Commit 43b11fee authored by Eli Zaretskii's avatar Eli Zaretskii

(quail-cxterm-package-ext-info): Fix doc strings of chinese-py-b5,

chinese-py, and chinese-tonepy input methods.
parent 19e713d8
2000-09-07 Eli Zaretskii <eliz@is.elta.co.il>
* international/titdic-cnv.el (quail-cxterm-package-ext-info): Fix
doc strings of chinese-py-b5, chinese-py, and chinese-tonepy input
methods.
* menu-bar.el (read-mail-item-name): New function.
(menu-bar-tools-menu): Use it to compute and display the package
used to read email.
......
......@@ -90,24 +90,24 @@ This input method works almost the same way as `chinese-py' (which
see).
This input method supports only Han characters. The more convenient
method is `chinese-py-punct-b5' which is the conbination of this
method and `chinese-punct-b5' and supports both Han characters and
punctuations/symbols.
method is `chinese-py-punct-b5', which is the combination of this
method and `chinese-punct-b5' and which supports both Han characters
and punctuation/symbols.
For double-width Big5 characters correponding to ASCII, use the input
For double-width Big5 characters corresponding to ASCII, use the input
method `chinese-qj-b5'.
The input method `chinese-py' and `chinese-tonepy' are also Pinyin
base, but for the character set GB2312 (`chinese-gb2312').")
based, but for the character set GB2312 (`chinese-gb2312').")
("chinese-py" "$AF4(BG"
"Pinyin base input method for Chinese charset GB2312
\(`chinese-gb2312').
Pinyin is the standared roman transliteration method for Chinese.
Pinyin uses a sequence of Latin alphabets for each Chinese character.
The sequence is made by the combination of the initials (the beginning
sounds) and finals (the ending sounds).
Pinyin uses a sequence of Latin alphabetic characters for each Chinese
character. The sequence is made by the combination of the initials
(the beginning sounds) and finals (the ending sounds).
initials: b p m f d t n l z c s zh ch sh r j q x g k h
finals: a o e i er ai ei oa ou an en ang eng ong i ia iao ie iu ian in
......@@ -117,28 +117,28 @@ sounds) and finals (the ending sounds).
four finals should be written by the character u-umlaut `$A(9(B'.)
With this input method, each time you type a key, list of Chinese
characters corresponding to the accumulated key sequence is shown at
the echo area. Then you can select one from the list by typing an
index number or by navigating in the candidate list by C-b, C-f, C-n,
and C-p.
characters corresponding to the accumulated key sequence is shown in
the echo area. You can then select one character from that list by
typing an index number or by navigating in the list of candidates with
C-b, C-f, C-n, and C-p.
For instance, to input $ADc(B, you type \"n i C-n 3\". The first \"n i\"
is a Pinyin, \"C-n\" selects the next group of candidates (each group
contains at most 10 characters), \"3\" select the third character in
that block.
that group.
This input method supports only Han characters. The more convenient
method is `chinese-py-punct' which is the conbination of this method
and `chinese-punct' and supports both Han characters and
punctuations/symbols.
method is `chinese-py-punct', which is the combination of this method
and `chinese-punct', and supports both Han characters and
punctuation/symbols.
For double-width GB2312 characters correponding to ASCII, use the
For double-width GB2312 characters corresponding to ASCII, use the
input method `chinese-qj'.
The correct Pinyin system specifies tones by diacritical marks, but
this input method doesn't use them, which results in easy (you don't
have to know exact tones) but verbose (many characters are assigned to
a same key seuqnece) inputting. You may also want to try the input
have to know the exact tones), but verbose (many characters are assigned
to the same key sequence) input. You may also want to try the input
method `chinese-tonepy' with which you must specify tones by digits
\(1..5).")
......@@ -160,7 +160,7 @@ method `chinese-py'.
This input method works almost the same way as `chinese-py'. The
difference is that you must type 1..5 after each Pinyin to specify a
tone. So, to input $ADc(B, you type \"n i 3 3\", the first \"n i\" is a
Pinyin, the next \"3\" specifies tone, the last \"3\" selecte the
Pinyin, the next \"3\" specifies tone, and the last \"3\" selects the
third character from the candidate list.
For double-width GB2312 characters correponding to ASCII, use the
......
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