Commit 3c93d00f authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris

Markup fixes for auth.texi

* doc/misc/auth.texi (Help for users, Help for developers)
(GnuPG and EasyPG Assistant Configuration): Markup fixes.
parent aebd5f1a
......@@ -2,6 +2,8 @@
* auth.texi (Secret Service API): Copyedits.
(Help for developers): Fill in some missing function doc-strings.
(Help for users, Help for developers)
(GnuPG and EasyPG Assistant Configuration): Markup fixes.
2012-04-04 Michael Albinus <michael.albinus@gmx.de>
......
......@@ -113,7 +113,7 @@ The @code{user} is the user name. It's known as @var{:user} in
Spaces are always OK as far as auth-source is concerned (but other
programs may not like them). Just put the data in quotes, escaping
quotes as you'd expect with @code{\}.
quotes as you'd expect with @samp{\}.
All these are optional. You could just say (but we don't recommend
it, we're just showing that it's possible)
......@@ -125,14 +125,14 @@ password @var{mypassword}
to use the same password everywhere. Again, @emph{DO NOT DO THIS} or
you will be pwned as the kids say.
``Netrc'' files are usually called @code{.authinfo} or @code{.netrc};
nowadays @code{.authinfo} seems to be more popular and the auth-source
``Netrc'' files are usually called @file{.authinfo} or @file{.netrc};
nowadays @file{.authinfo} seems to be more popular and the auth-source
library encourages this confusion by accepting both, as you'll see
later.
If you have problems with the search, set @code{auth-source-debug} to
@code{'trivia} and see what host, port, and user the library is
checking in the @code{*Messages*} buffer. Ditto for any other
checking in the @samp{*Messages*} buffer. Ditto for any other
problems, your first step is always to see what's being checked. The
second step, of course, is to write a blog entry about it and wait for
the answer in the comments.
......@@ -181,11 +181,11 @@ Here's a mixed example using two sources:
If you don't customize @code{auth-sources}, you'll have to live with
the defaults: any host and any port are looked up in the netrc
file @code{~/.authinfo.gpg}, which is a GnuPG encrypted file
file @file{~/.authinfo.gpg}, which is a GnuPG encrypted file
(@pxref{GnuPG and EasyPG Assistant Configuration}).
If that fails, the unencrypted netrc files @code{~/.authinfo} and
@code{~/.netrc} will be used.
If that fails, the unencrypted netrc files @file{~/.authinfo} and
@file{~/.netrc} will be used.
The typical netrc line example is without a port.
......@@ -363,9 +363,9 @@ Search items in @var{collection} with @var{attributes}.
The auth-source library lets you control logging output easily.
@defvar auth-source-debug
Set this variable to 'trivia to see lots of output in *Messages*, or
set it to a function that behaves like @code{message} to do your own
logging.
Set this variable to @code{'trivia} to see lots of output in
@samp{*Messages*}, or set it to a function that behaves like
@code{message} to do your own logging.
@end defvar
The auth-source library only has a few functions for external use.
......@@ -453,12 +453,12 @@ It returns the number of items forgotten.
@appendix GnuPG and EasyPG Assistant Configuration
If you don't customize @code{auth-sources}, the auth-source library
reads @code{~/.authinfo.gpg}, which is a GnuPG encrypted file. Then
it will check @code{~/.authinfo} but it's not recommended to use such
reads @file{~/.authinfo.gpg}, which is a GnuPG encrypted file. Then
it will check @file{~/.authinfo} but it's not recommended to use such
an unencrypted file.
In Emacs 23 or later there is an option @code{auto-encryption-mode} to
automatically decrypt @code{*.gpg} files. It is enabled by default.
automatically decrypt @file{*.gpg} files. It is enabled by default.
If you are using earlier versions of Emacs, you will need:
@lisp
......
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