Commit 35dc09a1 authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris
Browse files

Merge from emacs-24, up to 2012-04-10T02:06:19Z!larsi@gnus.org

parents 327732d9 ad3a2b41
2012-04-14 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* mule.texi (Select Input Method, Coding Systems, Recognize Coding):
Copyedits.
(Coding Systems): Mac OS X apparently uses newlines for EOL.
(Recognize Coding): Remove old auto-coding-regexp-alist example.
auto-coding-functions does not override coding: tags.
Remove rmail-decode-mime-charset; it no longer has any effect.
2012-04-14 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
* custom.texi (Creating Custom Themes): Add reference to Custom
Themes node in Lisp manual.
2012-04-14 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* mule.texi (International): Copyedits.
(International Chars): Update C-x = example output.
(Disabling Multibyte): Rename from "Enabling Multibyte".
Clarify what "unibyte: t" does, and mode-line description.
(Unibyte Mode): Update for "Disabling Multibyte" node name change.
Use Texinfo recommended convention for quotes+punctuation.
(Language Environments): Copyedits.
(Input Methods): Copyedits. Use "^" for the postfix example,
because it is less confusing inside Info's `quotes'.
* custom.texi (Specifying File Variables): Fix "unibyte" description.
Update for "Disabling Multibyte" node name change.
* emacs.texi: Update for "Disabling Multibyte" node name change.
* abbrevs.texi, arevert-xtra.texi, buffers.texi, building.texi:
* cmdargs.texi, custom.texi, entering.texi, files.texi, frames.texi:
* glossary.texi, help.texi, macos.texi, maintaining.texi, mini.texi:
* misc.texi, package.texi, programs.texi, screen.texi, search.texi:
* sending.texi, text.texi, trouble.texi:
Use @file for buffers, per the Texinfo manual.
* entering.texi (Entering Emacs):
Do not mention initial-buffer-choice = t.
* misc.texi (Gnus Startup): Use @env for environment variables.
* Makefile.in: Replace non-portable use of $< in ordinary rules.
2012-04-12 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* ack.texi (Acknowledgments): Don't mention obsolete mailpost.el.
......
#### Makefile for the Emacs Manual
# Copyright (C) 1994, 1996-2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
# Copyright (C) 1994, 1996-2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
# This file is part of GNU Emacs.
......@@ -127,31 +127,31 @@ ps: emacs.ps
# Note that all the Info targets build the Info files in srcdir.
# There is no provision for Info files to exist in the build directory.
# In a distribution of Emacs, the Info files should be up to date.
# Note: "<" is not portable in ordinary make rules.
$(infodir)/emacs: ${EMACSSOURCES}
$(mkinfodir)
$(MAKEINFO) $(MAKEINFO_OPTS) -o $@ $<
$(MAKEINFO) $(MAKEINFO_OPTS) -o $@ ${srcdir}/emacs.texi
emacs.dvi: ${EMACSSOURCES}
$(ENVADD) $(TEXI2DVI) $<
$(ENVADD) $(TEXI2DVI) ${srcdir}/emacs.texi
emacs.ps: emacs.dvi
$(DVIPS) -o $@ $<
$(DVIPS) -o $@ emacs.dvi
emacs.pdf: ${EMACSSOURCES}
$(ENVADD) $(TEXI2PDF) $<
$(ENVADD) $(TEXI2PDF) ${srcdir}/emacs.texi
emacs.html: ${EMACSSOURCES}
$(MAKEINFO) $(MAKEINFO_OPTS) --html -o $@ $<
$(MAKEINFO) $(MAKEINFO_OPTS) --html -o $@ ${srcdir}/emacs.texi
emacs-xtra.dvi: $(EMACS_XTRA)
$(ENVADD) $(TEXI2DVI) $<
$(ENVADD) $(TEXI2DVI) ${srcdir}/emacs-xtra.texi
emacs-xtra.ps: emacs-xtra.dvi
$(DVIPS) -o $@ $<
$(DVIPS) -o $@ emacs-xtra.dvi
emacs-xtra.pdf: $(EMACS_XTRA)
$(ENVADD) $(TEXI2PDF) $<
$(ENVADD) $(TEXI2PDF) ${srcdir}/emacs-xtra.texi
.PHONY: mostlyclean clean distclean maintainer-clean infoclean
......
......@@ -261,12 +261,12 @@ expands to itself, and save it to your abbrev file.
@kbd{M-x edit-abbrevs} allows you to add, change or kill abbrev
definitions by editing a list of them in an Emacs buffer. The list has
the same format described above. The buffer of abbrevs is called
@samp{*Abbrevs*}, and is in Edit-Abbrevs mode. Type @kbd{C-c C-c} in
@file{*Abbrevs*}, and is in Edit-Abbrevs mode. Type @kbd{C-c C-c} in
this buffer to install the abbrev definitions as specified in the
buffer---and delete any abbrev definitions not listed.
The command @code{edit-abbrevs} is actually the same as
@code{list-abbrevs} except that it selects the buffer @samp{*Abbrevs*}
@code{list-abbrevs} except that it selects the buffer @file{*Abbrevs*}
whereas @code{list-abbrevs} merely displays it in another window.
@node Saving Abbrevs
......
......@@ -93,8 +93,8 @@ deleting or changing marks or flags will mark it modified again.
Remote Dired buffers are not auto-reverted (because it may be slow).
Neither are Dired buffers for which you used shell wildcards or file
arguments to list only some of the files. @samp{*Find*} and
@samp{*Locate*} buffers do not auto-revert either.
arguments to list only some of the files. @file{*Find*} and
@file{*Locate*} buffers do not auto-revert either.
@c FIXME? This should be in the elisp manual?
@node Supporting additional buffers
......
......@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@
the file's text. Each time you invoke Dired, a buffer is used to hold
the directory listing. If you send a message with @kbd{C-x m}, a
buffer is used to hold the text of the message. When you ask for a
command's documentation, that appears in a buffer named @samp{*Help*}.
command's documentation, that appears in a buffer named @file{*Help*}.
Each buffer has a unique name, which can be of any length. When a
buffer is displayed in a window, its name is shown in the mode line
......@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ buffer is displayed in a window, its name is shown in the mode line
matters in buffer names. Most buffers are made by visiting files, and
their names are derived from the files' names; however, you can also
create an empty buffer with any name you want. A newly started Emacs
has several buffers, including one named @samp{*scratch*}, which can
has several buffers, including one named @file{*scratch*}, which can
be used for evaluating Lisp expressions and is not associated with any
file (@pxref{Lisp Interaction}).
......@@ -198,7 +198,7 @@ CRM Buffer Size Mode File
@end smallexample
@noindent
The buffer @samp{*Help*} was made by a help request (@pxref{Help}); it
The buffer @file{*Help*} was made by a help request (@pxref{Help}); it
is not visiting any file. The buffer @code{src} was made by Dired on
the directory @file{~/cvs/emacs/src/}. You can list only buffers that
are visiting files by giving the command a prefix argument, as in
......@@ -248,9 +248,9 @@ happens and no renaming is done.
@kbd{M-x rename-uniquely} renames the current buffer to a similar
name with a numeric suffix added to make it both different and unique.
This command does not need an argument. It is useful for creating
multiple shell buffers: if you rename the @samp{*shell*} buffer, then
multiple shell buffers: if you rename the @file{*shell*} buffer, then
do @kbd{M-x shell} again, it makes a new shell buffer named
@samp{*shell*}; meanwhile, the old shell buffer continues to exist
@file{*shell*}; meanwhile, the old shell buffer continues to exist
under its new name. This method is also good for mail buffers,
compilation buffers, and most Emacs features that create special
buffers with particular names. (With some of these features, such as
......@@ -354,7 +354,7 @@ operations on buffers, through an interface similar to Dired
@findex buffer-menu
@findex buffer-menu-other-window
To use the buffer menu, type @kbd{C-x C-b} and switch to the window
displaying the @samp{*Buffer List*} buffer. You can also type
displaying the @file{*Buffer List*} buffer. You can also type
@kbd{M-x buffer-menu} to open the buffer menu in the selected window.
Alternatively, the command @kbd{M-x buffer-menu-other-window} opens
the buffer menu in another window, and selects that window.
......@@ -409,11 +409,11 @@ Quit the buffer menu---immediately display the most recent formerly
visible buffer in its place.
@item @key{RET}
@itemx f
Immediately select this line's buffer in place of the @samp{*Buffer
Immediately select this line's buffer in place of the @file{*Buffer
List*} buffer.
@item o
Immediately select this line's buffer in another window as if by
@kbd{C-x 4 b}, leaving @samp{*Buffer List*} visible.
@kbd{C-x 4 b}, leaving @file{*Buffer List*} visible.
@item C-o
Immediately display this line's buffer in another window, but don't
select the window.
......@@ -422,7 +422,7 @@ Immediately select this line's buffer in a full-screen window.
@item 2
Immediately set up two windows, with this line's buffer selected in
one, and the previously current buffer (aside from the buffer
@samp{*Buffer List*}) displayed in the other.
@file{*Buffer List*}) displayed in the other.
@item b
Bury the buffer listed on this line.
@item m
......@@ -448,19 +448,19 @@ the inclusion of such buffers in the buffer list.
suitable buffer, and turn on Buffer Menu mode in it. Everything else
described above is implemented by the special commands provided in
Buffer Menu mode. One consequence of this is that you can switch from
the @samp{*Buffer List*} buffer to another Emacs buffer, and edit
there. You can reselect the @samp{*Buffer List*} buffer later, to
the @file{*Buffer List*} buffer to another Emacs buffer, and edit
there. You can reselect the @file{*Buffer List*} buffer later, to
perform the operations already requested, or you can kill it, or pay
no further attention to it.
Normally, the buffer @samp{*Buffer List*} is not updated
Normally, the buffer @file{*Buffer List*} is not updated
automatically when buffers are created and killed; its contents are
just text. If you have created, deleted or renamed buffers, the way
to update @samp{*Buffer List*} to show what you have done is to type
to update @file{*Buffer List*} to show what you have done is to type
@kbd{g} (@code{revert-buffer}). You can make this happen regularly
every @code{auto-revert-interval} seconds if you enable Auto Revert
mode in this buffer, as long as it is not marked modified. Global
Auto Revert mode applies to the @samp{*Buffer List*} buffer only if
Auto Revert mode applies to the @file{*Buffer List*} buffer only if
@code{global-auto-revert-non-file-buffers} is non-@code{nil}.
@iftex
@inforef{Autorevert,, emacs-xtra}, for details.
......
......@@ -44,7 +44,7 @@ messages and show you where the errors occurred.
@table @kbd
@item M-x compile
Run a compiler asynchronously under Emacs, with error messages going to
the @samp{*compilation*} buffer.
the @file{*compilation*} buffer.
@item M-x recompile
Invoke a compiler with the same command as in the last invocation of
@kbd{M-x compile}.
......@@ -57,7 +57,7 @@ Kill the running compilation subprocess.
compile}. This reads a shell command line using the minibuffer, and
then executes the command by running a shell as a subprocess (or
@dfn{inferior process}) of Emacs. The output is inserted in a buffer
named @samp{*compilation*}. The current buffer's default directory is
named @file{*compilation*}. The current buffer's default directory is
used as the working directory for the execution of the command;
normally, therefore, compilation takes place in this directory.
......@@ -72,19 +72,19 @@ specified is automatically stored in the variable
type @kbd{M-x compile}. A file can also specify a file-local value
for @code{compile-command} (@pxref{File Variables}).
Starting a compilation displays the @samp{*compilation*} buffer in
Starting a compilation displays the @file{*compilation*} buffer in
another window but does not select it. While the compilation is
running, the word @samp{run} is shown in the major mode indicator for
the @samp{*compilation*} buffer, and the word @samp{Compiling} appears
in all mode lines. You do not have to keep the @samp{*compilation*}
the @file{*compilation*} buffer, and the word @samp{Compiling} appears
in all mode lines. You do not have to keep the @file{*compilation*}
buffer visible while compilation is running; it continues in any case.
When the compilation ends, for whatever reason, the mode line of the
@samp{*compilation*} buffer changes to say @samp{exit} (followed by
@file{*compilation*} buffer changes to say @samp{exit} (followed by
the exit code: @samp{[0]} for a normal exit), or @samp{signal} (if a
signal terminated the process).
If you want to watch the compilation transcript as it appears,
switch to the @samp{*compilation*} buffer and move point to the end of
switch to the @file{*compilation*} buffer and move point to the end of
the buffer. When point is at the end, new compilation output is
inserted above point, which remains at the end. Otherwise, point
remains fixed while compilation output is added at the end of the
......@@ -93,7 +93,7 @@ buffer.
@cindex compilation buffer, keeping point at end
@vindex compilation-scroll-output
If you change the variable @code{compilation-scroll-output} to a
non-@code{nil} value, the @samp{*compilation*} buffer scrolls
non-@code{nil} value, the @file{*compilation*} buffer scrolls
automatically to follow the output. If the value is
@code{first-error}, scrolling stops when the first error appears,
leaving point at that error. For any other non-@code{nil} value,
......@@ -103,22 +103,22 @@ scrolling continues until there is no more output.
To rerun the last compilation with the same command, type @kbd{M-x
recompile}. This reuses the compilation command from the last
invocation of @kbd{M-x compile}. It also reuses the
@samp{*compilation*} buffer and starts the compilation in its default
@file{*compilation*} buffer and starts the compilation in its default
directory, which is the directory in which the previous compilation
was started.
@findex kill-compilation
Starting a new compilation also kills any compilation already
running in @samp{*compilation*}, as the buffer can only handle one
running in @file{*compilation*}, as the buffer can only handle one
compilation at any time. However, @kbd{M-x compile} asks for
confirmation before actually killing a compilation that is running.
You can also kill the compilation process with @kbd{M-x
kill-compilation}.
To run two compilations at once, start the first one, then rename
the @samp{*compilation*} buffer (perhaps using @code{rename-uniquely};
the @file{*compilation*} buffer (perhaps using @code{rename-uniquely};
@pxref{Misc Buffer}), then switch buffers and start the other
compilation. This will create a new @samp{*compilation*} buffer.
compilation. This will create a new @file{*compilation*} buffer.
@vindex compilation-environment
You can control the environment passed to the compilation command
......@@ -133,7 +133,7 @@ variable settings override the usual ones.
@cindex Compilation mode
@cindex mode, Compilation
@cindex locus
The @samp{*compilation*} buffer uses a major mode called Compilation
The @file{*compilation*} buffer uses a major mode called Compilation
mode. Compilation mode turns each error message in the buffer into a
hyperlink; you can move point to it and type @key{RET}, or click on it
with the mouse (@pxref{Mouse References}), to visit the @dfn{locus} of
......@@ -145,10 +145,10 @@ position in a file where that error occurred.
If you change the variable
@code{compilation-auto-jump-to-first-error} to a non-@code{nil} value,
Emacs automatically visits the locus of the first error message that
appears in the @samp{*compilation*} buffer.
appears in the @file{*compilation*} buffer.
Compilation mode provides the following additional commands. These
commands can also be used in @samp{*grep*} buffers, where the
commands can also be used in @file{*grep*} buffers, where the
hyperlinks are search matches rather than error messages (@pxref{Grep
Searching}).
......@@ -190,7 +190,7 @@ mode buffer. The first time you invoke it after a compilation, it
visits the locus of the first error message. Each subsequent
@w{@kbd{C-x `}} visits the next error, in a similar fashion. If you
visit a specific error with @key{RET} or a mouse click in the
@samp{*compilation*} buffer, subsequent @w{@kbd{C-x `}} commands
@file{*compilation*} buffer, subsequent @w{@kbd{C-x `}} commands
advance from there. When @w{@kbd{C-x `}} finds no more error messages
to visit, it signals an error. @w{@kbd{C-u C-x `}} starts again from
the beginning of the compilation buffer, and visits the first locus.
......@@ -199,8 +199,8 @@ the beginning of the compilation buffer, and visits the first locus.
through errors in the opposite direction.
The @code{next-error} and @code{previous-error} commands don't just
act on the errors or matches listed in @samp{*compilation*} and
@samp{*grep*} buffers; they also know how to iterate through error or
act on the errors or matches listed in @file{*compilation*} and
@file{*grep*} buffers; they also know how to iterate through error or
match lists produced by other commands, such as @kbd{M-x occur}
(@pxref{Other Repeating Search}). If you are already in a buffer
containing error messages or matches, those are the ones that are
......@@ -224,7 +224,7 @@ highlights the relevant source line. The duration of this highlight
is determined by the variable @code{next-error-highlight}.
@vindex compilation-context-lines
If the @samp{*compilation*} buffer is shown in a window with a left
If the @file{*compilation*} buffer is shown in a window with a left
fringe (@pxref{Fringes}), the locus-visiting commands put an arrow in
the fringe, pointing to the current error message. If the window has
no left fringe, such as on a text-only terminal, these commands scroll
......@@ -276,7 +276,7 @@ Names}).
command, but specifies the option for a noninteractive shell. This
means, in particular, that the shell should start with no prompt. If
you find your usual shell prompt making an unsightly appearance in the
@samp{*compilation*} buffer, it means you have made a mistake in your
@file{*compilation*} buffer, it means you have made a mistake in your
shell's init file by setting the prompt unconditionally. (This init
file may be named @file{.bashrc}, @file{.profile}, @file{.cshrc},
@file{.shrc}, etc., depending on what shell you use.) The shell init
......@@ -339,14 +339,14 @@ mode (@pxref{Compilation Mode}).
@item M-x grep
@itemx M-x lgrep
Run @command{grep} asynchronously under Emacs, listing matching lines in
the buffer named @samp{*grep*}.
the buffer named @file{*grep*}.
@item M-x grep-find
@itemx M-x find-grep
@itemx M-x rgrep
Run @command{grep} via @code{find}, and collect output in the
@samp{*grep*} buffer.
@file{*grep*} buffer.
@item M-x zrgrep
Run @code{zgrep} and collect output in the @samp{*grep*} buffer.
Run @code{zgrep} and collect output in the @file{*grep*} buffer.
@item M-x kill-grep
Kill the running @command{grep} subprocess.
@end table
......@@ -369,7 +369,7 @@ can chain @command{grep} commands, like this:
grep -nH -e foo *.el | grep bar | grep toto
@end example
The output from @command{grep} goes in the @samp{*grep*} buffer. You
The output from @command{grep} goes in the @file{*grep*} buffer. You
can find the corresponding lines in the original files using @w{@kbd{C-x
`}}, @key{RET}, and so forth, just like compilation errors.
......@@ -1506,14 +1506,14 @@ commands are used; its default is @code{t}.
@section Lisp Interaction Buffers
@findex lisp-interaction-mode
When Emacs starts up, it contains a buffer named @samp{*scratch*},
When Emacs starts up, it contains a buffer named @file{*scratch*},
which is provided for evaluating Emacs Lisp expressions interactively.
Its major mode is Lisp Interaction mode. You can also enable Lisp
Interaction mode by typing @kbd{M-x lisp-interaction-mode}.
@findex eval-print-last-sexp
@kindex C-j @r{(Lisp Interaction mode)}
In the @samp{*scratch*} buffer, and other Lisp Interaction mode
In the @file{*scratch*} buffer, and other Lisp Interaction mode
buffers, @kbd{C-j} (@code{eval-print-last-sexp}) evaluates the Lisp
expression before point, and inserts the value at point. Thus, as you
type expressions into the buffer followed by @kbd{C-j} after each
......@@ -1522,7 +1522,7 @@ expressions and their values. All other commands in Lisp Interaction
mode are the same as in Emacs Lisp mode.
@vindex initial-scratch-message
At startup, the @samp{*scratch*} buffer contains a short message, in
At startup, the @file{*scratch*} buffer contains a short message, in
the form of a Lisp comment, that explains what it is for. This
message is controlled by the variable @code{initial-scratch-message},
which should be either a string, or @code{nil} (which means to
......@@ -1533,7 +1533,7 @@ suppress the message).
interactively is to use Inferior Emacs Lisp mode, which provides an
interface rather like Shell mode (@pxref{Shell Mode}) for evaluating
Emacs Lisp expressions. Type @kbd{M-x ielm} to create an
@samp{*ielm*} buffer which uses this mode. For more information, see
@file{*ielm*} buffer which uses this mode. For more information, see
that command's documentation.
@node External Lisp
......@@ -1555,13 +1555,13 @@ whose names end in @file{.l}, @file{.lsp}, or @file{.lisp}.
evaluated. To begin an external Lisp session, type @kbd{M-x
run-lisp}. This runs the program named @command{lisp}, and sets it up
so that both input and output go through an Emacs buffer named
@samp{*inferior-lisp*}. To change the name of the Lisp program run by
@file{*inferior-lisp*}. To change the name of the Lisp program run by
@kbd{M-x run-lisp}, change the variable @code{inferior-lisp-program}.
The major mode for the @samp{*lisp*} buffer is Inferior Lisp mode,
The major mode for the @file{*lisp*} buffer is Inferior Lisp mode,
which combines the characteristics of Lisp mode and Shell mode
(@pxref{Shell Mode}). To send input to the Lisp session, go to the
end of the @samp{*lisp*} buffer and type the input, followed by
end of the @file{*lisp*} buffer and type the input, followed by
@key{RET}. Terminal output from the Lisp session is automatically
inserted in the buffer.
......@@ -1572,7 +1572,7 @@ inserted in the buffer.
buffer to a Lisp session that you had started with @kbd{M-x run-lisp}.
The expression sent is the top-level Lisp expression at or following
point. The resulting value goes as usual into the
@samp{*inferior-lisp*} buffer. Note that the effect of @kbd{C-M-x} in
@file{*inferior-lisp*} buffer. Note that the effect of @kbd{C-M-x} in
Lisp mode is thus very similar to its effect in Emacs Lisp mode
(@pxref{Lisp Eval}), except that the expression is sent to a different
Lisp environment instead of being evaluated in Emacs.
......@@ -1587,4 +1587,4 @@ to a Scheme subprocess, are very similar. Scheme source files are
edited in Scheme mode, which can be explicitly enabled with @kbd{M-x
scheme-mode}. You can initiate a Scheme session by typing @kbd{M-x
run-scheme} (the buffer for interacting with Scheme is named
@samp{*scheme*}), and send expressions to it by typing @kbd{C-M-x}.
@file{*scheme*}), and send expressions to it by typing @kbd{C-M-x}.
......@@ -157,7 +157,7 @@ Evaluate Lisp expression @var{expression}.
@item --insert=@var{file}
@opindex --insert
@cindex insert file contents, command-line argument
Insert the contents of @var{file} into the @samp{*scratch*} buffer
Insert the contents of @var{file} into the @file{*scratch*} buffer
(@pxref{Lisp Interaction}). This is like what @kbd{M-x insert-file}
does (@pxref{Misc File Ops}).
......
......@@ -561,7 +561,7 @@ format of a theme file and how to make one.
@vindex custom-theme-directory
@cindex color scheme
Type @kbd{M-x customize-themes} to switch to a buffer named
@samp{*Custom Themes*}, which lists the Custom themes that Emacs knows
@file{*Custom Themes*}, which lists the Custom themes that Emacs knows
about. By default, Emacs looks for theme files in two locations: the
directory specified by the variable @code{custom-theme-directory}
(which defaults to @file{~/.emacs.d/}), and a directory named
......@@ -580,11 +580,11 @@ add the directory name to the list variable
@code{custom-theme-directory} has the special meaning of the value of
the variable @code{custom-theme-directory}, while @code{t} stands for
the built-in theme directory @file{etc/themes}. The themes listed in
the @samp{*Custom Themes*} buffer are those found in the directories
the @file{*Custom Themes*} buffer are those found in the directories
specified by @code{custom-theme-load-path}.
@kindex C-x C-s @r{(Custom Themes buffer)}
In the @samp{*Custom Themes*} buffer, you can activate the checkbox
In the @file{*Custom Themes*} buffer, you can activate the checkbox
next to a Custom theme to enable or disable the theme for the current
Emacs session. When a Custom theme is enabled, all of its settings
(variables and faces) take effect in the Emacs session. To apply the
......@@ -608,7 +608,7 @@ always considered safe.
Setting or saving Custom themes actually works by customizing the
variable @code{custom-enabled-themes}. The value of this variable is
a list of Custom theme names (as Lisp symbols, e.g.@: @code{tango}).
Instead of using the @samp{*Custom Themes*} buffer to set
Instead of using the @file{*Custom Themes*} buffer to set
@code{custom-enabled-themes}, you can customize the variable using the
usual customization interface, e.g.@: with @kbd{M-x customize-option}.
Note that Custom themes are not allowed to set
......@@ -635,7 +635,7 @@ type @kbd{M-x disable-theme}.
@findex describe-theme
To see a description of a Custom theme, type @kbd{?} on its line in
the @samp{*Custom Themes*} buffer; or type @kbd{M-x describe-theme}
the @file{*Custom Themes*} buffer; or type @kbd{M-x describe-theme}
anywhere in Emacs and enter the theme name in the minibuffer.
@node Creating Custom Themes
......@@ -645,12 +645,12 @@ anywhere in Emacs and enter the theme name in the minibuffer.
@findex customize-create-theme
You can define a Custom theme using an interface similar to the
customization buffer, by typing @kbd{M-x customize-create-theme}.
This switches to a buffer named @samp{*Custom Theme*}. It also offers
This switches to a buffer named @file{*Custom Theme*}. It also offers
to insert some common Emacs faces into the theme (a convenience, since
Custom themes are often used to customize faces). If you answer no,
the theme will initially contain no settings.
Near the top of the @samp{*Custom Theme*} buffer are editable fields
Near the top of the @file{*Custom Theme*} buffer are editable fields
where you can enter the theme's name and description. The name can be
anything except @samp{user}. The description is the one that will be
shown when you invoke @kbd{M-x describe-theme} for the theme. Its
......@@ -673,7 +673,7 @@ theme, uncheck the checkbox next to its name.
@file{@var{name}-theme.el} where @var{name} is the theme name, in the
directory named by @code{custom-theme-directory}.
From the @samp{*Custom Theme*} buffer, you can view and edit an
From the @file{*Custom Theme*} buffer, you can view and edit an
existing Custom theme by activating the @samp{[Visit Theme]} button
and specifying the theme name. You can also add the settings of
another theme into the buffer, using the @samp{[Merge Theme]} button.
......@@ -683,10 +683,9 @@ the @samp{[Merge Theme]} button and specifying the special theme named
A theme file is simply an Emacs Lisp source file, and loading the
Custom theme works by loading the Lisp file. Therefore, you can edit
a theme file directly instead of using the @samp{*Custom Theme*}
buffer.
@c Add link to the relevant Emacs Lisp Reference manual node, once
@c that is written.
a theme file directly instead of using the @file{*Custom Theme*}
buffer. @xref{Custom Themes,,, elisp, The Emacs Lisp Reference
Manual}, for details.
@node Variables
@section Variables
......@@ -809,7 +808,7 @@ can set any variable with a Lisp expression like this:
@noindent
To execute such an expression, type @kbd{M-:} (@code{eval-expression})
and enter the expression in the minibuffer (@pxref{Lisp Eval}).
Alternatively, go to the @samp{*scratch*} buffer, type in the
Alternatively, go to the @file{*scratch*} buffer, type in the
expression, and then type @kbd{C-j} (@pxref{Lisp Interaction}).
Setting variables, like all means of customizing Emacs except where
......@@ -1163,8 +1162,8 @@ returned by that expression is ignored).
conversion of this file. @xref{Coding Systems}.
@item
@code{unibyte} says to visit the file in a unibyte buffer, if the
value is @code{t}. @xref{Enabling Multibyte}.
@code{unibyte} says to load or compile a file of Emacs Lisp in unibyte
mode, if the value is @code{t}. @xref{Disabling Multibyte}.
@end itemize
@noindent
......
......@@ -516,7 +516,7 @@ Frames and Graphical Displays
International Character Set Support
* International Chars:: Basic concepts of multibyte characters.
* Enabling Multibyte:: Controlling whether to use multibyte characters.
* Disabling Multibyte:: Controlling whether to use multibyte characters.
* Language Environments:: Setting things up for the language you use.
* Input Methods:: Entering text characters not on your keyboard.
* Select Input Method:: Specifying your choice of input methods.
......
......@@ -63,7 +63,7 @@ certain Lisp files, where to put the initial frame, and so forth.
If the variable @code{inhibit-startup-screen} is non-@code{nil},
Emacs does not display the startup screen. In that case, if one or
more files were specified on the command line, Emacs simply displays
those files; otherwise, it displays a buffer named @samp{*scratch*},
those files; otherwise, it displays a buffer named @file{*scratch*},
which can be used to evaluate Emacs Lisp expressions interactively.
@xref{Lisp Interaction}. You can set the variable
@code{inhibit-startup-screen} using the Customize facility
......@@ -77,9 +77,13 @@ information about @file{site-start.el}.}
by setting the variable @code{initial-buffer-choice} to a
non-@code{nil} value. (In that case, even if you specify one or more
files on the command line, Emacs opens but does not display them.)
The value of @code{initial-buffer-choice} can be either the name of
the desired file or directory, or @code{t}, which means to display the
@samp{*scratch*} buffer.
The value of @code{initial-buffer-choice} should be the name of
the desired file or directory.
@ignore
@c I do not think this should be mentioned. AFAICS it is just a dodge
@c around inhibit-startup-screen not being settable on a site-wide basis.
or @code{t}, which means to display the @file{*scratch*} buffer.
@end ignore
@node Exiting, Basic, Entering Emacs, Top
@section Exiting Emacs
......
......@@ -976,7 +976,7 @@ are not visiting files are auto-saved only if you request it explicitly;
when they are auto-saved, the auto-save file name is made by appending
@samp{#} to the front and rear of buffer name, then
adding digits and letters at the end for uniqueness. For
example, the @samp{*mail*} buffer in which you compose messages to be
example, the @file{*mail*} buffer in which you compose messages to be
sent might be auto-saved in a file named @file{#*mail*#704juu}. Auto-save file
names are made this way unless you reprogram parts of Emacs to do
something different (the functions @code{make-auto-save-file-name} and
......@@ -1245,7 +1245,7 @@ for more information about using the Trash.
@vindex diff-switches
The command @kbd{M-x diff} prompts for two file names, using the
minibuffer, and displays the differences between the two files in a
buffer named @samp{*diff*}. This works by running the @command{diff}
buffer named @file{*diff*}. This works by running the @command{diff}
program, using options taken from the variable @code{diff-switches}.
The value of @code{diff-switches} should be a string; the default is
@code{"-c"} to specify a context diff. @xref{Top,, Diff, diff,
......
......@@ -257,7 +257,7 @@ highlighting.
@key{RET}, or by clicking either @kbd{Mouse-1} or @kbd{Mouse-2} on the
button. For example, in a Dired buffer, each file name is a button;
activating it causes Emacs to visit that file (@pxref{Dired}). In a
@samp{*Compilation*} buffer, each error message is a button, and
@file{*Compilation*} buffer, each error message is a button, and
activating it visits the source code for that error
(@pxref{Compilation}).
......
......@@ -421,7 +421,7 @@ tell it to. @xref{Bugs}.
The echo area is the bottom line of the screen, used for echoing the
arguments to commands, for asking questions, and showing brief messages
(including error messages). The messages are stored in the buffer
@samp{*Messages*} so you can review them later. @xref{Echo Area}.
@file{*Messages*} so you can review them later. @xref{Echo Area}.
@item Echoing
Echoing is acknowledging the receipt of input events by displaying
......
......@@ -102,7 +102,7 @@ to (@code{describe-key-briefly}). Here @kbd{c} stands for
Display the commands and variables whose documentation matches
@var{topics} (@code{apropos-documentation}).
@item C-h e
Display the @code{*Messages*} buffer
Display the @file{*Messages*} buffer
(@code{view-echo-area-messages}).
@item C-h f @var{function} @key{RET}
Display documentation on the Lisp function named @var{function}
......@@ -168,7 +168,7 @@ programming language you are editing (@code{info-lookup-symbol}).
@item C-h .
Display the help message for a special text area, if point is in one
(@code{display-local-help}). (These include, for example, links in
@samp{*Help*} buffers.)
@file{*Help*} buffers.)
@end table
@node Key Help
......@@ -519,7 +519,7 @@ use @kbd{C-h c} to find out what they do.
@findex view-echo-area-messages
To review recent echo area messages, use @kbd{C-h e}