (get-char-property pos 'face) 'cvs-filename-face)))
@end smallexample
@item anything else
If the condition value is anything else, then the position is inside a
......
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