Commit 3b6de082 authored by Chong Yidong's avatar Chong Yidong
Browse files

* frames.texi (Speedbar): Add information on keybindings,

	dismissing the speedbar, and buffer display mode.  Link to
	speedbar manual.
parent 4b9f0de2
2005-10-09 Chong Yidong <cyd@stupidchicken.com>
* frames.texi (Speedbar): Add information on keybindings,
dismissing the speedbar, and buffer display mode. Link to
speedbar manual.
2005-10-09 Jan Dj,Ad(Brv <jan.h.d@swipnet.se>
* cmdargs.texi (Icons X): Removed options -i, -itype, --icon-type,
......
......@@ -548,23 +548,44 @@ the variable should be @code{nil}.
@section Making and Using a Speedbar Frame
@cindex speedbar
An Emacs frame can have a @dfn{speedbar}, which is a vertical window
that serves as a scrollable menu of files you could visit and tags
within those files. To create a speedbar, type @kbd{M-x speedbar}; this
creates a speedbar window for the selected frame. From then on, you can
click on a file name in the speedbar to visit that file in the
corresponding Emacs frame, or click on a tag name to jump to that tag in
the Emacs frame.
Initially the speedbar lists the immediate contents of the current
directory, one file per line. Each line also has a box, @samp{[+]} or
@samp{<+>}, that you can click on with @kbd{Mouse-2} to ``open up'' the
contents of that item. If the line names a directory, opening it adds
The @dfn{Speedbar} is a special frame that is used to summarize
information related to other buffers. Normally, it displays a menu of
files you could visit and tags within those files. Type @kbd{M-x
speedbar} to enable the speedbar and associate it with the current
frame (which is called the speedbar's @dfn{attached frame}).
Currently, only one speedbar is supported at a time. To dismiss the
speedbar, select it and type @kbd{q} or @kbd{M-x speedbar}, or delete
the frame or window normally. You can then attach the speedbar to a
different frame by calling @kbd{M-x speedbar} from that frame.
When you initially launch the speedbar, it starts in @dfn{File
Display Mode}, showing the current directory of the selected window of
the attached frame, one file per line. Clicking on a file name visits
that file in the attached frame, and clicking on a directory name
shows that directory in the speedbar (@pxref{Mouse References}). Each
line also has a box, @samp{[+]} or @samp{<+>}, that you can click on
to @dfn{expand} the contents of that item. Expanding a directory adds
the contents of that directory to the speedbar display, underneath the
directory's own line. If the line lists an ordinary file, opening it up
adds a list of the tags in that file to the speedbar display. When a
file is opened up, the @samp{[+]} changes to @samp{[-]}; you can click
on that box to ``close up'' that file (hide its contents).
directory's own line. Expanding an ordinary file adds a list of the
tags in that file to the speedbar display; you can click on a tag name
to jump to that tag in the attached frame. When a file or directory
is expanded, the @samp{[+]} changes to @samp{[-]}; you can click on
that box to @dfn{contract} the item, hiding its contents.
You can also use the keyboard to navigate the speedbar. Typing
@kbd{RET} is equivalent to clicking the item on the current line, and
@kbd{SPC} expands or contracts the item. @kbd{U} displays the parent
directory of the current directory. To copy, delete, or rename the
file on the current line, type @kbd{C}, @kbd{D}, and @kbd{R}
respectively. To create a new directory, type @kbd{M}.
The speedbar is not limited to showing files. Type @kbd{b} to enter
@dfn{Buffer Display Mode}, in which the speedbar displays a list of
Emacs buffers. To return to File Display Mode, type @kbd{f}. You can
also change the display mode by clicking @kbd{mouse-3} anywhere in the
speedbar window (or @kbd{mouse-1} on the mode-line) and selecting
@samp{Displays} in the pop-up menu.
Some major modes, including Rmail mode, Info, and GUD, have
specialized ways of putting useful items into the speedbar for you to
......@@ -572,10 +593,8 @@ select. For example, in Rmail mode, the speedbar shows a list of Rmail
files, and lets you move the current message to another Rmail file by
clicking on its @samp{<M>} box.
A speedbar belongs to one Emacs frame, and always operates on that
frame. If you use multiple frames, you can make a speedbar for some or
all of the frames; type @kbd{M-x speedbar} in any given frame to make a
speedbar for it.
For more details on using and programming the speedbar, @xref{Top,
Speedbar,,speedbar, Speedbar Manual}.
@node Multiple Displays
@section Multiple Displays
......
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