Commit 4181427f authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris
Browse files

Doc fixes: markup (mainly nil -> @code{nil})

parent 8f356841
......@@ -753,7 +753,7 @@ in replies, using the variable @code{mail-dont-reply-to-names}. Its
value should be a regular expression; any recipients that match are
excluded from the @samp{CC} field. They are also excluded from the
@samp{To} field, unless this would leave the field empty. If this
variable is nil, then the first time you compose a reply it is
variable is @code{nil}, then the first time you compose a reply it is
initialized to a default value that matches your own address.
To omit the @samp{CC} field completely for a particular reply, enter
......@@ -962,7 +962,7 @@ making any kind of summary discards any previous summary.
use for the summary window. The variable
@code{rmail-summary-line-count-flag} controls whether the summary line
for a message should include the line count of the message. Setting
this option to nil might speed up the generation of summaries.
this option to @code{nil} might speed up the generation of summaries.
@node Rmail Summary Edit
@subsection Editing in Summaries
......
......@@ -30,7 +30,7 @@ minimum of fuss. But @xref{Dynamic Binding Tips}, for tips to avoid
making your programs hard to understand.
@item
Calling a minor mode function from Lisp with a nil or omitted argument
Calling a minor mode function from Lisp with a @code{nil} or omitted argument
does not enable the minor mode unconditionally; instead, it toggles
the minor mode---which is the straightforward thing to do, since that
is the behavior when invoked interactively. One downside is that it
......
......@@ -1720,10 +1720,10 @@ Properties}.
@defun overlays-at pos &optional sorted
This function returns a list of all the overlays that cover the character at
position @var{pos} in the current buffer. If @var{sorted} is non-nil, the list
is in decreasing order of priority, otherwise it is in no particular order.
An overlay contains position @var{pos} if it begins at or before @var{pos}, and
ends after @var{pos}.
position @var{pos} in the current buffer. If @var{sorted} is non-@code{nil},
the list is in decreasing order of priority, otherwise it is in no particular
order. An overlay contains position @var{pos} if it begins at or before
@var{pos}, and ends after @var{pos}.
To illustrate usage, here is a Lisp function that returns a list of the
overlays that specify property @var{prop} for the character at point:
......
......@@ -2901,7 +2901,7 @@ Documentation}).
@item :key-sequence @var{keys}
@var{keys} is a hint for speeding up Emacs's first display of the
menu. It should be nil if you know that the menu item has no keyboard
menu. It should be @code{nil} if you know that the menu item has no keyboard
equivalent; otherwise it should be a string or vector specifying a
keyboard equivalent for the menu item.
......@@ -2929,7 +2929,7 @@ anything else (meaning an ordinary menu item).
@item :selected @var{selected}
@var{selected} is an expression; the checkbox or radio button is
selected whenever the expression's value is non-nil.
selected whenever the expression's value is non-@code{nil}.
@item :help @var{help}
@var{help} is a string describing the menu item.
......
......@@ -702,7 +702,7 @@ mode and minor modes. It uses the @code{documentation} function to
retrieve the documentation strings of the major and minor mode
commands (@pxref{Accessing Documentation}).
If called from Lisp with a non-nil @var{buffer} argument, this
If called from Lisp with a non-@code{nil} @var{buffer} argument, this
function displays the documentation for that buffer's major and minor
modes, rather than those of the current buffer.
@end deffn
......@@ -3804,8 +3804,8 @@ expressions (not separated by any token) rather than an expression.
@end itemize
When @var{arg} is a token, the function is called with point just before
that token. A return value of nil always means to fallback on the
default behavior, so the function should return nil for arguments it
that token. A return value of @code{nil} always means to fallback on the
default behavior, so the function should return @code{nil} for arguments it
does not expect.
@var{offset} can be:
......@@ -3904,7 +3904,7 @@ A few things to note:
@itemize
@item
The first case indicates the basic indentation increment to use.
If @code{sample-indent-basic} is nil, then SMIE uses the global
If @code{sample-indent-basic} is @code{nil}, then SMIE uses the global
setting @code{smie-indent-basic}. The major mode could have set
@code{smie-indent-basic} buffer-locally instead, but that
is discouraged.
......
......@@ -748,7 +748,7 @@ Here is an example of how you could use these hooks:
(add-hook 'suspend-resume-hook (lambda () (message "Resumed!")
(sit-for 2)))
@end smallexample
@c The sit-for prevents the ``nil'' that suspend-emacs returns
@c The sit-for prevents the @code{nil} that suspend-emacs returns
@c hiding the message.
Here is what you would see upon evaluating @code{(suspend-emacs "pwd")}:
......
......@@ -747,7 +747,7 @@ argument @var{b} is given, the result of this operation is stored into
@defun bool-vector-subsetp a b
Return @code{t} if every @code{t} value in @var{a} is also t in
@var{b}, nil otherwise. All arguments should be bool vectors of the
@var{b}, @code{nil} otherwise. All arguments should be bool vectors of the
same length.
@end defun
......
......@@ -806,7 +806,7 @@ non-whitespace character in each line in the region.
If this command acts on the entire buffer (i.e. if called
interactively with the mark inactive, or called from Lisp with
@var{end} nil), it also deletes all trailing lines at the end of the
@var{end} @code{nil}), it also deletes all trailing lines at the end of the
buffer if the variable @code{delete-trailing-lines} is non-@code{nil}.
@end deffn
......@@ -2865,7 +2865,7 @@ adding the face @var{face} to the @code{face} text property.
(@pxref{Special Properties}), such as a face name or an anonymous face
(@pxref{Faces}).
If any text in the region already has a non-nil @code{face} property,
If any text in the region already has a non-@code{nil} @code{face} property,
those face(s) are retained. This function sets the @code{face}
property to a list of faces, with @var{face} as the first element (by
default) and the pre-existing faces as the remaining elements. If the
......
......@@ -21624,7 +21624,7 @@ to
@noindent
Every character not part of the sub-formula @samp{b} has been changed
to a dot. (If the customizable variable
@code{calc-highlight-selections-with-faces} is non-nil, then the characters
@code{calc-highlight-selections-with-faces} is non-@code{nil}, then the characters
not part of the sub-formula are de-emphasized by using a less
noticeable face instead of using dots. @pxref{Displaying Selections}.)
The @samp{*} next to the line number is to remind you that
......@@ -21858,7 +21858,7 @@ by @samp{#} signs:
@end group
@end smallexample
If the customizable variable
@code{calc-highlight-selections-with-faces} is non-nil, then the
@code{calc-highlight-selections-with-faces} is non-@code{nil}, then the
non-selected portion of the formula will be de-emphasized by using a
less noticeable face (@code{calc-nonselected-face}) instead of dots
and the selected sub-formula will be highlighted by using a more
......@@ -3915,7 +3915,7 @@ Conceptually, a line of code is always indented relative to some
position higher up in the buffer (typically the indentation of the
previous line). That position is the @dfn{anchor position} in the
syntactic element. If there is an entry after the syntactic symbol in
the syntactic element list then it's either nil or that anchor position.
the syntactic element list then it's either @code{nil} or that anchor position.
Here is an example. Suppose we had the following code as the only thing
in a C++ buffer @footnote{The line numbers in this and future examples
......@@ -6067,7 +6067,7 @@ suggestion to get a consistent style):
@defun c-lineup-assignments
@findex lineup-assignments (c-)
Line up the current line after the assignment operator on the first line
in the statement. If there isn't any, return nil to allow stacking with
in the statement. If there isn't any, return @code{nil} to allow stacking with
other line-up functions. If the current line contains an assignment
operator too, try to align it with the first one.
......@@ -6532,7 +6532,7 @@ Return the syntactic symbol in @var{langelem}.
@defun c-langelem-pos langelem
@findex langelem-pos (c-)
Return the anchor position in @var{langelem}, or nil if there is none.
Return the anchor position in @var{langelem}, or @code{nil} if there is none.
@end defun
@defun c-langelem-col langelem &optional preserve-point
......
......@@ -1200,7 +1200,7 @@ until one of them returns true. The method
from the autoload. If it is a string (i.e., a project file name), it
checks to see if that exists in BUFFER's directory. If it is a
function, then it calls that function and expects it to return a file
name or nil. If the file exists, then this directory is assumed to be
name or @code{nil}. If the file exists, then this directory is assumed to be
part of a project, and @code{ede-directory-project-p} returns the
instance of @code{ede-project-autoload} that matched.
......@@ -1275,11 +1275,11 @@ Return a string that is the name of the target used by a Make system.
A brief description of the project or target. This is currently used
by the @samp{ede-speedbar} interface.
@item ede-want-file-p
Return non-nil if a target will accept a given file.
Return non-@code{nil} if a target will accept a given file.
It is generally unnecessary to override this. See the section on source
code.
@item ede-buffer-mine
Return non-nil if a buffer belongs to this target. Used during
Return non-@code{nil} if a buffer belongs to this target. Used during
association when a file is loaded. It is generally unnecessary to
override this unless you keep auxiliary files.
@end table
......@@ -1614,7 +1614,7 @@ Provide a speedbar description for @var{OBJ}.
@end deffn
@deffn Method ede-map-any-target-p :AFTER this proc
For project @var{THIS}, map @var{PROC} to all targets and return if any non-nil.
For project @var{THIS}, map @var{PROC} to all targets and return if any non-@code{nil}.
Return the first non-@code{nil} value returned by @var{PROC}.
@end deffn
......@@ -1768,7 +1768,7 @@ If @var{TARGET} belongs to a subproject, return that project file.
@end deffn
@deffn Method ede-find-target :AFTER proj buffer
Fetch the target in @var{PROJ} belonging to @var{BUFFER} or nil.
Fetch the target in @var{PROJ} belonging to @var{BUFFER} or @code{nil}.
@end deffn
@deffn Method ede-add-subproject :AFTER proj-a proj-b
......@@ -1884,8 +1884,8 @@ The function symbol must take two arguments:
NAME - The name of the file to find.
DIR - The directory root for this cpp-root project.
It should return the fully qualified file name passed in from NAME@. If that file does not
exist, it should return nil.
It should return the fully qualified file name passed in from NAME@.
If that file does not exist, it should return @code{nil}.
@end table
......@@ -2047,7 +2047,7 @@ Default Value: @code{nil}
Non-@code{nil} if this is a metasubproject.
Usually, a subproject is determined by a parent project. If multiple top level
projects are grouped into a large project not maintained by EDE, then you need
to set this to non-nil. The only effect is that the @code{dist} rule will then avoid
to set this to non-@code{nil}. The only effect is that the @code{dist} rule will then avoid
making a tar file.
@end table
......@@ -2281,7 +2281,7 @@ Default Value: @code{nil}
Non-@code{nil} if this is a metasubproject.
Usually, a subproject is determined by a parent project. If multiple top level
projects are grouped into a large project not maintained by EDE, then you need
to set this to non-nil. The only effect is that the @code{dist} rule will then avoid
to set this to non-@code{nil}. The only effect is that the @code{dist} rule will then avoid
making a tar file.
@end table
......
......@@ -1176,8 +1176,8 @@ Place the following in your init file:
@cindex font menu, adding fonts
@vindex w32-fixed-font-alist
If you have set w32-use-w32-font-dialog to nil, you can add fonts to
the font menu by changing `w32-fixed-font-alist'. For example:
If you have set w32-use-w32-font-dialog to @code{nil}, you can add fonts to
the font menu by changing @code{w32-fixed-font-alist}. For example:
@example
(setq w32-fixed-font-alist
......@@ -1664,8 +1664,8 @@ smtpmail is loaded, then you'll need to change
@code{smtpmail-smtp-server}.
If you are experiencing problems with sending large messages, check
the value of the variable @code{smtpmail-debug-info}. If it is non-nil, you
should set it to @code{nil}:
the value of the variable @code{smtpmail-debug-info}. If it is
non-@code{nil}, you should set it to @code{nil}:
@node Incoming mail with Rmail
@subsection Incoming mail with Rmail and POP3
......
......@@ -1948,7 +1948,7 @@ automatically scrolls the display horizontally when point moves off the
left or right edge of the window.
Note that this is overridden by the variable
@code{truncate-partial-width-windows} if that variable is non-nil
@code{truncate-partial-width-windows} if that variable is non-@code{nil}
and the current buffer is not full-frame width.
In Emacs 20, use @code{hscroll-mode}.
......
......@@ -306,7 +306,7 @@ or is of a subclass of @var{CLASS-NAME}.
@end defun
@defvar eieio-error-unsupported-class-tags
If non-nil, @code{defclass} signals an error if a tag in a slot
If non-@code{nil}, @code{defclass} signals an error if a tag in a slot
specifier is unsupported.
This option is here to support programs written with older versions of
......@@ -471,7 +471,7 @@ Here are some examples:
@item my-class-name
An object of your class type.
@item (or null symbol)
A symbol, or nil.
A symbol, or @code{nil}.
@end table
@item :allocation
......@@ -573,7 +573,7 @@ prefixed by the @code{:documentation} tag, and appears after the list
of slots, and before the options.
@item :allow-nil-initform
If this option is non-nil, and the @code{:initform} is @code{nil}, but
If this option is non-@code{nil}, and the @code{:initform} is @code{nil}, but
the @code{:type} is specifies something such as @code{string} then allow
this to pass. The default is to have this option be off. This is
implemented as an alternative to unbound slots.
......@@ -1264,7 +1264,7 @@ Return the list of public slots for @var{obj}.
@defun class-slot-initarg class slot
For the given @var{class} return the :initarg associated with
@var{slot}. Not all slots have initargs, so the return value can be
nil.
@code{nil}.
@end defun
@node Base Classes
......
......@@ -94,7 +94,7 @@ There's one way to find out if GnuTLS is available, by calling
Zaretskii) in the same directory as Emacs, you should be OK.
@defun gnutls-available-p
This function returns t if GnuTLS is available in this instance of Emacs.
This function returns @code{t} if GnuTLS is available in this instance of Emacs.
@end defun
Oh, but sometimes things go wrong. Budgets aren't balanced,
......
......@@ -139,8 +139,7 @@ An ERT test definition equivalent to the above comments is this:
If you know @code{defun}, the syntax of @code{ert-deftest} should look
familiar: This example defines a test named @code{pp-test-quote} that
will pass if the three calls to @code{equal} all return true
(non-nil).
will pass if the three calls to @code{equal} all return non-@code{nil}.
@code{should} is a macro with the same meaning as @code{cl-assert} but
better error reporting. @xref{The @code{should} Macro}.
......@@ -315,7 +314,8 @@ tests or symbols naming tests.
@item @code{(tag TAG)} selects all tests that have TAG on their tags list.
(Tags are optional labels you can apply to tests when you define them.)
@item @code{(satisfies PREDICATE)} selects all tests that satisfy PREDICATE,
a function that takes a test as argument and returns non-nil if it is selected.
a function that takes a test as argument and returns non-@code{nil} if
it is selected.
@end itemize
Selectors that are frequently useful when selecting tests to run
......@@ -382,13 +382,13 @@ F addition-test
@end example
In this example, @code{should} recorded the fact that (= (+ 1 2) 4)
reduced to (= 3 4) before it reduced to nil. When debugging why the
reduced to (= 3 4) before it reduced to @code{nil}. When debugging why the
test failed, it helps to know that the function @code{+} returned 3
here. ERT records the return value for any predicate called directly
within @code{should}.
In addition to @code{should}, ERT provides @code{should-not}, which
checks that the predicate returns nil, and @code{should-error}, which
checks that the predicate returns @code{nil}, and @code{should-error}, which
checks that the form called within it signals an error. An example
use of @code{should-error}:
......@@ -531,7 +531,7 @@ Instead, it is better to use lower-level mechanisms with simple and
predictable semantics like @code{with-temp-buffer}, @code{insert} or
@code{insert-file-contents-literally}, and to activate any desired mode
by calling the corresponding function directly, after binding the
hook variables to nil. This avoids the above problems.
hook variables to @code{nil}. This avoids the above problems.
@node Useful Techniques
......@@ -761,7 +761,7 @@ the arguments given to the explanation function, returns the value
that it returns. The explanation can be any object but should have a
comprehensible printed representation. If the return value of the
predicate needs no explanation for a given list of arguments, the
explanation function should return nil.
explanation function should return @code{nil}.
To associate an explanation function with a predicate, add the
property @code{ert-explainer} to the symbol that names the predicate.
......
......@@ -676,8 +676,8 @@ You can, of course, define your own virtual targets. They are defined
by adding a list of the form @samp{("/dev/name" @var{function} @var{mode})} to
@code{eshell-virtual-targets}. The first element is the device name;
@var{function} may be either a lambda or a function name. If
@var{mode} is nil, then the function is the output function; if it is
non-nil, then the function is passed the redirection mode as a
@var{mode} is @code{nil}, then the function is the output function; if it is
non-@code{nil}, then the function is passed the redirection mode as a
symbol--@code{overwrite} for @code{>}, @code{append} for @code{>>}, or
@code{insert} for @code{>>>}--and the function is expected to return
the output function.
......
......@@ -377,7 +377,7 @@ but it only says "nntp (news) open error", what to do?
You've got to tell Gnus where to fetch the news from. Read
the documentation for information on how to do this. As a
first start, put those lines in ~/.gnus.el:
first start, put those lines in @file{~/.gnus.el}:
@example
(setq gnus-select-method '(nntp "news.yourprovider.net"))
......@@ -389,7 +389,7 @@ first start, put those lines in ~/.gnus.el:
@node FAQ 3-2
@subsubheading Question 3.2
I'm working under Windows and have no idea what ~/.gnus.el means.
I'm working under Windows and have no idea what @file{~/.gnus.el} means.
@subsubheading Answer
......@@ -421,7 +421,7 @@ to Control Panel -> System -> Advanced). There you'll find the
possibility to set environment variables. Create a new one with
name HOME and value C:\myhome. Rebooting is not necessary.
Now to create ~/.gnus.el, say
Now to create @file{~/.gnus.el}, say
@samp{C-x C-f ~/.gnus.el RET C-x C-s}.
in Emacs.
......@@ -495,7 +495,7 @@ I want Gnus to fetch news from several servers, is this possible?
Of course. You can specify more sources for articles in the
variable gnus-secondary-select-methods. Add something like
this in ~/.gnus.el:
this in @file{~/.gnus.el}:
@example
(add-to-list 'gnus-secondary-select-methods
......@@ -566,7 +566,7 @@ commonly used one is nnml. It stores every mail in one file
and is therefore quite fast. However you might prefer a one
file per group approach if your file system has problems with
many small files, the nnfolder back end is then probably the
choice for you. To use nnml add the following to ~/.gnus.el:
choice for you. To use nnml add the following to @file{~/.gnus.el}:
@example
(add-to-list 'gnus-secondary-select-methods '(nnml ""))
......@@ -591,7 +591,7 @@ it's a POP3 server, then you need something like this:
@end example
@noindent
Make sure ~/.gnus.el isn't readable to others if you store
Make sure @file{~/.gnus.el} isn't readable to others if you store
your password there. If you want to read your mail from a
traditional spool file on your local machine, it's
......@@ -630,7 +630,7 @@ OK, now you only need to tell Gnus how to send mail. If you
want to send mail via sendmail (or whichever MTA is playing
the role of sendmail on your system), you don't need to do
anything. However, if you want to send your mail to an
SMTP Server you need the following in your ~/.gnus.el
SMTP Server you need the following in your @file{~/.gnus.el}
@example
(setq send-mail-function 'smtpmail-send-it)
......@@ -650,7 +650,7 @@ There are two ways of using IMAP with Gnus. The first one is
to use IMAP like POP3, that means Gnus fetches the mail from
the IMAP server and stores it on disk. If you want to do
this (you don't really want to do this) add the following to
~/.gnus.el
@file{~/.gnus.el}
@example
(add-to-list 'mail-sources '(imap :server "mail.mycorp.com"
......@@ -765,7 +765,7 @@ Loading only unread messages can be annoying if you have threaded view enabled,
@end example
@noindent
in ~/.gnus.el to load enough old articles to prevent teared threads, replace 'some with t to load
in @file{~/.gnus.el} to load enough old articles to prevent teared threads, replace 'some with @code{t} to load
all articles (Warning: Both settings enlarge the amount of data which is
fetched when you enter a group and slow down the process of entering a group).
......@@ -829,7 +829,7 @@ The variable gnus-visible-headers controls which headers
are shown, its value is a regular expression, header lines
which match it are shown. So if you want author, subject,
date, and if the header exists, Followup-To and MUA / NUA
say this in ~/.gnus.el:
say this in @file{~/.gnus.el}:
@example
(setq gnus-visible-headers
......@@ -856,7 +856,7 @@ Say
@end example
@noindent
in ~/.gnus.el. If you don't want HTML rendered, even if there's no text alternative add
in @file{~/.gnus.el}. If you don't want HTML rendered, even if there's no text alternative add
@example
(setq mm-automatic-display (remove "text/html" mm-automatic-display))
......@@ -970,7 +970,7 @@ adaptive scoring say
@end example
@noindent
in ~/.gnus.el.
in @file{~/.gnus.el}.
@node FAQ 4-10
@subsubheading Question 4.10
......@@ -985,7 +985,7 @@ While in group buffer move point over the group and hit
can set options for the group. At the bottom of the buffer
you'll find an item that allows you to set variables
locally for the group. To disable threading enter
gnus-show-threads as name of variable and nil as
gnus-show-threads as name of variable and @code{nil} as
value. Hit button done at the top of the buffer when
you're ready.
......@@ -1147,7 +1147,7 @@ don't want that (you probably don't want), say
@end example
@noindent
in ~/.gnus.el.
in @file{~/.gnus.el}.
An example might be better than thousand words, so here's
my nnmail-split-methods. Note that I send duplicates in a
......@@ -1269,7 +1269,7 @@ For other versions of Gnus, say
@end example
@noindent
in ~/.gnus.el.
in @file{~/.gnus.el}.
You can reformat a paragraph by hitting @samp{M-q}
(as usual).
......@@ -1303,7 +1303,7 @@ following lists are signature, signature-file,
organization, address, name or body. The attribute name
can also be a string. In that case, this will be used as
a header name, and the value will be inserted in the
headers of the article; if the value is `nil', the header
headers of the article; if the value is @code{nil}, the header
name will be removed. You can also say (eval (foo bar)),
then the function foo will be evaluated with argument bar
and the result will be thrown away.
......@@ -1395,7 +1395,7 @@ If you want your outgoing messages to be spell-checked, say
@end example
@noindent
In your ~/.gnus.el, if you prefer on-the-fly spell-checking say
In your @file{~/.gnus.el}, if you prefer on-the-fly spell-checking say
@example
(add-hook 'message-mode-hook (lambda () (flyspell-mode 1)))
......@@ -1423,7 +1423,7 @@ Yes, say something like
@end example
@noindent
in ~/.gnus.el. Change "^de\\." and "deutsch8" to something
in @file{~/.gnus.el}. Change "^de\\." and "deutsch8" to something
that suits your needs.
@node FAQ 5-7
......@@ -1452,7 +1452,7 @@ details.
However, what you really want is the Insidious Big Brother
Database bbdb. Get it through the XEmacs package system or from
@uref{http://bbdb.sourceforge.net/, bbdb's homepage}.
Now place the following in ~/.gnus.el, to activate bbdb for Gnus:
Now place the following in @file{~/.gnus.el}, to activate bbdb for Gnus:
@example
(require 'bbdb)
......@@ -1532,7 +1532,7 @@ Now you only have to tell Gnus to include the X-face in your postings by saying
@end example
@noindent
in ~/.gnus.el. If you use Gnus 5.10, you can simply add an entry
in @file{~/.gnus.el}. If you use Gnus 5.10, you can simply add an entry
@example
(x-face-file "~/.xface")
......@@ -1550,7 +1550,7 @@ newsgroups?
@subsubheading Answer
Put this in ~/.gnus.el:
Put this in @file{~/.gnus.el}:
@example
(setq gnus-confirm-mail-reply-to-news t)
......@@ -1580,7 +1580,7 @@ How to tell Gnus not to generate a sender header?
@subsubheading Answer
Since 5.10 Gnus doesn't generate a sender header by
default. For older Gnus' try this in ~/.gnus.el:
default. For older Gnus' try this in @file{~/.gnus.el}:
@example
(eval-after-load "message"
......@@ -1645,7 +1645,7 @@ by saying:
@end example
@noindent
in ~/.gnus.el. If you use Gnus 5.9 or earlier, you can use this
in @file{~/.gnus.el}. If you use Gnus 5.9 or earlier, you can use this
instead (works for newer versions as well):
@example
......@@ -1745,7 +1745,7 @@ by saying @samp{O f}. However, wouldn't
it be much more convenient to have more direct access to
the archived message from Gnus? If you say yes, put this
snippet by Frank Haun <pille3003@@fhaun.de> in
~/.gnus.el:
@file{~/.gnus.el}:
@example
(defun my-archive-article (&optional n)
......@@ -1898,7 +1898,7 @@ to another group.
@subsubheading Answer
Say something like this in ~/.gnus.el:
Say something like this in @file{~/.gnus.el}:
@example
(setq nnmail-expiry-target "nnml:expired")
......@@ -1980,7 +1980,7 @@ The Gnus agent is part of Gnus, it allows you to fetch
mail and news and store them on disk for reading them
later when you're offline. It kind of mimics offline
newsreaders like Forte Agent. If you want to use
the Agent place the following in ~/.gnus.el if you are
the Agent place the following in @file{~/.gnus.el} if you are
still using 5.8.8 or 5.9 (it's the default since 5.10):
@example
......@@ -2175,13 +2175,13 @@ Starting Gnus is really slow, how to speed it up?
The reason for this could be the way Gnus reads its
active file, see the node "The Active File" in the Gnus
manual for things you might try to speed the process up.
An other idea would be to byte compile your ~/.gnus.el (say
An other idea would be to byte compile your @file{~/.gnus.el} (say
@samp{M-x byte-compile-file RET ~/.gnus.el
RET} to do it). Finally, if you have require
statements in your .gnus, you could replace them with
eval-after-load, which loads the stuff not at startup
time, but when it's needed. Say you've got this in your
~/.gnus.el:
@file{~/.gnus.el}:
@example
(require 'message)
......@@ -2208,7 +2208,7 @@ How to speed up the process of entering a group?
@subsubheading Answer
A speed killer is setting the variable
gnus-fetch-old-headers to anything different from nil,
gnus-fetch-old-headers to anything different from @code{nil},
so don't do this if speed is an issue. To speed up
building of summary say
......@@ -2217,7 +2217,7 @@ building of summary say
@end example
@noindent
at the bottom of your ~/.gnus.el, this will make gnus
at the bottom of your @file{~/.gnus.el}, this will make gnus