Commit 38dc51ba authored by Katsumi Yamaoka's avatar Katsumi Yamaoka
Browse files

2009-09-02 Teodor Zlatanov <tzz@lifelogs.com>

* auth.texi (Help for users): Corrected markup.
parent cdce0b33
......@@ -12,6 +12,10 @@
(Feedback): Document the new bug report command.
(Structure editing): Added an index entry for the sorting of subtrees.
2009-09-02 Teodor Zlatanov <tzz@lifelogs.com>
* auth.texi (Help for users): Corrected markup.
2009-09-02 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* emacs-mime.texi (time-date): Mention float-time.
......
......@@ -67,16 +67,9 @@ It is a way for multiple applications to share a single configuration
@node Overview
@chapter Overview
The auth-source library is a modern, extensible, enterprise-class
authentication library. It uses the latest design patterns, has 1800
unit tests, and has been featured in 21 industry conference keynote
talks. It's future-proof, mathematically proven to be bug-free, and
has 6 internal XML parsers just in case you ever need to eat up some
memory.
Just kidding. The auth-source library is simply a way for Emacs and
Gnus, among others, to find the answer to the old burning question ``I
have a server name and a port, what are my user name and password?''
The auth-source library is simply a way for Emacs and Gnus, among
others, to find the answer to the old burning question ``I have a
server name and a port, what are my user name and password?''
The auth-source library actually supports more than just the user name
(known as the login) or the password, but only those two are in use
......@@ -90,25 +83,32 @@ see later in this document.
``Netrc'' files are a de facto standard. They look like this:
@example
machine mymachine login myloginname password mypassword port myport
machine @var{mymachine} login @var{myloginname} password @var{mypassword} port @var{myport}
@end example
The machine is the server (either a DNS name or an IP address).
The port is optional. If it's missing, auth-source will assume any
port is OK. Actually the port is a protocol name or a port number so
you can have separate entries for port 143 and for protocol ``imap''
if you fancy that. Anyway, you can just omit the port if you don't
need it. ``Netrc'' files are usually called @code{.authinfo} or
@code{.netrc}; nowadays @code{.authinfo} seems to be more popular and
the auth-source library encourages this confusion by making it the
default, as you'll see later.
If you have problems with the port, set @var{auth-source-debug} to t
and see what port the library is checking in the @code{*Messages*}
buffer. Ditto for any other problems, your first step is always to
see what's being checked. The second step, of course, is to write a
blog entry about it and wait for the answer in the comments.
You can customize the variable @var{auth-sources}. The following may
you can have separate entries for port @var{143} and for protocol
@var{imap} if you fancy that. Anyway, you can just omit the port if
you don't need it.
The login and password are simply your login credentials to the server.
``Netrc'' files are usually called @code{.authinfo} or @code{.netrc};
nowadays @code{.authinfo} seems to be more popular and the auth-source
library encourages this confusion by making it the default, as you'll
see later.
If you have problems with the port, set @code{auth-source-debug} to
@code{t} and see what port the library is checking in the
@code{*Messages*} buffer. Ditto for any other problems, your first
step is always to see what's being checked. The second step, of
course, is to write a blog entry about it and wait for the answer in
the comments.
You can customize the variable @code{auth-sources}. The following may
be needed if you are using an older version of Emacs or if the
auth-source library is not loaded for some other reason.
......@@ -119,7 +119,7 @@ auth-source library is not loaded for some other reason.
@defvar auth-sources
The @var{auth-sources} variable tells the auth-source library where
The @code{auth-sources} variable tells the auth-source library where
your netrc files live for a particular host and protocol. While you
can get fancy, the default and simplest configuration is:
......@@ -132,7 +132,7 @@ Sweet simplicity. In fact, this is already the default, so unless you
want to move your netrc file, it will just work if you have that
file. You may not, though, so make sure it exists.
By adding multiple entries to @var{auth-sources} with a particular
By adding multiple entries to @code{auth-sources} with a particular
host or protocol, you can have specific netrc files for that host or
protocol. Usually this is unnecessary but may make sense if you have
shared netrc files or some other unusual setup (90% of Emacs users
......@@ -140,7 +140,7 @@ have unusual setups and the remaining 10% are @emph{really} unusual).
@end defvar
If you don't customize @var{auth-sources}, you'll have to live with
If you don't customize @code{auth-sources}, you'll have to live with
the defaults: any host and any port are looked up in the netrc
file @code{~/.authinfo.gpg}. This is an encrypted file if and only if
you set up EPA, which is strongly recommended.
......@@ -198,8 +198,8 @@ The auth-source library only has one function for external use.
@defun auth-source-user-or-password mode host port
Retrieve appropriate authentication tokens, determined by @var{mode},
for host @var{host} and @var{port}. If @var{auth-source-debug} is t,
debugging messages will be printed. Set @var{auth-source-debug} to a
for host @var{host} and @var{port}. If @code{auth-source-debug} is t,
debugging messages will be printed. Set @code{auth-source-debug} to a
function to use that function for logging. The parameters passed will
be the same that the @code{message} function takes, that is, a string
formatting spec and optional parameters.
......
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