Commit 41835686 authored by Lute Kamstra's avatar Lute Kamstra

Remove some uses of the term "buffer" before it is properly

introduced.  Update the description of the mode line.  Consistently
use "<ESC>" to denote the ESC key and "<SPC>" to denote the Space bar.
Capitalize all command descriptions.
parent 94cd554a
2005-02-08 Lute Kamstra <lute@gnu.org>
* TUTORIAL: Remove some uses of the term "buffer" before it is
properly introduced. Update the description of the mode line.
Consistently use "<ESC>" to denote the ESC key and "<SPC>" to
denote the Space bar. Capitalize all command descriptions.
2005-02-06 Richard M. Stallman <rms@gnu.org>
* DEBUG: Minor clarification.
......
You are looking at the Emacs tutorial. See end for copying conditions.
Copyright (c) 1985, 1996, 1998, 2001, 2002 Free Software Foundation.
Copyright (c) 1985, 1996, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2005 Free Software Foundation.
Emacs commands generally involve the CONTROL key (sometimes labeled
CTRL or CTL) or the META key (sometimes labeled EDIT or ALT). Rather than
......@@ -259,9 +259,9 @@ If you type one of the disabled commands, Emacs displays a message
saying what the command was, and asking you whether you want to go
ahead and execute the command.
If you really want to try the command, type Space in answer to the
question. Normally, if you do not want to execute the disabled
command, answer the question with "n".
If you really want to try the command, type <SPC> (the Space bar) in
answer to the question. Normally, if you do not want to execute the
disabled command, answer the question with "n".
>> Type C-x C-l (which is a disabled command),
then type n to answer the question.
......@@ -352,27 +352,27 @@ You've now learned the most basic way of typing something in
Emacs and correcting errors. You can delete by words or lines
as well. Here is a summary of the delete operations:
<Delback> delete the character just before the cursor
C-d delete the next character after the cursor
<Delback> Delete the character just before the cursor
C-d Delete the next character after the cursor
M-<Delback> kill the word immediately before the cursor
M-d kill the next word after the cursor
M-<Delback> Kill the word immediately before the cursor
M-d Kill the next word after the cursor
C-k kill from the cursor position to end of line
M-k kill to the end of the current sentence
C-k Kill from the cursor position to end of line
M-k Kill to the end of the current sentence
Notice that <Delback> and C-d vs M-<Delback> and M-d extend the parallel
started by C-f and M-f (well, <Delback> is not really a control
character, but let's not worry about that). C-k and M-k are like C-e
and M-e, sort of, in that lines are opposite sentences.
You can also kill any part of the buffer with one uniform method.
Move to one end of that part, and type C-@ or C-SPC (either one).
(SPC is the Space bar.) Move to the other end of that part, and type
C-w. That kills all the text between the two positions.
You can also kill any part of the text with one uniform method. Move
to one end of that part, and type C-@ or C-<SPC> (either one). (<SPC>
is the Space bar.) Move to the other end of that part, and type C-w.
That kills all the text between the two positions.
>> Move the cursor to the Y at the start of the previous paragraph.
>> Type C-SPC. Emacs should display a message "Mark set"
>> Type C-<SPC>. Emacs should display a message "Mark set"
at the bottom of the screen.
>> Move the cursor to the n in "end", on the second line of the
paragraph.
......@@ -401,9 +401,9 @@ lines and their newlines; typing C-k twice would not do that.
Bringing back killed text is called "yanking". (Think of it as
yanking back, or pulling back, some text that was taken away.) You
can yank the killed text either at the same place where it was killed,
or at some other place in the buffer, or even in a different file.
You can yank the same text several times; that makes multiple copies
of it.
or at some other place in the text you are editing, or even in a
different file. You can yank the same text several times; that makes
multiple copies of it.
The command for yanking is C-y. It reinserts the last killed text,
at the current cursor position.
......@@ -638,11 +638,12 @@ the X (eXtend) command. This comes in two flavors:
M-x Named command eXtend. Followed by a long name.
These are commands that are generally useful but used less than the
commands you have already learned about. You have already seen two of
them: the file commands C-x C-f to Find and C-x C-s to Save. Another
example is the command to end the Emacs session--this is the command
C-x C-c. (Do not worry about losing changes you have made; C-x C-c
offers to save each changed file before it kills the Emacs.)
commands you have already learned about. You have already seen a few
of them: the file commands C-x C-f to Find and C-x C-s to Save, for
example. Another example is the command to end the Emacs
session--this is the command C-x C-c. (Do not worry about losing
changes you have made; C-x C-c offers to save each changed file before
it kills the Emacs.)
C-z is the command to exit Emacs *temporarily*--so that you can go
back to the same Emacs session afterward.
......@@ -666,12 +667,14 @@ with C-z instead of exiting Emacs.
There are many C-x commands. Here is a list of the ones you have learned:
C-x C-f Find file.
C-x C-s Save file.
C-x C-b List buffers.
C-x C-c Quit Emacs.
C-x 1 Delete all but one window.
C-x u Undo.
C-x C-f Find file
C-x C-s Save file
C-x s Save some buffers
C-x C-b List buffers
C-x b Switch buffer
C-x C-c Quit Emacs
C-x 1 Delete all but one window
C-x u Undo
Named eXtended commands are commands which are used even less
frequently, or commands which are used only in certain modes. An
......@@ -727,18 +730,18 @@ shows them to you at the bottom of the screen in an area called the
The line immediately above the echo area is called the "mode line".
The mode line says something like this:
--:** TUTORIAL (Fundamental)--L670--58%----------------
--:** TUTORIAL 63% L749 (Fundamental)-----------------------
This line gives useful information about the status of Emacs and
the text you are editing.
You already know what the filename means--it is the file you have
found. -NN%-- indicates your current position in the text; it means
that NN percent of the text is above the top of the screen. If the
top of the file is on the screen, it will say --Top-- instead of
--00%--. If the bottom of the text is on the screen, it will say
--Bot--. If you are looking at text so small that all of it fits on
the screen, the mode line says --All--.
found. NN% indicates your current position in the text; it means that
NN percent of the text is above the top of the screen. If the top of
the file is on the screen, it will say "Top" instead of " 0%". If the
bottom of the text is on the screen, it will say "Bot". If you are
looking at text so small that all of it fits on the screen, the mode
line says "All".
The L and digits indicate position in another way: they give the
current line number of point.
......@@ -767,6 +770,7 @@ switch to Fundamental mode.
If you are going to be editing human-language text, such as this file, you
should probably use Text Mode.
>> Type M-x text mode<Return>.
Don't worry, none of the Emacs commands you have learned changes in
......@@ -897,7 +901,7 @@ window on the screen at the same time.
Both windows display this tutorial. The cursor stays in the top window.
>> Type C-M-v to scroll the bottom window.
(If you do not have a real META key, type ESC C-v.)
(If you do not have a real META key, type <ESC> C-v.)
>> Type C-x o ("o" for "other") to move the cursor to the bottom window.
>> Use C-v and M-v in the bottom window to scroll it.
......@@ -921,10 +925,10 @@ META key, you can type C-M-v by holding down both CONTROL and META while
typing v. It does not matter whether CONTROL or META "comes first,"
because both of these keys act by modifying the characters you type.
If you do not have a real META key, and you use ESC instead, the order
does matter: you must type ESC followed by CONTROL-v, because
CONTROL-ESC v will not work. This is because ESC is a character in
its own right, not a modifier key.
If you do not have a real META key, and you use <ESC> instead, the
order does matter: you must type <ESC> followed by CONTROL-v, because
CONTROL-<ESC> v will not work. This is because <ESC> is a character
in its own right, not a modifier key.
>> Type C-x 1 (in the top window) to get rid of the bottom window.
......@@ -955,11 +959,12 @@ level". This is indicated by square brackets in the mode line,
surrounding the parentheses around the major mode name. For
example, you might see [(Fundamental)] instead of (Fundamental).
To get out of the recursive editing level, type ESC ESC ESC. That is
an all-purpose "get out" command. You can also use it for eliminating
extra windows, and getting out of the minibuffer.
To get out of the recursive editing level, type <ESC> <ESC> <ESC>.
That is an all-purpose "get out" command. You can also use it for
eliminating extra windows, and getting out of the minibuffer.
>> Type M-x to get into a minibuffer; then type ESC ESC ESC to get out.
>> Type M-x to get into a minibuffer; then type <ESC> <ESC> <ESC> to
get out.
You cannot use C-g to get out of a recursive editing level. This is
because C-g is used for canceling commands and arguments WITHIN the
......@@ -1099,7 +1104,7 @@ starting with the one written by Stuart Cracraft for the original Emacs.
This version of the tutorial, like GNU Emacs, is copyrighted, and
comes with permission to distribute copies on certain conditions:
Copyright (c) 1985, 1996, 1998, 2001, 2002 Free Software Foundation
Copyright (c) 1985, 1996, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2005 Free Software Foundation
Permission is granted to anyone to make or distribute verbatim copies
of this document as received, in any medium, provided that the
......
Markdown is supported
0% or
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment