Commit 350287ef authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

(Top): Add Diff Mode to menu.

parent fe5c1408
......@@ -89,9 +89,9 @@ some of how to customize it; it corresponds to GNU Emacs version
@value{EMACSVER}.
@ifinfo
If you never before used the Info documentation system, type @kbd{h},
and Emacs will take you to a programmed instruction sequence for the
Info commands.
To learn more about the Info documentation system, type @kbd{h}, and
Emacs will take you to a programmed instruction sequence for the Info
commands.
@end ifinfo
For information on extending Emacs, see @ref{Top, Emacs Lisp,, elisp, The
......@@ -197,6 +197,7 @@ Advanced Features
* Sorting:: Sorting lines, paragraphs or pages within Emacs.
* Narrowing:: Restricting display and editing to a portion
of the buffer.
* Diff Mode:: Editing diff output.
* Two-Column:: Splitting apart columns to edit them
in side-by-side windows.
* Editing Binary Files::Using Hexl mode to edit binary files.
......@@ -286,7 +287,7 @@ Killing and Moving Text
* Killing by Lines:: How to kill entire lines of text at one time.
* Other Kill Commands:: Commands to kill large regions of text and
syntactic units such as words and sentences.
* Graphical Kill:: The kill ring on graphical terminals:
* Graphical Kill:: The kill ring on graphical displays:
yanking between applications.
* CUA Bindings:: Using @kbd{C-x}, @kbd{C-c}, @kbd{C-v} for copy
and paste, with enhanced rectangle support.
......@@ -867,47 +868,47 @@ Emacs and Microsoft Windows
@unnumbered Preface
This manual documents the use and simple customization of the Emacs
editor. The reader is not expected to be a programmer; simple
customizations do not require programming skill. The user who is not
interested in customizing can ignore the scattered customization hints.
editor. Simple Emacs customizations do not require you to be a
programmer, but if you are not interested in customizing, you can
ignore the customization hints.
This is primarily a reference manual, but can also be used as a
primer. For complete beginners, it is a good idea to start with the
on-line, learn-by-doing tutorial, before reading the manual. To run the
tutorial, start Emacs and type @kbd{C-h t}. This way you can learn
Emacs by using Emacs on a specially designed file which describes
commands, tells you when to try them, and then explains the results you
see.
primer. If you are a complete beginner, we recommend you start with
the on-line, learn-by-doing tutorial, before reading the manual. To
run the tutorial, start Emacs and type @kbd{C-h t}. The tutorial
describes commands, tells you when to try them, and explains the
results.
On first reading, just skim chapters 1 and 2, which describe the
notational conventions of the manual and the general appearance of the
Emacs display screen. Note which questions are answered in these
chapters, so you can refer back later. After reading chapter 4, you
should practice the commands there. The next few chapters describe
fundamental techniques and concepts that are used constantly. You need
to understand them thoroughly, experimenting with them if necessary.
should practice the commands shown there. The next few chapters
describe fundamental techniques and concepts that are used constantly.
You need to understand them thoroughly, so experiment with them
until you are fluent.
Chapters 14 through 19 describe intermediate-level features that are
useful for all kinds of editing. Chapter 20 and following chapters
describe features that you may or may not want to use; read those
chapters when you need them.
useful for many kinds of editing. Chapter 20 and following chapters
describe optional but useful features; read those chapters when you
need them.
Read the Trouble chapter if Emacs does not seem to be working
properly. It explains how to cope with some common problems
properly. It explains how to cope with several common problems
(@pxref{Lossage}), as well as when and how to report Emacs bugs
(@pxref{Bugs}).
To find the documentation on a particular command, look in the index.
Keys (character commands) and command names have separate indexes. There
is also a glossary, with a cross reference for each term.
To find the documentation of a particular command, look in the index.
Keys (character commands) and command names have separate indexes.
There is also a glossary, with a cross reference for each term.
This manual is available as a printed book and also as an Info file.
The Info file is for on-line perusal with the Info program, which will
be the principal way of viewing documentation on-line in the GNU system.
Both the Info file and the Info program itself are distributed along
with GNU Emacs. The Info file and the printed book contain
substantially the same text and are generated from the same source
files, which are also distributed along with GNU Emacs.
The Info file is for on-line perusal with the Info program, which is
the principal means of accessing on-line documentation in the GNU
system. Both the Emacs Info file and an Info reader are included with
GNU Emacs. The Info file and the printed book contain substantially
the same text and are generated from the same source files, which are
also distributed with GNU Emacs.
GNU Emacs is a member of the Emacs editor family. There are many
Emacs editors, all sharing common principles of organization. For
......@@ -1058,59 +1059,51 @@ T.@: Zimmermann, Reto Zimmermann, Neal Ziring, and Detlev Zundel.
@node Intro, Glossary, Distrib, Top
@unnumbered Introduction
You are reading about GNU Emacs, the GNU incarnation of the advanced,
self-documenting, customizable, extensible real-time display editor Emacs.
You are reading about GNU Emacs, the GNU incarnation of the
advanced, self-documenting, customizable, extensible editor Emacs.
(The `G' in `GNU' is not silent.)
We say that Emacs is a @dfn{display} editor because normally the text
being edited is visible on the screen and is updated automatically as you
type your commands. @xref{Screen,Display}.
We call it a @dfn{real-time} editor because the display is updated very
frequently, usually after each character or pair of characters you
type. This minimizes the amount of information you must keep in your
head as you edit. @xref{Basic,Real-time,Basic Editing}.
We call Emacs advanced because it provides facilities that go beyond
simple insertion and deletion: controlling subprocesses; automatic
indentation of programs; viewing two or more files at once; editing
formatted text; and dealing in terms of characters, words, lines,
sentences, paragraphs, and pages, as well as expressions and comments in
several different programming languages.
We call Emacs advanced because it provides much more than simple
insertion and deletion. It can control subprocesses, indent programs
automatically, show two or more files at once, and edit formatted
text. Emacs editing commands operate in terms of characters, words,
lines, sentences, paragraphs, and pages, as well as expressions and
comments in various programming languages.
@dfn{Self-documenting} means that at any time you can type a special
character, @kbd{Control-h}, to find out what your options are. You can
also use it to find out what any command does, or to find all the commands
that pertain to a topic. @xref{Help}.
@dfn{Customizable} means that you can change the definitions of Emacs
commands in little ways. For example, if you use a programming language in
which comments start with @samp{<**} and end with @samp{**>}, you can tell
the Emacs comment manipulation commands to use those strings
(@pxref{Comments}). Another sort of customization is rearrangement of the
command set. For example, if you prefer the four basic cursor motion
commands (up, down, left and right) on keys in a diamond pattern on the
keyboard, you can rebind the keys that way. @xref{Customization}.
@dfn{Extensible} means that you can go beyond simple customization and
write entirely new commands, programs in the Lisp language to be run by
Emacs's own Lisp interpreter. Emacs is an ``on-line extensible''
system, which means that it is divided into many functions that call
each other, any of which can be redefined in the middle of an editing
session. Almost any part of Emacs can be replaced without making a
separate copy of all of Emacs. Most of the editing commands of Emacs
are written in Lisp; the few exceptions could have been written
in Lisp but are written in C for efficiency. Although only a programmer
can write an extension, anybody can use it afterward. @xref{Top,
Emacs Lisp Intro, Preface, eintr, An Introduction to Programming in
Emacs Lisp}, if you want to learn Emacs Lisp programming.
@dfn{Customizable} means that you can alter Emacs commands' behavior
in simple ways. For example, if you use a programming language in
which comments start with @samp{<**} and end with @samp{**>}, you can
tell the Emacs comment manipulation commands to use those strings
(@pxref{Comments}). Another sort of customization is rearrangement of
the command set. For example, you can rebind the basic cursor motion
commands (up, down, left and right) to any keys on the keyboard that
you find comfortable. @xref{Customization}.
@dfn{Extensible} means that you can go beyond simple customization
and write entirely new commands---programs in the Lisp language to be
run by Emacs's own Lisp interpreter. Emacs is an ``on-line
extensible'' system, which means that it is divided into many
functions that call each other, any of which can be redefined in the
middle of an editing session. Almost any part of Emacs can be
replaced without making a separate copy of all of Emacs. Most of the
editing commands of Emacs are written in Lisp; the few exceptions
could have been written in Lisp but use C instead for efficiency.
Writing an extension is programming, but non-programmers can use it
afterwards. @xref{Top, Emacs Lisp Intro, Preface, eintr, An
Introduction to Programming in Emacs Lisp}, if you want to learn Emacs
Lisp programming.
When running on a graphical display, Emacs provides its own menus
and convenient handling of mouse buttons. But Emacs provides many of
the benefits of a graphical display even on a text-only terminal. For
instance, it can highlight parts of a file, display and edit several
files at once, move text between files, and edit files while running
shell commands.
and convenient handling of mouse buttons. In addition, Emacs provides
many of the benefits of a graphical display even on a text-only
terminal. For instance, it can highlight parts of a file, display and
edit several files at once, move text between files, and edit files
while running shell commands.
@include screen.texi
@include commands.texi
......
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