Commit 41be8731 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

Clarify C-u C-x v v cvs RET. Clarify the purpose of C-x v b.

parent 00a7861a
......@@ -1986,21 +1986,20 @@ If you do not use locking under CVS (the default), locking is also
disabled for RCS, so that editing under RCS works exactly as under
CVS.
When you are done with your edits, you can commit the final version
back to the CVS repository, typing @kbd{C-u C-x v v cvs @key{RET}}. Emacs
will initialize the log entry buffer (@pxref{Log Buffer}) to contain
all the log entries you have recorded in the RCS master; you can make
changes to these comments as needed, and then commit in CVS by typing
@kbd{C-c C-c}. If the commit is successful, VC removes the RCS
master, so that the file is once again registered under CVS only.
(The RCS master is not actually deleted, just renamed by appending
@samp{~} to the name, so that you can refer to it later if you wish.)
While you are working with a local RCS master, you may still want to
pick up recent changes from the CVS repository into your local file,
or you might want to commit some of your changes back to CVS, without
actually switching back to CVS completely. You can do this by
switching to another backend temporarily.
When you are done with local editing, you can commit the final version
back to the CVS repository by typing @kbd{C-u C-x v v cvs @key{RET}}.
This initializes the log entry buffer (@pxref{Log Buffer}) to contain
all the log entries you have recorded in the RCS master; you can edit
them as you wish, and then commit in CVS by typing @kbd{C-c C-c}. If
the commit is successful, VC removes the RCS master, so that the file
is once again registered under CVS only. (The RCS master is not
actually deleted, just renamed by appending @samp{~} to the name, so
that you can refer to it later if you wish.)
While using local RCS, you can pick up recent changes from the CVS
repository into your local file, or commit some of your changes back
to CVS, without terminating local RCS version control. To do this,
switch to the CVS backend temporarily, with the @kbd{C-x v b} command:
@table @kbd
@item C-x v b
......@@ -2022,18 +2021,18 @@ If the current file is registered in more than one back end, typing
@kbd{C-x v b} ``cycles'' through all of these back ends. With a
prefix argument, it asks for the back end to use in the minibuffer.
Thus, if you have a file under local RCS, and you want to pick up some
recent changes from CVS, type @kbd{C-x v b} to switch to CVS, and then
@kbd{C-x v m @key{RET}} to merge the news (@pxref{Merging}). You can
then switch back to RCS by typing @kbd{C-x v b} again, and continue to
edit locally.
Note though, that if you do this, the revision numbers in the RCS
master no longer correspond to those of CVS in a meaningful way.
Technically, this is not a problem, but it might be more difficult for
you to keep track of what is in the repository and what is not. So we
suggest that, frequently, you commit your changes back to CVS
completely using @kbd{C-u C-x v v cvs @key{RET}}.
Thus, if you are using local RCS, and you want to pick up some recent
changes in the file from remote CVS, first visit the file, then type
@kbd{C-x v b} to switch to CVS, and finally use @kbd{C-x v m
@key{RET}} to merge the news (@pxref{Merging}). You can then switch
back to RCS by typing @kbd{C-x v b} again, and continue to edit
locally.
But if you do this, the revision numbers in the RCS master no longer
correspond to those of CVS. Technically, this is not a problem, but
it can become difficult to keep track of what is in the CVS repository
and what is not. So we suggest that you return from time to time to
CVS-only operation, using @kbd{C-u C-x v v cvs @key{RET}}.
@node Snapshots
@subsection Snapshots
......
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