Commit 3f63de1e authored by Karl Heuer's avatar Karl Heuer
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*** empty log message ***

parent e7029763
......@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@
@cindex control structures
A Lisp program consists of expressions or @dfn{forms} (@pxref{Forms}).
We control the order of execution of the forms by enclosing them in
We control the order of execution of these forms by enclosing them in
@dfn{control structures}. Control structures are special forms which
control when, whether, or how many times to execute the forms they
contain.
......@@ -59,7 +59,7 @@ control construct of Lisp.
@end example
@noindent
and it says to execute the forms @var{a}, @var{b}, @var{c} and so on, in
and it says to execute the forms @var{a}, @var{b}, @var{c}, and so on, in
that order. These forms are called the body of the @code{progn} form.
The value of the last form in the body becomes the value of the entire
@code{progn}.
......@@ -556,8 +556,8 @@ The return point is distinguished from other such return points by
@var{tag} is evaluated normally before the return point is established.
With the return point in effect, @code{catch} evaluates the forms of the
@var{body} in textual order. If the forms execute normally, without
error or nonlocal exit, the value of the last body form is returned from
@var{body} in textual order. If the forms execute normally (without
error or nonlocal exit) the value of the last body form is returned from
the @code{catch}.
If a @code{throw} is done within @var{body} specifying the same value
......@@ -702,7 +702,7 @@ instead. @xref{Catch and Throw}.
Most errors are signaled ``automatically'' within Lisp primitives
which you call for other purposes, such as if you try to take the
@sc{car} of an integer or move forward a character at the end of the
buffer; you can also signal errors explicitly with the functions
buffer. You can also signal errors explicitly with the functions
@code{error} and @code{signal}.
Quitting, which happens when the user types @kbd{C-g}, is not
......
......@@ -699,7 +699,7 @@ simple mirror images. @code{re-search-forward} finds the match whose
beginning is as close as possible to the starting point. If
@code{re-search-backward} were a perfect mirror image, it would find the
match whose end is as close as possible. However, in fact it finds the
match whose beginning is as close as possible. The reason is that
match whose beginning is as close as possible. The reason for this is that
matching a regular expression at a given spot always works from
beginning to end, and starts at a specified beginning position.
......@@ -988,7 +988,7 @@ Display some help, then ask again.
@section The Match Data
@cindex match data
Emacs keeps track of the positions of the start and end of segments of
Emacs keeps track of the start and end positions of the segments of
text found during a regular expression search. This means, for example,
that you can search for a complex pattern, such as a date in an Rmail
message, and then extract parts of the match under control of the
......
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