Commit 3f7fab24 authored by Luc Teirlinck's avatar Luc Teirlinck
Browse files

Fix typos.

(Bindat Spec): Correct Texinfo error.
parent f19b57e3
2005-06-17 Luc Teirlinck <teirllm@auburn.edu>
* processes.texi: Fix typos.
(Bindat Spec): Correct Texinfo error.
2005-06-17 Thien-Thi Nguyen <ttn@gnu.org> 2005-06-17 Thien-Thi Nguyen <ttn@gnu.org>
* lists.texi (Rings): New node. * lists.texi (Rings): New node.
......
...@@ -767,9 +767,9 @@ specify the process to send input to, and the input data to send. The ...@@ -767,9 +767,9 @@ specify the process to send input to, and the input data to send. The
data appears on the ``standard input'' of the subprocess. data appears on the ``standard input'' of the subprocess.
Some operating systems have limited space for buffered input in a Some operating systems have limited space for buffered input in a
@acronym{PTY}. On these systems, Emacs sends an @acronym{EOF} periodically amidst @acronym{PTY}. On these systems, Emacs sends an @acronym{EOF}
the other characters, to force them through. For most programs, periodically amidst the other characters, to force them through. For
these @acronym{EOF}s do no harm. most programs, these @acronym{EOF}s do no harm.
Subprocess input is normally encoded using a coding system before the Subprocess input is normally encoded using a coding system before the
subprocess receives it, much like text written into a file. You can use subprocess receives it, much like text written into a file. You can use
...@@ -973,7 +973,7 @@ primitive that waits. ...@@ -973,7 +973,7 @@ primitive that waits.
@defvar process-adaptive-read-buffering @defvar process-adaptive-read-buffering
On some systems, when Emacs reads the output from a subprocess, the On some systems, when Emacs reads the output from a subprocess, the
output data is read in very small blocks, potentially resulting in output data is read in very small blocks, potentially resulting in
very poor performance. This behaviour can be remedied to some extent very poor performance. This behavior can be remedied to some extent
by setting the variable @var{process-adaptive-read-buffering} to a by setting the variable @var{process-adaptive-read-buffering} to a
non-@code{nil} value (the default), as it will automatically delay reading non-@code{nil} value (the default), as it will automatically delay reading
from such processes, thus allowing them to produce more output before from such processes, thus allowing them to produce more output before
...@@ -1560,7 +1560,7 @@ back to listening for more connection requests. ...@@ -1560,7 +1560,7 @@ back to listening for more connection requests.
keyword/argument pairs, for example @code{:server t} to create a keyword/argument pairs, for example @code{:server t} to create a
server process, or @code{:type 'datagram} to create a datagram server process, or @code{:type 'datagram} to create a datagram
connection. @xref{Low-Level Network}, for details. You can also use connection. @xref{Low-Level Network}, for details. You can also use
the @code{open-network-stream} function descibed below. the @code{open-network-stream} function described below.
You can distinguish process objects representing network connections You can distinguish process objects representing network connections
and servers from those representing subprocesses with the and servers from those representing subprocesses with the
...@@ -1824,7 +1824,8 @@ If you don't specify this keyword at all, the default ...@@ -1824,7 +1824,8 @@ If you don't specify this keyword at all, the default
is to determine the coding systems from the data. is to determine the coding systems from the data.
@item :noquery @var{query-flag} @item :noquery @var{query-flag}
Initialize the process query flag to @var{query-flag}. @xref{Query Before Exit}. Initialize the process query flag to @var{query-flag}.
@xref{Query Before Exit}.
@item :filter @var{filter} @item :filter @var{filter}
Initialize the process filter to @var{filter}. Initialize the process filter to @var{filter}.
...@@ -1939,7 +1940,8 @@ and @var{remote-address} arguments to @code{make-network-process}. ...@@ -1939,7 +1940,8 @@ and @var{remote-address} arguments to @code{make-network-process}.
@defun network-interface-info ifname @defun network-interface-info ifname
This function returns information about the network interface named This function returns information about the network interface named
@var{ifname}. The value is a list of the form @code{(@var{addr} @var{bcast} @var{netmask} @var{hwaddr} @var{flags})}. @var{ifname}. The value is a list of the form
@code{(@var{addr} @var{bcast} @var{netmask} @var{hwaddr} @var{flags})}.
@table @var @table @var
@item addr @item addr
...@@ -2020,7 +2022,7 @@ That particular network option is supported by ...@@ -2020,7 +2022,7 @@ That particular network option is supported by
@section Packing and Unpacking Byte Arrays @section Packing and Unpacking Byte Arrays
This section describes how to pack and unpack arrays of bytes, This section describes how to pack and unpack arrays of bytes,
usually for binary network protocols. These functoins byte arrays to usually for binary network protocols. These functions byte arrays to
alists, and vice versa. The byte array can be represented as a alists, and vice versa. The byte array can be represented as a
unibyte string or as a vector of integers, while the alist associates unibyte string or as a vector of integers, while the alist associates
symbols either with fixed-size objects or with recursive sub-alists. symbols either with fixed-size objects or with recursive sub-alists.
...@@ -2053,7 +2055,7 @@ processed, and how to pack or unpack it. ...@@ -2053,7 +2055,7 @@ processed, and how to pack or unpack it.
@cindex network byte ordering @cindex network byte ordering
A field's @dfn{type} describes the size (in bytes) of the object A field's @dfn{type} describes the size (in bytes) of the object
that the field represents and, in the case of multibyte fields, how that the field represents and, in the case of multibyte fields, how
the bytes are ordered within the firld. The two possible orderings the bytes are ordered within the field. The two possible orderings
are ``big endian'' (also known as ``network byte ordering'') and are ``big endian'' (also known as ``network byte ordering'') and
``little endian''. For instance, the number @code{#x23cd} (decimal ``little endian''. For instance, the number @code{#x23cd} (decimal
9165) in big endian would be the two bytes @code{#x23} @code{#xcd}; 9165) in big endian would be the two bytes @code{#x23} @code{#xcd};
...@@ -2100,7 +2102,7 @@ Four-byte vector representing an Internet address. For example: ...@@ -2100,7 +2102,7 @@ Four-byte vector representing an Internet address. For example:
@item bits @var{len} @item bits @var{len}
List of set bits in @var{len} bytes. The bytes are taken in big List of set bits in @var{len} bytes. The bytes are taken in big
endian order and the bits are numbered starting with @code{8 * endian order and the bits are numbered starting with @code{8 *
@var{len} @minus{} 1}} and ending with zero. For example: @code{bits @var{len} @minus{} 1} and ending with zero. For example: @code{bits
2} unpacks @code{#x28} @code{#x1c} to @code{(2 3 4 11 13)} and 2} unpacks @code{#x28} @code{#x1c} to @code{(2 3 4 11 13)} and
@code{#x1c} @code{#x28} to @code{(3 5 10 11 12)}. @code{#x1c} @code{#x28} to @code{(3 5 10 11 12)}.
...@@ -2153,7 +2155,7 @@ they are ignored. ...@@ -2153,7 +2155,7 @@ they are ignored.
Skip to the next multiple of @var{len} bytes. Skip to the next multiple of @var{len} bytes.
@item struct @var{spec-name} @item struct @var{spec-name}
Process @var{spec-name} as a sub-specification. This descrobes a Process @var{spec-name} as a sub-specification. This describes a
structure nested within another structure. structure nested within another structure.
@item union @var{form} (@var{tag} @var{spec})@dots{} @item union @var{form} (@var{tag} @var{spec})@dots{}
...@@ -2223,11 +2225,11 @@ to @var{spec}. ...@@ -2223,11 +2225,11 @@ to @var{spec}.
This function returns a byte array packed according to @var{spec} from This function returns a byte array packed according to @var{spec} from
the data in the alist @var{struct}. Normally it creates and fills a the data in the alist @var{struct}. Normally it creates and fills a
new byte array starting at the beginning. However, if @var{raw-data} new byte array starting at the beginning. However, if @var{raw-data}
is non-@code{nil}, it speciries a pre-allocated string or vector to is non-@code{nil}, it specifies a pre-allocated string or vector to
pack into. If @var{pos} is non-@code{nil}, it specifies the starting pack into. If @var{pos} is non-@code{nil}, it specifies the starting
offset for packing into @code{raw-data}. offset for packing into @code{raw-data}.
@c ??? Isn't this a bug? Shoudn't it always be unibyte? @c ??? Isn't this a bug? Shouldn't it always be unibyte?
Note: The result is a multibyte string; use @code{string-make-unibyte} Note: The result is a multibyte string; use @code{string-make-unibyte}
on it to make it unibyte if necessary. on it to make it unibyte if necessary.
@end defun @end defun
...@@ -2340,7 +2342,7 @@ struct data @{ ...@@ -2340,7 +2342,7 @@ struct data @{
unsigned char type; unsigned char type;
unsigned char opcode; unsigned char opcode;
unsigned long length; /* In little endian order */ unsigned long length; /* In little endian order */
unsigned char id[8]; /* nul-terminated string */ unsigned char id[8]; /* null-terminated string */
unsigned char data[/* (length + 3) & ~3 */]; unsigned char data[/* (length + 3) & ~3 */];
@}; @};
......
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