Commit 3dc62b2b authored by Chong Yidong's avatar Chong Yidong
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Corrections and tweaks to Help chapter in Emacs manual.

* doc/emacs/help.texi (Help, Help Summary): Eliminate the unnecessary "help
option" terminology.
(Key Help): Add command names.  Define "documentation string".
(Name Help): Remove an over-long joke.
(Apropos): Document prefix args.  Remove duplicated descriptions.
(Help Mode): Add C-c C-b to table.  Update TAB binding.
(Package Keywords): Rename from "Library by Keyword".  Describe
new package menu interface.
(Help Files, Help Echo): Tweak description.

* doc/emacs/mini.texi: Various copyedits.
parent e3b10342
2011-10-08 Chong Yidong <cyd@stupidchicken.com>
2011-10-09 Chong Yidong <cyd@stupidchicken.com>
* help.texi (Help, Help Summary): Eliminate the unnecessary "help
option" terminology.
(Key Help): Add command names. Define "documentation string".
(Name Help): Remove an over-long joke.
(Apropos): Document prefix args. Remove duplicated descriptions.
(Help Mode): Add C-c C-b to table. Update TAB binding.
(Package Keywords): Rename from "Library by Keyword". Describe
new package menu interface.
(Help Files, Help Echo): Tweak description.
* mini.texi (Completion Options): Add completion-cycle-threshold.
(Minibuffer History): Document numeric args to history commands.
2011-10-08 Eli Zaretskii <eliz@gnu.org>
......
......@@ -292,10 +292,10 @@ Help
* Name Help:: Asking about a command, variable or function name.
* Apropos:: Asking what pertains to a given topic.
* Help Mode:: Special features of Help mode and Help buffers.
* Library Keywords:: Finding Lisp libraries by keywords (topics).
* Package Keywords:: Finding Lisp libraries by keywords (topics).
* Language Help:: Help relating to international language support.
* Misc Help:: Other help commands.
* Help Files:: Commands to display pre-written help files.
* Help Files:: Commands to display auxilliary help files.
* Help Echo:: Help on active text and tooltips (`balloon help').
The Mark and the Region
......
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......@@ -541,64 +541,60 @@ Move to a later item in the minibuffer history that matches
@kindex M-p @r{(minibuffer history)}
@kindex M-n @r{(minibuffer history)}
@kindex UP @r{(minibuffer history)}
@kindex DOWN @r{(minibuffer history)}
@findex next-history-element
@findex previous-history-element
While in the minibuffer, typing @kbd{M-p} or @key{Up}
(@code{previous-history-element}) moves up through the minibuffer
history list, one item at a time. Each @kbd{M-p} fetches an earlier
item from the history list into the minibuffer, replacing its existing
contents. Similarly, typing @kbd{M-n} or @key{Down}
(@code{next-history-element}) moves back down the history list,
fetching later entries into the minibuffer. You can think of these
commands as ``backwards'' and ``forwards'' through the history list.
While in the minibuffer, @kbd{M-p} or @key{Up}
(@code{previous-history-element}) moves through the minibuffer history
list, one item at a time. Each @kbd{M-p} fetches an earlier item from
the history list into the minibuffer, replacing its existing contents.
Typing @kbd{M-n} or @key{Down} (@code{next-history-element}) moves
through the minibuffer history list in the opposite direction,
fetching later entries into the minibuffer.
If you type @kbd{M-n} in the minibuffer when there are no later
entries in the minibuffer history (e.g., if you haven't previously
typed @kbd{M-p}), Emacs tries fetching from a list of default
argument: values that you are likely to enter. You can think of this
as moving through the ``future list'' instead of the ``history list''.
arguments: values that you are likely to enter. You can think of this
as moving through the ``future history'' list.
The input that @kbd{M-p} or @kbd{M-n} fetches into the minibuffer
entirely replaces the existing contents of the minibuffer, so you can
simply type @key{RET} to use it as an argument. You can also edit the
text before you reuse it; this does not change the history element
that you ``moved'' to, but your new argument does go at the end of the
history list in its own right.
If you edit the text inserted by the @kbd{M-p} or @key{M-n}
minibuffer history commands, this does not change its entry in the
history list. However, the edited argument does go at the end of the
history list when you submit it.
@findex previous-matching-history-element
@findex next-matching-history-element
@kindex M-r @r{(minibuffer history)}
@kindex M-s @r{(minibuffer history)}
There are also commands to search forward or backward through the
history; they search for history elements that match a regular
expression. @kbd{M-r} (@code{previous-matching-history-element})
searches older elements in the history, while @kbd{M-s}
(@code{next-matching-history-element}) searches newer elements. These
commands are unusual: they use the minibuffer to read the regular
expression even though they are invoked from the minibuffer. As with
incremental searching, an upper-case letter in the regular expression
makes the search case-sensitive (@pxref{Search Case}). You can also
search through the history using an incremental search (@pxref{Isearch
Minibuffer}).
All uses of the minibuffer record your input on a history list, but
there are separate history lists for different kinds of arguments.
For example, there is a list for file names, used by all the commands
that read file names. (As a special feature, this history list
records the absolute file name, even if the name you entered was not
absolute.)
There are several other specific history lists, including one for
buffer names, one for arguments of commands like @code{query-replace},
one used by @kbd{M-x} for command names, and one used by
@code{compile} for compilation commands. Finally, there is one
``miscellaneous'' history list that most minibuffer arguments use.
You can use @kbd{M-r} (@code{previous-matching-history-element}) to
search through older elements in the history list, and @kbd{M-s}
(@code{next-matching-history-element}) to search through newer
entries. Each of these commands asks for a @dfn{regular expression}
as an argument, and fetches the first matching entry into the
minibuffer. @xref{Regexps}, for an explanation of regular
expressions. A numeric prefix argument @var{n} means to fetch the
@var{n}th matching entry. These commands are unusual, in that they
use the minibuffer to read the regular expression argument, even
though they are invoked from the minibuffer. An upper-case letter in
the regular expression makes the search case-sensitive (@pxref{Search
Case}).
You can also search through the history using an incremental search.
@xref{Isearch Minibuffer}.
Emacs keeps separate history lists for several different kinds of
arguments. For example, there is a list for file names, used by all
the commands that read file names. Other history lists include buffer
names, command names (used by @kbd{M-x}), and command arguments (used
by commands like @code{query-replace}).
@vindex history-length
The variable @code{history-length} specifies the maximum length of a
minibuffer history list; adding a new element deletes the oldest
element if the list gets too long. If the value of
@code{history-length} is @code{t}, there is no maximum length.
element if the list gets too long. If the value is @code{t}, there is
no maximum length.
@vindex history-delete-duplicates
The variable @code{history-delete-duplicates} specifies whether to
......@@ -629,27 +625,25 @@ Display the entire command history, showing all the commands
@kindex C-x ESC ESC
@findex repeat-complex-command
@kbd{C-x @key{ESC} @key{ESC}} is used to re-execute a recent command
that used the minibuffer. With no argument, it repeats the last such
command. A numeric argument specifies which command to repeat; 1
means the last one, 2 the previous, and so on.
@kbd{C-x @key{ESC} @key{ESC}} re-executes a recent command that used
the minibuffer. With no argument, it repeats the last such command.
A numeric argument specifies which command to repeat; 1 means the last
one, 2 the previous, and so on.
@kbd{C-x @key{ESC} @key{ESC}} works by turning the previous command
into a Lisp expression and then entering a minibuffer initialized with
the text for that expression. Even if you don't understand Lisp
syntax, it will probably be obvious which command is displayed for
repetition. If you type just @key{RET}, that repeats the command
unchanged. You can also change the command by editing the Lisp
expression before you execute it. The repeated command is added to
the front of the command history unless it is identical to the most
recent item.
Once inside the minibuffer for @kbd{C-x @key{ESC} @key{ESC}}, you can
use the minibuffer history commands (@kbd{M-p}, @kbd{M-n}, @kbd{M-r},
@kbd{M-s}; @pxref{Minibuffer History}) to move through the history list
of saved entire commands. After finding the desired previous command,
you can edit its expression as usual and then repeat it by typing
@key{RET}.
the text for that expression. Even if you don't know Lisp, it will
probably be obvious which command is displayed for repetition. If you
type just @key{RET}, that repeats the command unchanged. You can also
change the command by editing the Lisp expression before you execute
it. The repeated command is added to the front of the command history
unless it is identical to the most recent item.
Once inside the minibuffer for @kbd{C-x @key{ESC} @key{ESC}}, you
can use the usual minibuffer history commands (@pxref{Minibuffer
History}) to move through the history list. After finding the desired
previous command, you can edit its expression as usual and then repeat
it by typing @key{RET}.
@vindex isearch-resume-in-command-history
Incremental search does not, strictly speaking, use the minibuffer.
......@@ -674,12 +668,11 @@ when you tell Emacs to visit a file on another machine via a network
protocol such as FTP, you often need to supply a password to gain
access to the machine (@pxref{Remote Files}).
Entering a password is, in a basic sense, similar to using a
minibuffer. Emacs displays a prompt in the echo area (such as
@samp{Password: }); after you type the required password, press
@key{RET} to submit it. To prevent others from seeing your password,
every character you type is displayed as a dot (@samp{.}) instead of
its usual form.
Entering a password is similar to using a minibuffer. Emacs
displays a prompt in the echo area (such as @samp{Password: }); after
you type the required password, press @key{RET} to submit it. To
prevent others from seeing your password, every character you type is
displayed as a dot (@samp{.}) instead of its usual form.
Most of the features and commands associated with the minibuffer can
@emph{not} be used when entering a password. There is no history or
......
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