Commit 41278b77 authored by Paul Eggert's avatar Paul Eggert
Browse files

Spacing and punctuation fixes

parent 7ec63a3a
......@@ -204,7 +204,7 @@ for Korean Hanja.
@item
Andrew Choi and Yamamoto Mitsuharu wrote the Carbon support, used
prior to Emacs 23 for Mac OS. Yamamoto Mitsuharu continued to
prior to Emacs 23 for Mac OS@. Yamamoto Mitsuharu continued to
contribute to Mac OS support in the newer Nextstep port; and also
improved support for multi-monitor displays.
......
......@@ -642,7 +642,7 @@ the directory names in reverse order, so that @file{/top/middle/file}
becomes @samp{file\middle\top}, while @code{post-forward} puts them in
forward order after the file name, as in @samp{file|top/middle}. If
@code{uniquify-buffer-name-style} is set to @code{nil}, the buffer
names simply get @samp{<2>}, @samp{<3>}, etc. appended.
names simply get @samp{<2>}, @samp{<3>}, etc.@: appended.
Which rule to follow for putting the directory names in the buffer
name is not very important if you are going to @emph{look} at the
......
......@@ -138,7 +138,7 @@ instructs the scrolling commands not to fontify (@pxref{Font Lock})
any unfontified text they scroll over, instead to assume it has the
default face. This can cause Emacs to scroll to somewhat wrong buffer
positions when the faces in use are not all the same size, even with
single (i.e. without auto-repeat) scrolling operations.
single (i.e., without auto-repeat) scrolling operations.
@vindex scroll-up
@vindex scroll-down
......
......@@ -955,7 +955,7 @@ bar width, change the @code{scroll-bar-width} frame parameter
@cindex overscrolling
If you're using Emacs on X (with GTK+ or Motif), you can customize the
variable @code{scroll-bar-adjust-thumb-portion} to control
@dfn{overscrolling} of the scroll bar, i.e. dragging the thumb down even
@dfn{overscrolling} of the scroll bar, i.e., dragging the thumb down even
when the end of the buffer is visible. If its value is
non-@code{nil}, the scroll bar can be dragged downwards even if the
end of the buffer is shown; if @code{nil}, the thumb will be at the
......
......@@ -848,7 +848,7 @@ shifting the original text to the right.
The command @kbd{C-x @key{SPC}} (@code{rectangle-mark-mode}) toggles
whether the region-rectangle or the standard region is highlighted
(first activating the region if necessary). When this mode is enabled,
commands that resize the region (@kbd{C-f}, @kbd{C-n} etc.) do
commands that resize the region (@kbd{C-f}, @kbd{C-n} etc.)@: do
so in a rectangular fashion, and killing and yanking operate on the
rectangle. @xref{Killing}. The mode persists only as long as the
region is active.
......
......@@ -266,7 +266,7 @@ for more information about the language environment @var{lang-env}.
Supported language environments include:
@c @cindex entries below are split between portions of the list to
@c make them more accurate, i.e. land on the line that mentions the
@c make them more accurate, i.e., land on the line that mentions the
@c language. However, makeinfo 4.x doesn't fill inside @quotation
@c lines that follow a @cindex entry and whose text has no whitespace.
@c To work around, we group the language environments together, so
......
......@@ -342,7 +342,7 @@ Here, @var{backtrace} is the name of a text file containing a copy of
the backtrace, @var{bindir} is the name of the directory that
contains the Emacs executable, and @var{emacs-binary} is the name of
the Emacs executable file, normally @file{emacs} on GNU and Unix
systems and @file{emacs.exe} on MS-Windows and MS-DOS. Omit the
systems and @file{emacs.exe} on MS-Windows and MS-DOS@. Omit the
@option{-p} option if your version of @command{addr2line} is too old
to have it.
......@@ -1142,7 +1142,7 @@ making diffs of C code. This shows the name of the function that each
change occurs in.
If you are using the Emacs repository, make sure your copy is
up-to-date (e.g. with @code{git pull}). You can commit your changes
up-to-date (e.g., with @code{git pull}). You can commit your changes
to a private branch and generate a patch from the master version by
using @code{git format-patch master}. Or you can leave your changes
uncommitted and use @code{git diff}.
......@@ -1173,7 +1173,7 @@ explanation in comments in the code. It will be more useful there.
Please look at the change log entries of recent commits to see what
sorts of information to put in, and to learn the style that we use. Note that,
unlike some other projects, we do require change logs for
documentation, i.e. Texinfo files.
documentation, i.e., Texinfo files.
@xref{Change Log},
@ifset WWW_GNU_ORG
see
......@@ -1389,7 +1389,7 @@ user freedom and to defend the rights of all free software users.
For general information, see the website @url{http://www.fsf.org/}.
Generally speaking, for non-trivial contributions to GNU Emacs we
require that the copyright be assigned to the FSF. For the reasons
require that the copyright be assigned to the FSF@. For the reasons
behind this, see @url{http://www.gnu.org/licenses/why-assign.html}.
Copyright assignment is a simple process. Residents of some countries
......@@ -1408,7 +1408,7 @@ is not enough). Also, a disclaimer cannot be applied to future work, it
has to be repeated each time you want to send something new.
We can accept small changes (roughly, fewer than 15 lines) without
an assignment. This is a cumulative limit (e.g. three separate 5 line
an assignment. This is a cumulative limit (e.g., three separate 5 line
patches) over all your contributions.
@node Service
......
......@@ -387,7 +387,7 @@ Truth and Falsehood in Emacs Lisp
* Point and mark:: A review of various locations.
* Template for save-excursion::
 
A Few Buffer--Related Functions
A Few Buffer-Related Functions
 
* Finding More:: How to find more information.
* simplified-beginning-of-buffer:: Shows @code{goto-char},
......@@ -4547,7 +4547,7 @@ and if so, prints an appropriate message.
@end itemize
 
@node Buffer Walk Through
@chapter A Few Buffer--Related Functions
@chapter A Few Buffer-Related Functions
 
In this chapter we study in detail several of the functions used in GNU
Emacs. This is called a ``walk-through''. These functions are used as
......@@ -12114,7 +12114,7 @@ Internet, see
@uref{http://www.gnu.org/software/texinfo/manual/texinfo/}
@end ifhtml
@iftex
``Indicating Definitions, Commands, etc.'' in @cite{Texinfo, The GNU
``Indicating Definitions, Commands, etc.''@: in @cite{Texinfo, The GNU
Documentation Format}.
@end iftex
@end itemize
......
......@@ -132,7 +132,7 @@ byte compiler to warn if the command is called from Lisp. The output
of @code{describe-function} will include similar information.
The value of the property can be: a string, which the byte-compiler
will use directly in its warning (it should end with a period, and not
start with a capital, e.g. ``use @dots{} instead.''); @code{t}; any
start with a capital, e.g., ``use @dots{} instead.''); @code{t}; any
other symbol, which should be an alternative function to use in Lisp
code.
......@@ -1043,8 +1043,8 @@ the current Emacs session. If a symbol has not yet been so used,
@end defun
@menu
* Keyboard Events:: Ordinary characters--keys with symbols on them.
* Function Keys:: Function keys--keys with names, not symbols.
* Keyboard Events:: Ordinary characters -- keys with symbols on them.
* Function Keys:: Function keys -- keys with names, not symbols.
* Mouse Events:: Overview of mouse events.
* Click Events:: Pushing and releasing a mouse button.
* Drag Events:: Moving the mouse before releasing the button.
......
......@@ -2154,7 +2154,7 @@ stipple patterns.
Alternative foreground color, a string. This is like @code{:foreground}
but the color is only used as a foreground when the background color is
near to the foreground that would have been used. This is useful for
example when marking text (i.e. the region face). If the text has a foreground
example when marking text (i.e., the region face). If the text has a foreground
that is visible with the region face, that foreground is used.
If the foreground is near the region face background,
@code{:distant-foreground} is used instead so the text is readable.
......
......@@ -753,8 +753,8 @@ Defining Commands
Input Events
* Keyboard Events:: Ordinary characters--keys with symbols on them.
* Function Keys:: Function keys--keys with names, not symbols.
* Keyboard Events:: Ordinary characters -- keys with symbols on them.
* Function Keys:: Function keys -- keys with names, not symbols.
* Mouse Events:: Overview of mouse events.
* Click Events:: Pushing and releasing a mouse button.
* Drag Events:: Moving the mouse before releasing the button.
......
......@@ -360,7 +360,7 @@ coordinates might be negative.
Position of the top-left corner and size of the work area (``usable''
space) in pixels as @samp{(@var{x} @var{y} @var{width} @var{height})}.
This may be different from @samp{geometry} in that space occupied by
various window manager features (docks, taskbars, etc.) may be
various window manager features (docks, taskbars, etc.)@: may be
excluded from the work area. Whether or not such features actually
subtract from the work area depends on the platform and environment.
Again, if the monitor is not the primary monitor, some of the
......@@ -1218,7 +1218,7 @@ These functions return the canonical height and width of a character in
@var{frame}, measured in pixels. Together, these values establish the
size of the default font on @var{frame}. The values depend on the
choice of font for @var{frame}, see @ref{Font and Color Parameters}.
@end defun
@end defun
The default font can be also set directly with the following function:
......
......@@ -1222,7 +1222,7 @@ This macro is the handy way to add the advice @var{function} to the function
stored in @var{place} (@pxref{Generalized Variables}).
@var{where} determines how @var{function} is composed with the
existing function, e.g. whether @var{function} should be called before, or
existing function, e.g., whether @var{function} should be called before, or
after the original function. @xref{Advice combinators}, for the list of
available ways to compose the two functions.
......@@ -1310,7 +1310,7 @@ and its properties.
@defun advice-eval-interactive-spec spec
Evaluate the interactive @var{spec} just like an interactive call to a function
with such a spec would, and then return the corresponding list of arguments
that was built. E.g. @code{(advice-eval-interactive-spec "r\nP")} will
that was built. E.g., @code{(advice-eval-interactive-spec "r\nP")} will
return a list of three elements, containing the boundaries of the region and
the current prefix argument.
@end defun
......
......@@ -1624,7 +1624,7 @@ similar advice may apply to the unsigned counterparts (e.g.,
of @code{intptr_t}).
@item
Prefer @code{int} for Emacs character codes, in the range 0 ..@: 0x3FFFFF.
Prefer @code{int} for Emacs character codes, in the range 0 ..@: 0x3FFFFF@.
More generally, prefer @code{int} for integers known to be in
@code{int} range, e.g., screen column counts.
......
......@@ -95,7 +95,7 @@ suffix), unless it contains an explicit directory name.
If the option @code{load-prefer-newer} is non-@code{nil}, then when
searching suffixes, @code{load} selects whichever version of a file
(@samp{.elc}, @samp{.el}, etc.) has been modified most recently.
(@samp{.elc}, @samp{.el}, etc.)@: has been modified most recently.
If @var{filename} is a relative file name, such as @file{foo} or
@file{baz/foo.bar}, @code{load} searches for the file using the variable
......
......@@ -102,7 +102,7 @@ the minibuffer is in a separate frame. @xref{Minibuffers and Frames}.
When Emacs is running in batch mode, any request to read from the
minibuffer actually reads a line from the standard input descriptor that
was supplied when Emacs was started. This supports only basic input:
none of the special minibuffer features (history, completion, etc.)
none of the special minibuffer features (history, completion, etc.)@:
are available in batch mode.
@node Text from Minibuffer
......
......@@ -261,7 +261,7 @@ If @var{x} is finite, then @var{s} is a floating-point number between 0.5
@math{x = s 2^e}.
@end tex
If @var{x} is zero or infinity, then @var{s} is the same as @var{x}.
If @var{x} is a NaN, then @var{s} is also a NaN.
If @var{x} is a NaN, then @var{s} is also a NaN@.
If @var{x} is zero, then @var{e} is 0.
@end defun
......
......@@ -344,7 +344,7 @@ When reading or writing from the standard input/output streams of the
Emacs process in batch mode, it is sometimes required to make sure any
arbitrary binary data will be read/written verbatim, and/or that no
translation of newlines to or from CR-LF pairs are performed. This
issue does not exist on Posix hosts, only on MS-Windows and MS-DOS.
issue does not exist on Posix hosts, only on MS-Windows and MS-DOS@.
The following function allows to control the I/O mode of any standard
stream of the Emacs process.
......
......@@ -811,7 +811,7 @@ Delete trailing whitespace in the region defined by @var{start} and
This command deletes whitespace characters after the last
non-whitespace character in each line in the region.
If this command acts on the entire buffer (i.e. if called
If this command acts on the entire buffer (i.e., if called
interactively with the mark inactive, or called from Lisp with
@var{end} @code{nil}), it also deletes all trailing lines at the end of the
buffer if the variable @code{delete-trailing-lines} is non-@code{nil}.
......@@ -2720,7 +2720,7 @@ text properties are considered, since strings never have overlays.
@defun get-pos-property position prop &optional object
This function is like @code{get-char-property}, except that it pays
attention to properties' stickiness and overlays' advancement settings
instead of the property of the character at (i.e. right after)
instead of the property of the character at (i.e., right after)
@var{position}.
@end defun
......
......@@ -111,9 +111,9 @@ You can use spaces inside a password or other token by surrounding the
token with either single or double quotes.
You can use single quotes inside a password or other token by
surrounding it with double quotes, e.g. @code{"he'llo"}. Similarly you
surrounding it with double quotes, e.g., @code{"he'llo"}. Similarly you
can use double quotes inside a password or other token by surrounding
it with single quotes, e.g. @code{'he"llo'}. You can't mix both (so a
it with single quotes, e.g., @code{'he"llo'}. You can't mix both (so a
password or other token can't have both single and double quotes).
All this is optional. You could just say (but we don't recommend it,
......
Markdown is supported
0% or .
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment