Commit 43d08eb9 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

(Text Display): Renamed show-nonbreak-escape

to nobreak-char-display and no-break-space to nobreak-space.
(Standard Faces): Split up the list of standard faces
and put it in a separate node.
Add nobreak-space and escape-glyph.
parent 470a11a3
......@@ -12,6 +12,7 @@ display it.
@menu
* Faces:: How to change the display style using faces.
* Standard Faces:: Emacs' predefined faces.
* Font Lock:: Minor mode for syntactic highlighting using faces.
* Highlight Changes:: Using colors to show where you changed the buffer.
* Highlight Interactively:: Tell Emacs what text to highlight.
......@@ -44,6 +45,12 @@ terminals support inverse video, bold, and underline attributes; some
support colors. Character terminals generally do not support changing
the height and width or the font family.
The easiest way to use faces is to turn on Font Lock mode.
@xref{Font Lock}, for more information about Font Lock mode and
syntactic highlighting. You can print out the buffer with the
highlighting that appears on your screen using the command
@code{ps-print-buffer-with-faces}. @xref{PostScript}.
Features which rely on text in multiple faces (such as Font Lock mode)
will also work on non-windowed terminals that can display more than one
face, whether by colors or underlining and emboldening. This includes
......@@ -90,21 +97,88 @@ fonts for editing program source code. Filling will sometimes make
lines too long or too short. We plan to address these issues in
future Emacs versions.
@node Standard Faces
@section Standard Faces
@findex list-faces-display
To see what faces are currently defined, and what they look like, type
@kbd{M-x list-faces-display}. It's possible for a given face to look
different in different frames; this command shows the appearance in the
frame in which you type it. Here's a list of the standard defined
faces:
To see what faces are currently defined, and what they look like,
type @kbd{M-x list-faces-display}. It's possible for a given face to
look different in different frames; this command shows the appearance
in the frame in which you type it. Here are the standard faces
for specifying text appearance:
@table @code
@item default
This face is used for ordinary text that doesn't specify any other face.
@item bold
This face uses a bold variant of the default font, if it has one.
@item italic
This face uses an italic variant of the default font, if it has one.
@item bold-italic
This face uses a bold italic variant of the default font, if it has one.
@item underline
This face underlines text.
@item fixed-pitch
The basic fixed-pitch face.
@item variable-pitch
The basic variable-pitch face.
@end table
Here's an incomplete list of faces used to highlight parts of the
text temporarily for specific purposes. (Many other modes define
their own faces for this purpose.)
@table @code
@item highlight
This face is used for highlighting portions of text, in various modes.
For example, mouse-sensitive text is highlighted using this face.
@item mode-line-highlight
Like @code{highlight}, but used for portions of text on mode lines.
@item isearch
This face is used for highlighting Isearch matches.
@item lazy-highlight
This face is used for lazy highlighting of Isearch and Query Replace
matches other than the current one.
@item region
This face is used for displaying a selected region (when Transient Mark
mode is enabled---see below).
@item secondary-selection
This face is used for displaying a secondary X selection (@pxref{Secondary
Selection}).
@item trailing-whitespace
The face for highlighting trailing whitespace when
@code{show-trailing-whitespace} is non-@code{nil}; see @ref{Useless
Whitespace}.
@item nobreak-space
The face for displaying the character ``nobreak space''.
@item escape-glyph
The face for highlighting the @samp{\} or @samp{^} that indicates
a control character. It's also used when @samp{\} indicates a
nobreak space or nobreak (soft) hyphen.
@item shadow
The basic face for making the text less noticeable than the surrounding
ordinary text. Usually this is achieved by using shades of grey in
contrast with either black or white default foreground color.
@end table
@cindex @code{region} face
When Transient Mark mode is enabled, the text of the region is
highlighted when the mark is active. This uses the face named
@code{region}; you can control the style of highlighting by changing the
style of this face (@pxref{Face Customization}). @xref{Transient Mark},
for more information about Transient Mark mode and activation and
deactivation of the mark.
These faces control the appearance of parts of the Emacs frame.
They exist as faces to provide a consistent way to customize the
appearance of these parts of the frame.
@table @code
@item mode-line
This face is used for the mode line of the currently selected window.
By default, it's drawn with shadows for a ``raised'' effect on window
systems, and drawn as the inverse of the default face on non-windowed
terminals. @xref{Display Custom}.
terminals.
@item mode-line-inactive
Like @code{mode-line}, but used for mode lines of the windows other
than the selected one (if @code{mode-line-in-non-selected-windows} is
......@@ -119,39 +193,15 @@ character terminals. By default this face inherits from the
@code{mode-line-inactive} face.
@item minibuffer-prompt
This face is used for the prompt strings displayed in the minibuffer.
@item highlight
This face is used for highlighting portions of text, in various modes.
For example, mouse-sensitive text is highlighted using this face.
@item mode-line-highlight
Like @code{highlight}, but used for portions of text on mode lines.
@item isearch
This face is used for highlighting Isearch matches.
@item lazy-highlight
This face is used for lazy highlighting of Isearch and Query Replace
matches other than the current one.
@item region
This face is used for displaying a selected region (when Transient Mark
mode is enabled---see below).
@item secondary-selection
This face is used for displaying a secondary X selection (@pxref{Secondary
Selection}).
@item bold
This face uses a bold variant of the default font, if it has one.
@item italic
This face uses an italic variant of the default font, if it has one.
@item bold-italic
This face uses a bold italic variant of the default font, if it has one.
@item underline
This face underlines text.
@item fixed-pitch
The basic fixed-pitch face.
@item fringe
@cindex fringe
The face for the fringes to the left and right of windows on graphic
displays. (The fringes are the narrow portions of the Emacs frame
between the text area and the window's right and left borders.)
@xref{Fringes}.
@item scroll-bar
This face determines the visual appearance of the scroll bar.
@xref{Scroll Bars}.
@item border
This face determines the color of the frame border.
@item cursor
......@@ -160,41 +210,15 @@ This face determines the color of the cursor.
This face determines the color of the mouse pointer.
@item tool-bar
This is the basic tool-bar face. No text appears in the tool bar, but the
colors of this face affect the appearance of tool bar icons.
colors of this face affect the appearance of tool bar icons. @xref{Tool Bars}.
@item tooltip
This face is used for tooltips.
This face is used for tooltips. @xref{Tooltips}.
@item menu
This face determines the colors and font of Emacs's menus. Setting the
font of LessTif/Motif menus is currently not supported; attempts to set
the font are ignored in this case.
@item trailing-whitespace
The face for highlighting trailing whitespace when
@code{show-trailing-whitespace} is non-@code{nil}; see @ref{Useless
Whitespace}.
@item variable-pitch
The basic variable-pitch face.
@item shadow
The basic face for making the text less noticeable than the surrounding
ordinary text. Usually this is achieved by using shades of grey in
contrast with either black or white default foreground color.
the font are ignored in this case. @xref{Menu Bars}.
@end table
@cindex @code{region} face
When Transient Mark mode is enabled, the text of the region is
highlighted when the mark is active. This uses the face named
@code{region}; you can control the style of highlighting by changing the
style of this face (@pxref{Face Customization}). @xref{Transient Mark},
for more information about Transient Mark mode and activation and
deactivation of the mark.
One easy way to use faces is to turn on Font Lock mode. @xref{Font
Lock}, for more information about Font Lock mode and syntactic
highlighting.
You can print out the buffer with the highlighting that appears
on your screen using the command @code{ps-print-buffer-with-faces}.
@xref{PostScript}.
@node Font Lock
@section Font Lock mode
@cindex Font Lock mode
......
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