Commit 39a9bed3 authored by Chong Yidong's avatar Chong Yidong
Browse files

* keymaps.texi (Key Sequences): Some clarifications.

parent 848a925e
2006-05-25 Chong Yidong <cyd@stupidchicken.com>
* keymaps.texi (Key Sequences): Some clarifications.
2006-05-25 Thien-Thi Nguyen <ttn@gnu.org>
* processes.texi (Bindat Functions): Say "unibyte string"
......
......@@ -82,39 +82,36 @@ and can change when bindings are changed. However, a one-event sequence
is always a key sequence, because it does not depend on any prefix keys
for its well-formedness.
At any time, several primary keymaps are @dfn{active}---that is, in
use for finding key bindings. These are the @dfn{global map}, which is
shared by all buffers; the @dfn{local keymap}, which is usually
associated with a specific major mode; and zero or more @dfn{minor mode
keymaps}, which belong to currently enabled minor modes. (Not all minor
modes have keymaps.) The local keymap bindings shadow (i.e., take
precedence over) the corresponding global bindings. The minor mode
keymaps shadow both local and global keymaps. @xref{Active Keymaps},
for details.
The Emacs Lisp representation for a key sequence is a string or vector.
A key sequence can be represented in Emacs Lisp as either a string
or vector. Unless otherwise stated, any Emacs Lisp function that
accepts a key sequence as an argument can handle both representations.
In the string representation, alphanumeric characters ordinarily
stand for themselves; for example, @code{"a"} represents @key{a} and
and @code{"1"} represents @key{1}. Control character events are
and @code{"2"} represents @key{2}. Control character events are
prefixed by the substring @code{"\C-"}, and meta characters by
@code{"\M-"}; for example, @code{"\C-x"} represents the key @kbd{C-x}.
In addition, the @kbd{<TAB>}, @kbd{<RET>}, @kbd{<ESC>}, and
@kbd{<DEL>} events are represented by @code{"\t"}, @code{"\r"},
@code{"\e"}, and @code{"\d"} respectively. The string representation
of a complete key sequence is then obtained by concatenating the
string representations of each constituent event; thus, @code{"\C-x"}
represents the key sequence @kbd{C-x}.
string representations of each constituent event; thus, @code{"\C-xl"}
represents the key sequence @kbd{C-x l}.
Key sequences containing function keys, mouse button events, or
non-ASCII characters such as @kbd{C-=} or @kbd{H-a} cannot be
represented as strings; they have to be represented as vectors.
represented by strings; they have to be represented by vectors.
In the vector representation, each element of the vector represents
a consecutive input element, in its Lisp form. @xref{Input Events}.
For example, ordinary keyboard events are represented by Lisp
characters (@pxref{Keyboard Events}), so the character @code{?a}
represents @key{a}.
For example, the vector @code{[?\C-x ?l]} represents the key sequence
@kbd{C-x l}.
For examples of key sequences written in string and vector
representations, @ref{Init Rebinding,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}.
The @code{kbd} macro provides a convenient way to generate an Emacs
Lisp key sequence:
@defmac kbd keyseq-text
This macro converts the text @var{keyseq-text} (a string constant)
......@@ -149,6 +146,16 @@ execution by the command loop). Given an event (or an event type) and a
keymap, Emacs can get the event's definition. Events include
characters, function keys, and mouse actions (@pxref{Input Events}).
At any time, several primary keymaps are @dfn{active}---that is, in
use for finding key bindings. These are the @dfn{global map}, which is
shared by all buffers; the @dfn{local keymap}, which is usually
associated with a specific major mode; and zero or more @dfn{minor mode
keymaps}, which belong to currently enabled minor modes. (Not all minor
modes have keymaps.) The local keymap bindings shadow (i.e., take
precedence over) the corresponding global bindings. The minor mode
keymaps shadow both local and global keymaps. @xref{Active Keymaps},
for details.
Each keymap is a list whose @sc{car} is the symbol @code{keymap}. The
remaining elements of the list define the key bindings of the keymap.
A symbol whose function definition is a keymap is also a keymap. Use
......
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